Syracuse speeds up play in 2nd half to beat Hartwick

first_imgIt’s not that Syracuse’s forwards didn’t want to shoot, they just couldn’t find the space.If an Orange player was anywhere near striking distance, three Hartwick defenders crowded around him. The crowd begged for a shot, but there was no space for SU to operate in the attacking third. As each hollow opportunity passed, a tactical adjustment became increasingly inevitable.But when head coach Ian McIntyre stood in front of his team after a scoreless first half, a tactical adjustment wasn’t on his mind. Instead, he urged his team to speed up its play and seize the opportunity to entertain the home crowd.“He said we had to impose ourselves, because this is our home field,” said junior midfielder Nick Perea. “We had to play faster because that’s our game.”And that’s exactly what the Orange did.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn the heels of a sloppy first half, an increase in energy was what No. 20 Syracuse (2-0-0) needed to edge Hartwick (0-1-1) 2-0 at SU Soccer Stadium on Monday night. In its first home game of the season, the Orange looked slow and, at times, confused in the early going. But once SU found its speedy identity, the Hawks simply couldn’t keep up.“We started slow, we were definitely sluggish,” McIntyre said. “We had a lot of possession, but didn’t create enough quality chances. When we broke their initial line of pressure, we started to look good and get those opportunities.”The Orange’s abundance of first-half possessions was mired by Hartwick’s swarming defense.In the 20th minute, SU slowed down play considerably. Sophomore Stefanos Stamoulacatos, freshman Alex Halis and junior Jordan Murrell played tic-tac-toe on the left side of the field while the Hawks’ defense sat in an impenetrable pyramid.At a distance, the Orange’s quick passing was pleasing to the eye. But when any player attempted to dribble toward the box, the once distinguishable pyramid turned into an amoeba around the ball.“That was because we were playing slower and building through the back,” said junior forward Grant Chong. “They definitely pressured us, which we expected, we just had to break in and I think we did successfully.”It was Chong, in the 50th minute, who took SU out of its slow start and onto the scoreboard. He settled a lob pass from Halis, took two dribbles and unleashed a rocket into the top-right corner.Hartwick goalie Mateo Munarriz made a leaping effort, but it was placed too perfectly. Chong threw his hands into the air and his teammates quickly mobbed him at the top of the Hawks’ box.That was all Syracuse needed to catapult itself into a more comfortable, effective philosophy.“In the second half, it was about keeping the tempo high,” McIntyre said. “Getting that first goal, and then eventually the second, helped us do that.”As the game wore on, SU didn’t possess the ball as methodically as it did in the first half. But the possessions it did have were more purposeful, as evidenced by the game’s decisive goals.Nine minutes after Chong gave the Orange the lead, Perea pushed the lead to 2-0. Once the Orange earned a throw-in in the attacking third, Murrell scanned the field for a target.With most of Hartwick’s players casually walking with their heads down, Perea stepped into open space and Murrell put the ball at his feet. It was the space that wasn’t there in the first half, when the Hawks subjected the Orange to its smothering brand of soccer.Perea’s shot deflected off of a cluster of defenders and found the back of the net.The Orange relished in the few moments when Hartwick’s defense wasn’t set, and a few moments was all it needed.Said Perea: “The second half was the way we should have played all along. We had a slow start, but it all came together when it needed to.” Comments Published on September 3, 2013 at 12:09 am Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesse Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Team Wilderness Traverse.com tops 2011 Raid the North Extreme

