9 months agoMarseille urged to move for Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayi

first_imgTagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Marseille urged to move for Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayiby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFrench pundit Pierre Menes has urged Olympique Marseille to re-sign Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayi.The Belgian has just had his loan at Valencia cut short and will not be returning to the Blues.Instead, Valencia are helping Batshuayi to find a new club.Menes, meanwhile, says OM should move for him:Houhou l’OM c’est pas une bonne idée ça? RT @lequipe Valence : Michy Batshuayi officiellement indésirable https://t.co/htcZe4MFrI— Pierre Ménès (@PierreMenes) January 10, 2019 last_img read more

Bill Nighy Supports The Robin Hood Tax

first_imgWith the names of politicians and the rich and famous making the headlines since the Panama Papers scandal, tax avoidance is front and centre on the minds of many, including some with the power to do something about it.In mid-June, a collection of countries are scheduled to introduce a financial transaction tax (FTT) called the Robin Hood Tax. This tax collected on financial transactions is to go towards the protection of public services, and to tackle poverty and climate change.Actor Bill Nighy has appeared on the front page of e-activist petition #TheTimeIsNow, where it says that leaders aren’t saying how much the tax will be because of pressure from banks. Those in favour of the tax are welcome to go to The Time Is Now webpage and fill in the rest of the statement, which begins: “The time is now for an FTT because…” The petition’s goal for 5,000 signatures is over half way there. The best reasons proposed will be sent directly to leaders.“History could be made this year with a tiny tax on transactions,” says Nighy. “They have a chance to make a profound and historic change in the way we order a chronically imbalanced world.”Copyright ©2016Look to the Starslast_img read more

A US federal appeals court has ruled that Netflix

first_imgA US federal appeals court has ruled that Netflix has been getting preferential treatment for the delivery of its TV series and movies through the post.The court agreed with video games delivery service Gamefly, which had complained that an extra charge was being levied by the US Postal Service for handling its deliveries because the material in question could not go through the automated sorting system.Netflix’s deliveries also bypass the system, but it has not been subject to the extra charge.The Postal Regulatory Commission must now come up with a fair system, the court ruled.However, Netflix stock rose in the immediate aftermath of the ruling as the Commission said that the amount the Postal Service charges to deliver its DVDs will not be increased for the time being.The Postal Service said the pricing structure it has for different clients were reasonable and fair and that it is studying the court’s decision. Netflix is the Service’s largest DVD delivery customer.last_img read more

Study Wide and varied body of evidence support best practices in palliative

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 1 2018A study commissioned to help guide revisions of best practices in providing palliative care finds that there is a wide and varied body of evidence to support such clinical practice guidelines.The systematic review by researchers from the RAND Corporation found that the research base for palliative care was larger than generally appreciated, although there was limited evidence across some areas of clinical practice such as how to care for patients during the last days of their lives.Published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, the study was conducted to support the fourth edition of the National Consensus Project’s Clinical Practices Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care, which establishes best practices in end-of-life care. While previous guidelines have been developed through consensus among experts, the systematic review was incorporated into the just-released fourth edition of the guidelines.”Our review will help guide best practices going forward and help focus future research efforts to build a high-quality evidence base for end-of-life care,” said Sangeeta Ahluwalia, the study’s lead author and a senior policy researcher at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. “While the palliative care evidence base has been rapidly growing, we now better understand where there are gaps.”Palliative care is a rapidly growing field aimed at improving quality of life for patients with serious illness and their caregivers. Inpatient palliative care programs have increased sharply in recent years, with two-thirds of hospitals with 50 or more beds reporting that they have an interdisciplinary palliative care team.Researchers from the Southern California Evidence-based Practice Center at RAND reviewed the research literature to assess the status of evidence across eight domains of palliative care: the structure and process of care; physical aspects of care; psychological aspects of care; social aspects of care; spiritual, religious and existential aspects of care; cultural aspects of care; care of the patient nearing the end of life; and ethical and legal aspects of care.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyGender biases are extremely common among health care professionalsIntroduction of default physician order reduces unnecessary imaging for cancer patientsThe most promising approaches to palliative care structure and process identified by the review include home-based palliative care, interdisciplinary team care and telehealth interventions. The findings support continued growth in these areas, with attention needed on workforce expansion, quality assessment of these services and innovative payment models.The study also found there is now documented evidence for comprehensive palliative care and music/art therapy addressing physical and psychological aspects of care. However, the existing evidence base for social needs assessments and culturally-sensitive care remains very limited.There is also documented evidence that grief and bereavement support services appear to improve key outcomes for caregivers, but the evidence base for effective approaches for care focused on the last days of life is very limited.Evidence for physician orders and advance directive interventions showed the strongest evidence in the ethical and legal aspects of care domain. Ethics consultations improve consensus in the intensive care unit, which can help reduce use of high-intensity and often life-prolonging treatments at the end of life.”Our review documents a substantial body of evidence to support clinical practice guidelines for palliative care, but the quality of evidence remains limited,” said Susanne Hempel, the study’s senior author and co-director of the Evidence-based Practice Center at RAND. “This comprehensive review underscores the importance of targeting future research toward building high-quality evidence in key areas of clinical practice, and patient and caregiver needs.” Source:https://www.rand.org/news/press/2018/10/31/index1.htmllast_img read more

