The Virtual Volunteering Guidebook: How to Apply the Principle of Real-World Volunteer Management

first_imgThe Virtual Volunteering Guidebook: How to Apply the Principle of Real-World Volunteer Management Howard Lake | 23 November 2007 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  12 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Cricket News 43 runs in an over: New Zealand pair create new List A World Record

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: A List A game (limited overs game) between Northern Districts and Central Districts on Wednesday at Seddon Park in Hamilton, New Zealand, saw history being created as two batsmen combined to smash 43 runs in one over. Joe Carter and Brett Hampton of Northern Districts were the two batsmen as they were helped by a pair of no-balls from Central District’s Willem Ludick to create a new world record. ALSO READ | Don’t live in India if you like players from other countries: Kohli  Ludick conceded a boundary off the very first ball thanks to an inside edge and from that point, things went pear-shaped for the South African-born player. The next two balls were waist-high full tosses and was dispatched for two sixes. To make matters worse, both were declared no-balls.  With the second legitimate delivery, Ludick conceded a six and gave away a single. The last three balls did not end very well for the right-arm pacer as he gave away three more sixes to concede a whopping 43 runs. The onslaught not only ruined Ludick’s figures, but it proved to be a major turning point of the match as Carter (102) and Hampton (95) helped Northern Districts register a 25-run win.  Massive overs in cricket The 43-run over broke the previous record of 39 set by Zimbabwe batsman Elton Chigumbura off Alauddin Babu in a game between Sheikh Jamal and Abahani Ltd in a domestic fixture in Dhaka in 2013-14. Chigumbura was aided by a no-ball and six wides as the batsman blasted four sixes in one over.  Even Twenty20 cricket has seen some massive overs. In a T20 game in Brighton in 2012 between Sussex and Gloucestershire, New Zealand’s Scott Styris, playing for Sussex, blasted 38 runs in one over bowled by James Fuller. The pace bowler began the over disastrously with 10 no-balls. Styris proceeded to blast two sixes and two fours as he blasted a 100 off just 37 balls.  In the IPL, Chris Gayle cemented his place as T20’s biggest hitter when he blasted 37 runs in one over during the 2011 edition. Playing for Royal Challengers Bangalore, Gayle blasted Kochi Tuskers Kerala’s Prasanth Parameswaran to give his side a nine-wicket win.In addition to these big overs, there have been some freakish runs scored in one over in First-Class cricket and List A. ALSO READ | Diwali 2018: PM Narendra Modi celebrates with soldiers near India-China border in UttarakhandIn 1990, a First-Class game in New Zealand saw Bert Vance, playing for Wellington concede 77 runs in one over against Canterbury in the final. In another instance, a Dhaka Second Division Cricket League game between Axiom and Lalmatia saw Sujon Mahmud of Lalmatia concede a whopping 92 runs in just four balls. He bowled 65 wides and delivered 15 no-balls and in the four legitimate balls, the batsmen hit 12 runs. last_img read more

Annenberg students partner with online media site

first_imgThe Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism has partnered with AOL’s online news source, Patch.com, as part of a new PatchU program, which unites the site with 13 journalism programs at universities across the nation.Patch provides comprehensive hyperlocal news to cities that typically do not receive much media attention, said William Nance, vice president of developing business group at Patch Media.“We’re committed to being a member of the community. That’s how we build business up,” he said.The hyperlocal business model of reporting news in specific cities has helped Patch grow into a trusted news source for local issues in cities around the nation, Nance said.Since it began reporting in three cities in New Jersey in February 2009, Patch has grown to cover the news in numerous cities across 16 states and Washington, D.C. Patch launched a site in its 100th community in August, and AOL announced plans to expand to more than 500 neighborhoods in 20 states by the end of the year.To help reach out to a different kind of community, Patch began the PatchU program, where journalism students will work with Patch editors to report on local news in areas near their campuses.“Over time we expect to expand to other universities,” Nance said. “It helps us become a part of the discussions around the future of journalism.”Annenberg’s involvement with PatchU began when Marcia Parker, West Coast editorial director for Patch, collaborated with Sandy Tolan, an associate professor of journalism at Annenberg, after the two worked together on a state-wide investigative reporting project in March.“We talked about how we could do something that was really local but also had depth,” Tolan said. “I originally thought of the idea of having all the reporting for one class be in one square mile of a city.”Now a reality, Tolan’s “One Square Mile” launched this fall with eight students who cover one square mile of Westfield in Culver City.“It’s not really like a class; I consider it more of an editor-reporter relationship. It’s almost run as workshops that try to replicate what it’s like in the newsroom,” Tolan said.Students are responsible for hunting down stories about education, crime, entertainment and culture in the area, Tolan said. She and Parker edit the students’ stories before sending them to local Patch editors who cover Culver City.“We’re inventing this [project] as we go — the spirit of invention and innovation is at the heart of this,” Tolan said. “We’re among a group of schools that are trying to help lead students into an uncertain world of multimedia journalism.”School of Journalism Director Geneva Overholser said the partnership fits into a larger scope of collaborations between USC and other media organizations.“This class creates interesting journalism at a time when journalism is reinventing itself,” she said. “One of the most promising aspects [of new journalism] is collaborations.”Tolan agreed that this project is a way for Annenberg to help lead students into an uncertain world of multimedia journalism.Because Patch feels the pressure of the changes and challenges in the field of journalism, it has enlisted the help of the universities through PatchU, Nance said.“Annenberg is one of the top journalism programs in the U.S.,” he said. “We’ve got such a focus on good journalists; Patch wants to make sure they have good partnerships with good journalism programs.”So far, there are no set plans for Annenberg to continue with the PatchU program after this semester, Overholser said. Patch hopes, however, that this partnership will continue to benefit both itself and Annenberg, Nance said.“It helps [Patch] become a part of the discussions around the future of journalism [and] what content and economic models will work,” Nance said. “We want to be in a relationship where these conversations are occurring.”last_img read more