first_imgTeam Wilderness Traverse.com was clearly the cream of the crop at the 2011 Raid the North Extreme.The Canadian/New Zealand squad (team captain Bob Miller and Jakob Van Dorp of Ontario and Sarah Fairmaid and Gordon Blythen of New Zealand) dominated the field to capture bragging rights when the race finished Sunday in Trail.Team Wilderness Traverse.com received their first-place hardware during an award’s banquet Sunday at the Riverbell Restaurant in Trail.The second-place finisher was Wild Rose, consisting of captain Mike Brown and Veronica Jarlehag of Calgary, Bart Jarmula of Revelstoke and Cranbrook’s James Hielman.The DART-Nuun-Sportmulti from the United States — team captain Cyril Jay-Rayon of Los Angeles, Matt Hayes of Port Orchard, Wash., Mari Chandler of Zephyr Cove, Nev., and Aaron Rinnm of Redmond, Wash. — took the bronze medal edging out the Canadian team Atmosphere MOMAR.Atmosphere MOMAR consists of captain Pete Cameron and Leanne Mueller of Bolton, Ont., James Galipeau of Ottawa and Jean-Yves Dionne of Gatineau, Que.Raid the North Extreme is a six-day, non-stop expedition race, featuring four-person co-ed teams from around the world.The goal is to navigate more than 500-kilometres of unmarked terrain through the Selkirk, Purcell and Monashee mountains. Teams faced extreme challenges including a rugged wilderness, team dynamics, sleep deprivation and gear failure as they bike, trek, paddle and use ropes to navigate their way to the finish line in Trail Sunday.The race started the race Sunday in Meadow Creek, north of Kaslo.A handful of teams did not finish the race, including Kootenay Kaos of Nelson. Kootenay Kaos consist of Team Kootenay Kaos consists of captain Nelson Rocha, Sasha Kalabis, Dustin Eagleston and Vince [email protected]last_img read more

Victoria doubles Arbutus to clinch Tier 3 Peewee Championships

first_imgVictoria doubled Arbutus of Vancouver 4-2 to capture the BC Hockey Tier 3 Peewee Championships Friday at the NDCC Arena.The win allowed the Island squad to complete the six-day championships with a 6-0 record. Victoria defeated Arbutus 8-5 in round robin action.The provincial champs got past South Okanagan 7-4 in semi final Thursday.Host Nelson finished the tournament with a 3-2 record after edging Whitehorse 3-2 in the final round robin contest Wednesday.The game was called with 12:06 remaining in the third period due to a power outage.In the bronze medal contest, South Okanagan edged Dawson Creek 3-1.The win avenged a 4-3 round robin loss to the Northern squad.last_img read more

Update: Fate of watershed rules still up in the air

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentThe Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission will meet at 10 a.m. Nov. 1, and likely decide whether to designate eight watersheds in northwest Ohio as “distressed.”While Farm Bureau does not believe the public will have an opportunity to comment, we do want to make members aware of the details if they are interested in attending. The meeting will be held at the Ohio Department of Agriculture, 8995 E Main Street, Reynoldsburg, in the Bromfield Administration Building.A special task group of the Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission met Oct. 25 to discuss an Ohio Department of Agriculture report intended to justify the designation. The task group declined to discuss a previously submitted Ohio Farm Bureau analysis that shows the criteria for declaring a watershed in distress have not been met.Group Chairman and OSWCC member Fred Cash will prepare a report on the group’s findings that will be presented to the full commission Nov. 1. Ohio State Vice President and CFAES Dean Cathann Kress will assist in preparing that report. At that meeting, the full commission may vote to approve or deny the designation or to conduct further study.In July, Gov. John Kasich issued an executive order to declare the watersheds to be distressed. The order is subject to approval by the commission. Upon advice from legislators, Farm Bureau, SWCDs and others, the commission chose to defer its decision pending the task group study. If approved, the designation would require 7,000 farmers to create nutrient management plans and restrict nutrient application.  Leave a Commentlast_img read more