Hightech brain surgery improves quality of life for people with Parkinsons disease

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 9 2018A high-tech form of brain surgery that replaces scalpels with sound waves improved quality of life for people with Parkinson’s disease that has resisted other forms of treatment, a new study has found.Further, the University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers conclude their study offers “comprehensive evidence of safety” in terms of the approach’s effect on mood, behavior and cognitive ability, areas largely neglected in previous research.”In our initial study that looked at the outcomes of focused ultrasound surgery in Parkinson’s disease, we primarily described post-operative improvements in motor symptoms, specifically tremor,” said Scott Sperling, PsyD, a clinical neuropsychologist at UVA. “In this study, we extended these initial results and showed that focused ultrasound thalamotomy is not only safe from a cognitive and mood perspective, but that patients who underwent surgery realized significant and sustained benefits in terms of functional disability and overall quality of life.”Focused Ultrasound and Parkinson’s DiseaseFocused ultrasound, as the procedure is known, has already been approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of essential tremor, the most common movement disorder. That approval came after a pioneering international study led by UVA neurosurgeon Jeff Elias, MD. He and his colleagues have since demonstrated the technology’s potential in reducing tremor in people with drug-resistant Parkinson’s disease. The goal is to use focused sound waves to interrupt the faulty brain circuits responsible for the uncontrollable shaking associated with the disease.The new study looked at the effects on 27 adults, all with severe Parkinson’s tremor that had not responded to previous treatment. The study participants were initially divided into two groups. Twenty received the procedure, while seven received a fake procedure, to serve as a control group. (The seven in the control group were later offered the opportunity to receive the real procedure, and all but one did.)After receiving the procedure, study participants reported improved quality of life at both three months and 12 months. “After surgery, patients experienced significant improvements in multiple aspects of quality of life, including their ability to perform simple daily tasks, emotional well-being and the sense of stigma they experienced due to their tremor,” Sperling said. “Our results suggest that post-operative improvements in tremor lead to very meaningful improvements in day-to-day functioning and, subsequently, to better overall quality of life.”The Effects on Mood and MemoryRelated StoriesTransobturator sling surgery shows promise for stress urinary incontinenceBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemThe study was notable for its in-depth examination of the psychological and cognitive effects of the procedure, areas that have received relatively little attention in previous research.The researchers found that mood and cognition, and the ability to go about daily life, ultimately had more effect on participants’ assessment of their overall quality of life than did their tremor severity or the amount of tremor improvement seen after the procedure.”A person’s perception of their quality of life is shaped in many different ways,” Sperling said. “Mood and behavioral symptoms, such as depression, anxiety and apathy, often have a greater impact on quality of life than the measurable severity of one’s tremor.”The only cognitive declines seen in participants followed through the study were in how quickly they were able to name colors and think of and speak words. The cause of this was unclear, though the researchers suggested this could be a result of the natural progression of Parkinson’s. (Focused ultrasound is being tested to address the tremor associated with the disease, not its other symptoms.)The researchers noted that their study was limited by its small size and the fact that participants’ medication dosing varied, among other factors.To become available as a treatment for medication-resistant Parkinson’s, the approach would need approval from the FDA. UVA’s new research is an important step in that process. Source:https://newsroom.uvahealth.com/2018/11/05/scalpel-free-surgery-improves-quality-of-life-for-people-with-parkinsons-study-finds/last_img read more

Exposure to chemical in weedkiller Roundup raises risk of some cancers study

first_img Source:http://www.washington.edu/news/2019/02/13/uw-study-exposure-to-chemical-in-roundup-increases-risk-for-cancer/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 14 2019Exposure to glyphosate–the world’s most widely used, broad-spectrum herbicide and the primary ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup–increases the risk of some cancers by more than 40 percent, according to new research from the University of Washington.Various reviews and international assessments have come to different conclusions about whether glyphosate leads to cancer in humans.The research team conducted an updated meta-analysis–a comprehensive review of existing literature–and focused on the most highly exposed groups in each study. They found that the link between glyphosate and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma is stronger than previously reported.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemTheir findings were published this month in the online journal Mutation Research/Reviews in Mutation Research.”Our analysis focused on providing the best possible answer to the question of whether or not glyphosate is carcinogenic,” said senior author Lianne Sheppard, a professor in the UW departments of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences and Biostatistics. “As a result of this research, I am even more convinced that it is.”By examining epidemiologic studies published between 2001 and 2018, the team determined that exposure to glyphosate may increase the risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by as much as 41 percent. The authors focused their review on epidemiological research in humans but also considered the evidence from laboratory animals.”This research provides the most up-to-date analysis of glyphosate and its link with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, incorporating a 2018 study of more than 54,000 people who work as licensed pesticide applicators,” said co-author Rachel Shaffer, a UW doctoral student in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences.”These findings are aligned with a prior assessment from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which classified glyphosate as a ‘probable human carcinogen’ in 2015,” Shaffer said.Glyphosate first was introduced as an herbicide in 1974. Usage in the agricultural industry has soared, particularly since the mid-2000s when the practice of “green burndown” was introduced, in which glyphosate-based herbicides are applied to crops shortly before harvest. As a consequence, crops are now likely to have higher residues of glyphosate.Researchers say more studies are needed to account for the effects of increased exposures from green burndown, which may not be fully captured in the existing studies reviewed in this new publication.last_img read more

Broadcom raises hostile bid for Qualcomm to 121 bn Update

Broadcom CEO Hock Tan is seen at a November 6 White House meeting with President Donald Trump, at which Tan announced plans to move the chipmaking company back to the United States Broadcom raised its bid for rival computer chipmaker Qualcomm on Monday to $121 billion, offering the richest-ever takeover effort in the tech sector in an effort to become the dominant player in the fast-growing market for connected devices. Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf, seen in December. has said he sees “no path to value” in a tie-up with rival chipmaking giant Broadcom Explore further Qualcomm to reviewQualcomm said in a statement it had received the new proposal and would evaluate it “consistent with its fiduciary duties” and “in consultation with its financial and legal advisors.”Up to now, Qualcomm has rejected the tie-up, with CEO Steve Mollenkopf arguing last year there was “no real path to value” with Broadcom.Mollenkopf, in comments in December, maintained that Qualcomm, the leading global supplier of smartphone chips, is well-positioned for emerging technologies for connected devices and 5G, or the fifth generation of wireless networks.If completed, the deal would be the largest-ever in the tech sector and create a powerful player in the booming sector fueled by growth in smartphones and an array of connected devices from cars to wearables. Any merger deal would need to pass muster with Qualcomm shareholders and could face regulatory scrutiny in the United States and other markets.Broadcom said its offer stood whether Qualcomm’s $47 billion bid for Dutch rival NXP was completed or is terminated. European regulators this month said they had approved the merger subject to conditions.The Singapore-based firm said it was prepared to pay a “significant” fee to Qualcomm if the two companies agree but the deal is blocked by regulators.It also said it would offer a “ticking fee” giving Qualcomm shareholders extra cash if the deal is not consummated within a year.Broadcom’s November 6 proposal followed a visit by its CEO to the White House, where he met President Donald Trump and announced plans to move the tech company back to the United States from Singapore.Broadcom moved from California in 2015 after a merger with rival Avago Technologies.The move by Broadcom comes with Qualcomm facing a series of investigations by antitrust authorities around the world over its dominance in the market for smartphone chips, and a legal tussle with Apple over royalties. Qualcomm rejects Broadcom’s nominees to board Singapore-based Broadcom, which has begun a process to reincorporate in the United States, called the hostile bid its “best and final offer.”The price hike steps up the pressure on California-based Qualcomm, the dominant producer of chips for mobile devices, which is set to hold its annual shareholders meeting next month.In a letter to Qualcomm board members, Broadcom chief executive Hock Tan called the offer “extremely compelling compared to any other alternative available to Qualcomm” and called on the board to open talks on the proposal. But he said the deal would be off the table if it fails to win approval next month by shareholders.The new bid represents $82 per Qualcomm share, up from a previous offer of $70 a share, and was said to be 50 percent higher than Qualcomm’s share price before the tie-up was proposed in November.With Qualcomm’s debt included, the deal’s value would be some $146 billion.”We continue to hope you choose to engage with us for the benefit of your stockholders,” Tan said.”However, we will withdraw this proposal and cease our pursuit of Qualcomm immediately following your upcoming annual meeting unless we have entered into a definitive agreement or the Broadcom-nominated slate is elected.”Broadcom last year proposed a slate of 11 new Qualcomm board members as part of its effort to win approval. © 2018 AFP Citation: Broadcom raises hostile bid for Qualcomm to $121 bn (Update) (2018, February 5) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-broadcom-qualcomm-billion.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