How to Migrate Timelines Between Video Editing Applications

first_imgIn Resolve go to Session and click Render.Under the Easy Setup tab select Avid AAF Round Trip (this will still work in Premiere).After selecting your desired export codec you can simply hit “Render”.Once completed you can jump into premiere and import the AAF file which will pop up as a single sequence.If you have multiple timelines you will need to export multiple AAF files. The clips should automatically pop up in Premiere. If a clip pops up the “media offline” error box you can relink the file by simply right clicking and selecting Relink. This technique also works with XML files out of Resolve as well.FCPX to PremiereTo export from FCPX to Premiere you have to use Resolve Lite.In Final Cut Pro X go to File > Export XML where you will be asked to name and save a new .fcpxml file format. The new .fcpxml file can be imported into Resolve.In Resolve click Load and select your FCPXML file.A dialogue box will pop up, click Ok. You will now be able to see your clips in the timeline.Inside of Resolve go to Session and Click Render.Under the Easy Setup tab select Avid AAF Round Trip (this works for Premiere, don’t worry).After selecting your desired export codec you can simply hit render. Your clips will now render.Once completed you can jump into Premiere and import the AAF file which will pop up as a single sequence.If you have multiple timelines you will need to export multiple AAF files. The clips should automatically pop up in Premiere.Migrating Timelines To FCPXPremiere to FCPXTo import Premiere Timelines into FCPX you must convert your Premiere project to a .fcpxml file format. The best way to use this is via DaVinci Resolve Lite which is free.In Premiere go to File>Export>AAF, choose a name, and click save.You can now import the .aaf file into Resolve Lite.Once inside Resolve go to Session>Export.In the dropdown menu Select Final Cut Pro XML Round Trip.Now select all the clips you want to send to Final Cut Pro and hit “start render”.Now jump back into FCPX and go to File>Import>XML.Avid to FCPX Move your video editing sequences from one application to another using these quick workflows.In an ideal world you would be able to open any video editing project file in any program, but it’s not that simple. Each video editing application has it’s own set of tools, workflow and effects, so the round tripping process is somewhat convoluted. This is where AAF and XML files come into play.AAF and XML files are designed to help migrate sequences between video editing apps. They make it possible to go from FCPX to Resolve to Avid to Premiere and anything in-between. However, there is a specific workflow that should be followed for each migration to ensure success. In the following post we will take a step-by-step look at the migration process between the big 4 editing softwares: Avid, Premiere, Resolve, and FCPX.For some of these workflows you will have to use DaVinci Resolve Lite as a bridge program. Thankfully Resolve Lite is free from BlackmagicDesign’s site.Migrating Timelines To PremiereAvid to PremiereImporting Avid sequences into Premiere is easy.In Avid, with your sequence or master clip selected in the bin, right click and hit “export.When the box pops up select “Untitled” from the dropdown menu and click the box that says “Options”.Under the “Export As” dropdown you can select AAF, click save.You will now be able to import the AAF file into Premiere. You can find out more information about this workflow by going to Avid’s site.Resolve to Premiere Migrating Timelines To ResolveFCPX to Resolve In Avid, with your sequence or master clip selected in the bin, right-click and hit “export.When the box pops up select “Untitled” from the dropdown menu and click the box that says options.Under the Export As dropdown you can select AAF and click save.You will now be able to import the AAF file into Resolve.In Resolve click the “Load” button.Select your AAF file and click Open.A dialogue box will pop up, click “Ok”. You should now see your Avid sequence in the timeline. Migrating Timelines To AvidResolve to Avid With your clips selected in Premiere go to File>Export>AAF.You will be asked to name the AAF file.You can now click import the file directly into Avid. Your sequence should auto populate the clips inside of Avid.FCPX to AvidTo export from FCPX to Avid you have to use Resolve Lite. Unfortunately this is the best workflow for going from FCPX to Avid.In Final Cut Pro X go to File > Export XML where you will be asked to name and save a new .fcpxml file format. The new .fcpxml file can be imported into Resolve.In Resolve click Load and select your FCPXML file.A dialogue box will pop up, click Ok.You will now be able to see your clips in the timeline.Inside of Resolve go to Session and Click Render.Under the Easy Setup tab select Avid AAF Round Trip.After selecting your desired export codec you can simply hit render. Your clips will now render.Once completed you can jump into Avid and import the AAF file which will pop up as a single sequence.If you have multiple timelines you will need to export multiple AAF files. The clips should automatically pop up in Avid. It’s a long process but it works.Have any other tips for migrating sequences between editing software? Share in the comments below.Resources:FCP X: Transfer Projects to Premiere Pro CC – Larry JordanExporting Projects for Other Applications – Adobe PremiereRound-Tripping with Avid Media Composer – Video 2 Brain In Final Cut Pro X go to File > Export XML where you will be asked to name and save a new .fcpxml file format.The new .fcpxml file can be imported into Resolve.In Resolve click Load and select your FCPXML file.A dialogue box will pop up, click “Ok”. You will now be able to see your clips in the timeline.Premiere to ResolveThe workflow from Premiere to Resolve is incredibly easy. Because Premiere has the ability to save AAF files or XML files you have options because Resolve accepts both AAF and XML files.In Premiere go to File>Export> AAF or XML.Save your file in the pop-up box.Jump to Resolve and click the Load button.You can now select either your AAF or XML file, select “Open”.A box will pop up, click Ok. You should now see your Premiere sequence in the timeline.Avid to Resolve Inside of Resolve go to Session and Click Render.Under the Easy Setup tab select Avid AAF Round Trip.After selecting your desired export codec you can simply hit render. Your clips will now render.Once completed you can jump into Avid and import the AAF file which will pop up as a single sequence.If you have multiple timelines you will need to export multiple AAF files. The clips should pop up in Avid.Premiere to Avid With your sequence or master clip selected in the bin right-click and hit “export”.When the box pops up select “Untitled” from the dropdown menu and click the box that says options.Under the ‘Export As’ dropdown you can select AAF and click save.FCPX can’t read AAF files so you will have to use DaVinci Resolve Lite, but don’t worry it’s free. You will now be able to import the AAF file into Resolve.In Resolve go to Session>Export.In the dropdown menu Select “Final Cut Pro XML Round Trip”.Now select all the clips you want to send to Final Cut Pro and hit “Start Render”. Your new .fcpxml file should be made.Now jump back into FCPX and go to File>Import>XML. You can now import the .fcpxml file in FCPX.Resolve to FCPXExporting to FCPX is easy in Resolve.Go to Session>Export.In the render settings dropdown menu labeled “Easy Setup” select “Final Cut Pro XML Round-Trip”.Now select all your clips in the timeline and hit “Start Render”.Resolve will create a .fcpxml file that you can now import into Final Cut Pro X.To do this in FCPX go to File>Import>XML and select your new .fcpxml file. You should now see your video clips in the timeline.last_img read more

Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games: India leads opening ceremony parade

first_imgVijay Kumar leads the Indian contingent during the opening ceremony for the 2014 Commonwealth Games at Celtic Park in Glasgow, Scotland, July 23, 2014. Photo by Phil Noble(Reuters)The opening ceremony of the 2014 Commonwealth Games kicked off with a glittering start on Wednesday with India leading the parade by virtue of being the hosts in the previous edition.The Indian contingent was led by London Olympics silver-medallist shooter Vijay Kumar around the Celtic Park.India’s female athletes were dressed in green sarees and sported the team blazer, the males proudly flaunted the red turbans.India were followed by Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives, Malaysia, Pakistan and Brunei.This year, 71 nations will compete in 18 disciplines at 13 venues of the games from July 23 – August 3.In the previous edition of the games in Delhi, India won a total of 101 medals – 38 gold, 27 silver, 36 bronze, and finished second behind Australia.The ceremony will also celebrate the diversity of Glasgow and what the city and Scotland have in common with the 70 other competing nations.From whisky, golf, Dolly the Sheep, marmalade, fountain pens and the Kelvin Scale, some of Scotland’s finest exports will be exhibited during the opening ceremony at the Celtic Park, which is the home of Celtic Football Club.last_img read more

Zidane Now Says He is Counting on Bale at Real Madrid

first_imgMADRID — Less than a month after saying Gareth Bale’s transfer would be good for everyone, Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane has called the Wales forward an important player for his squad.Zidane said Friday he is counting on Bale for the season that begins for Real Madrid with a visit to Celta Vigo in the Spanish league on Saturday.“It looked like he was going to leave but now he is here with us,” Zidane said. “Things change. I will count on him. He has a good record and is an important player and I hope that all the players want to make it difficult for me to pick the team.”Zidane last month stated his desire to get rid of Bale by saying the club was negotiating the player’s transfer and that his exit would be “better for everyone’s sake.”Madrid in 2013 paid a then world-record fee of 100 million euros (then $132 million) to sign Bale from English club Tottenham.Zidane also said he is “happy” to have playmaker James Rodríguez in the squad despite talks he could still be transferred after the loan to Bayern Munich ended last season.“I will repeat what I said the other day, I will count on everyone who is here,” Zidane said. “They are also happy to be here.”TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

ALLDAQ: USB 3.0 SuperSpeed isolator for industry and audio

first_img Continue Reading Previous SINTRONES: ABOX-5000G1 features GPU computing with CUDA technologyNext MACOM: 400Gbps chipset for short reach optical connectivity applications ALLDAQ presents USB 3.0 isolators supporting the full USB 3.0 SuperSpeed data rate of 5 Gigabit/s. The new re-clocking technology guarantees a stable USB connection for all speeds. With it also USB 3.0 SuperSpeed devices can be electrically isolated from the host PC at full performance. The isolators can be universally used for electrical isolation of USB measurement instruments, to avoid ground loops in industry and automotive area as well as in professional studio and event technology e. g. for streaming of numerous audio tracks via USB audio interfaces.The USB isolators of the ADQ-USB 3.0-ISO series detects automatically, whether it is a SuperSpeed (5 Gbit/s), High-Speed (480 Mbit/s), Full-Speed (12 Mbit/s) or Low-Speed (1,5 Mbit/s) connection. The isolation voltage between PC and USB device is 1 kV (continuously) for the model ADQ-USB 3.0-ISO and 1.6 kV (< 60 s) for the model ADQ-USB 3.0-ISO-W. The ESD protection of the data lines is ensured by transient-voltage-suppression diodes up to ±15 kV according to IEC 61000-4-2. Without an external power supply the USB isolator can source 200 mA maximum at the device port. However, for most USB devices an external power supply is required providing 900 mA according to the USB 3.0 specification. The model ADQ-USB 3.0-ISO is sourced via an +5 V power adapter with a lockable 5.5 mm barrel connector (bayonet lock) for a safe power supply. Especially for industrial and automotive applications a version with wide range input from 10 to 36 VDC is provided. Here the power supply is fed via a 2-pin Phoenix type connector. The external power input is protected against reverse polarity and short-circuit proof. The ALLDAQ USB 3.0 isolators are supported under Windows, MAC OS and Linux.Due to the robust aluminium housing and an operating temperature from -20 to +70°C, the USB 3.0 isolator is also suitable for applications in harsh environments. With the ADQ-USB 3.0-ISO you can protect your computer and USB devices effectively against interference voltages and avoid ground loops. Typical applications are: electrical isolation between measurement instrument and PC, rejection of ripple pickup in studio technology, de-coupling of different ground potential in industrial control technology and protection against voltage peaks in automotive area.With the ALLDAQ USB 3.0 isolators a double-shielded USB 3.0 cable (USB 3.0-A male connector to USB 3.0-B male connector) and a short description are included. The devices are manufactured in Germany according to highest quality standards.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Chips & Components last_img read more

National Touch League To Return To Coffs Harbour

first_imgCoffs Harbour has won the right after an extremely competitive tender process which included multiple tenders from across New South Wales. The event returns to Coffs Harbour, with the city previously having hosted the NTL event from 1997 through to 2008. Further information can be obtained from the Media Release. While you are in Coffs Harbour for the 2013 X-Blades National Touch League, there are plenty of things to see and do away from the fields. To find out more about Coffs Harbour’s attractions, please visit the following websites:www.destinationnsw.com.au www.coffscoast.com.au Related Files2013_and_2014_ntl_announcement-pdflast_img read more