CEO Zuckerberg apologizes for Facebooks privacy failures

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) Citation: CEO Zuckerberg apologizes for Facebook’s privacy failures (2018, April 11) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-ceo-zuckerberg-facebook-privacy-failures.html No need. “That was pretty good,” he said of the exchange with Cruz.For the most part, his careful but generally straightforward answers, steeped in the sometimes arcane details of Facebook’s underlying functions, often deflected aggressive questioning. When the going got tough, Zuckerberg was able to fall back on: “Our team should follow up with you on that, Senator.”As a result, he found it relatively easy to return to familiar talking points: Facebook made mistakes, he and his executives are very sorry, and they’re working very hard to correct the problems and safeguard the users’ data.As for the federal Russia probe that has occupied much of Washington’s attention for months, he said he had not been interviewed by special counsel Mueller’s team, but “I know we’re working with them.” He offered no details, citing a concern about confidentiality rules of the investigation.Earlier this year Mueller charged 13 Russian individuals and three Russian companies in a plot to interfere in the 2016 presidential election through a social media propaganda effort that included online ad purchases using U.S. aliases and politicking on U.S. soil. A number of the Russian ads were on Facebook. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) At the hearing, Zuckerberg said: “We didn’t take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I’m sorry. I started Facebook, I run it, and I’m responsible for what happens here.”He outlined steps the company has taken to restrict outsiders’ access to people’s personal information. He also said the company is investigating every app that had access to a large amount of information before the company moved to prevent such access in 2014—actions that came too late in the Cambridge Analytica case. Life-sized cutouts depicting Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wearing “Fix Fakebook” T-shirts are displayed by advocacy group, Avaaz, on the South East Lawn of the Capitol on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, ahead of Zuckerberg’s appearance before a Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees joint hearing. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) Under fire for the worst privacy debacle in his company’s history, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg batted away often-aggressive questioning from lawmakers who accused him of failing to protect the personal information of millions of Americans from Russians intent on upsetting the U.S. election. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) An aide to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg closes a binder of notes left on the table as Zuckerberg takes a short break from testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) An aide to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg closes a binder of notes left on the table as Zuckerberg takes a short break from testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Republicans have yet to get behind any legislation, but that could change.Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., asked Zuckerberg if he would be willing to work with lawmakers to examine what “regulations you think are necessary in your industry.”Absolutely, Zuckerberg responded, saying later in an exchange with Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, that “I’m not the type of person who thinks that all regulation is bad.”Ahead of the hearing, John Cornyn of Texas, the No. 2 Republican in the Senate, said, “This is a serious matter, and I think people expect us to take action.” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo, Alex Brandon) Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Zuckerberg says company working with Mueller probe (Update) Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg smiles while testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) At times, he showed plenty of steel. After aggressive questioning about Facebook’s alleged political bias from Sen. Ted Cruz, for instance, Zuckerberg was asked if he was ready to take a break. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg smiles while testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pauses while testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Explore further In all, he skated largely unharmed through his first day of congressional testimony. He’ll face House questioners Wednesday.The 33-year-old founder of the world’s best-known social media giant appeared in a suit and tie, a departure from the T-shirt he’s famous for wearing in public as well as in private. Even so, his youth cast a sharp contrast with his often-elderly, gray-haired Senate inquisitors. And the enormous complexity of the social network he created at times defeated the attempts of legislators to hammer him on Facebook’s specific failures and how to fix them.The stakes are high for both Zuckerberg and his company. Facebook has been reeling from its worst-ever privacy failure following revelations last month that the political data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica, which was affiliated with Trump’s 2016 campaign, improperly scooped up data on some 87 million users. Zuckerberg has been on an apology tour for most of the past two weeks, culminating in his congressional appearance Tuesday.Although shaky at times, Zuckerberg seemed to gain confidence as the day progressed. An iconic figure as a billionaire entrepreneur who changed the way people around the world relate to each other, he made a point of repeatedly referring back to the Harvard dorm room where he said Facebook was brought to life. Much of the effort was aimed at denigrating Democrat Hillary Clinton and thereby helping Republican Trump, or simply encouraging divisiveness and undercutting faith in the U.S. system.Zuckerberg said Facebook had been led to believe Cambridge Analytica had deleted the user data it had harvested and that had been “clearly a mistake.” He said Facebook had considered the data collection “a closed case” and had not alerted the Federal Trade Commission. He assured senators the company would handle the situation differently today.Separately, the company began alerting some of its users that their data was gathered by Cambridge Analytica. A notification that appeared on Facebook for some users Tuesday told them that “one of your friends” used Facebook to log into a now-banned personality quiz app called “This Is Your Digital Life.” The notice says the app misused the information, including public profiles, page likes, birthdays and current cities, by sharing it with Cambridge Analytica.In the hearings, Zuckerberg is trying to both restore public trust in his company and stave off federal regulations that some lawmakers have floated.Democrat Bill Nelson of Florida said he believes Zuckerberg was taking the congressional hearings seriously “because he knows there is going to be a hard look at regulation.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. During some five hours of Senate questioning Tuesday, Zuckerberg apologized several times for Facebook failures, disclosed that his company was “working with” special counsel Robert Mueller in the federal probe of Russian election interference and said it was working hard to change its own operations after the harvesting of users’ private data by a data-mining company affiliated with Donald Trump’s campaign.Seemingly unimpressed, Republican Sen. John Thune of South Dakota said Zuckerberg’s company had a 14-year history of apologizing for “ill-advised decisions” related to user privacy. “How is today’s apology different?” Thune asked.”We have made a lot of mistakes in running the company,” Zuckerberg conceded, and Facebook must work harder at ensuring the tools it creates are used in “good and healthy” ways.The controversy has brought a flood of bad publicity and sent the company’s stock value plunging, but Zuckerberg seemed to achieve a measure of success in countering that: Facebook shares surged 4.5 percent for the day, the biggest gain in two years. read more

Low visibility disrupts flight operations at Delhi airport

first_imgFILE PHOTO SHARE SHARE EMAIL December 25, 2018 COMMENT COMMENTS Low visibility conditions on Tuesday disrupted flight operations at the Delhi airport and departures were put on hold for two hours, an official said. Three international and one domestic flights have been diverted so far while arrivals have not been stopped, the official added. The minimum visibility required for take off is 125 metres. According to the official, since the Low Visibility Take Off (LVTO) requirement is not being fulfilled, departure of flights were on hold for two hours from around 0715 hours. Departure of flights resumed at 0916 hours. The Indira Gandhi International Airport is the busiest in the country and on an average sees more than 70 flight movements per hour. This includes both arrivals and departures. center_img Airport Published on Delhi SHARElast_img read more