RHO says his hands are tied, blames drug shortage on politics

first_imgRegion Three’s (Essequibo Islands-West Demerara) Regional Health Officer (RHO) is now claiming that the “political nature” of the community of De Kendren, West Coast Demerara (WCD,) is the contributing factor that has led to the Public Health Ministry not being able to implement the “Public Health agenda” at the health centre there.One of the pipes being used by the medical personnelGuyana Times had recently reported the woes that are plaguing the De Kendren Health Centre which had caused the doctor and nurses at the facility to down tools, refusing to work. One of those woes was a major drug shortage.The health centre’s Pharmacist, Jennifer Thompson, decried the medication shortage which she said has been ongoing for a lengthy period.Thompson relayed that on many occasions, and as a result of the shortage, she was forced to use her own monies to purchase drugs for patients at the centre.“We do not get the amount of drugs and our clinic people are using the drugs. I am working at another place and sometimes I have to bring drugs from that end to give my patients. Sometimes I have to take my own money, especially to buy the types of medication needed the most here. When you go to uplift drugs, they have your book long and when you do get the drugs, it is just a few things,” Thompson complained.However, the Region’s Health Officer, Dr Ravendra Dudhnath denied that there is a shortage at the facility and in the same breath reported that two former RHOs had informed that there were grave difficulties in implementing the “public health agenda in the predominantly agricultural community based on the nature of politics there”.According to the doctor, the reports given by the pharmacist and a pensioner who reported that since October last, he was unable to receive insulin from the facility, are false.Dr Dudhnath reiterated that there “is no shortage of drugs at the facility”.Additionally, the RHO blamed the Guyana Water Incorporated (GWI) and a dismantled trestle for the lack of water at the centre.Nurse Nikita Johnson had reported to this publication that in order for care to be provided to patients, nurses would be forced to fetch water from aback the facility’s yard which has not been cleaned for months and as such is “high with grass!”The angered nurse decried the punishment that has to be endured at her place of work explaining “out of the kindness of my heart I go at the back to climb up on a trestle to turn on a pipe to get some water. When that tank is empty, we have no water. The clinic attendant she usually does it because she has to wipe and clean and it is very unfair to her to be putting on a long boots to go where snakes and all different things that can attack her. And I said to myself that I am not doing it anymore! When it comes to the washroom, you gotta take a bucket and throw in water over the urine and faeces and what not and that is unsanitary!”The condition of the health centre’s yard, Dudhnath explained, is as a result of tenders being out for maintenance of the yard and as a consequence he cannot employ anyone to clear it of the overgrown weeds. The RHO said his hands are “tied”.As such, the medical personnel at the health centre are calling for the officials of the Health Ministry to send a team to visit to the facility.last_img read more

Europe to probe allegations about secret prisons

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Red Cross chief spokeswoman Antonella Notari said the agency asked Washington about the allegations and requested access to the prisons if they exist. The Red Cross, which has exclusive rights to visit terror suspects detained at a U.S. military base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, long has been concerned about reports that U.S. officials were hiding detainees from ICRC delegates. Europe’s top human rights organization, the Council of Europe, said it, too, would investigate. Notari said the Red Cross, which also monitors conditions at U.S. detention centers in Afghanistan and Iraq, has been unable to find some people who reportedly were detained. She said the Red Cross was “concerned about the fate of an unknown number of persons detained as part of what is called the ‘global war on terror’ and held in undisclosed places of detention.” In implicating Poland and Romania, Human Rights Watch examined flight logs of CIA aircraft from 2001 to 2004, said Mark Garlasco, a senior military analyst with the New York-based organization. He said the group matched the flight patterns with testimony from some of the hundreds of detainees in the war on terrorism who have been released by the United States. “The indications are that prisoners in Afghanistan are being (taken) to facilities in Europe and other countries in the world,” Garlasco, a former civilian intelligence officer with the Defense Intelligence Agency, told The Associated Press. BRUSSELS, Belgium – The European Union and the continent’s top human rights group said Thursday they will investigate allegations that the CIA set up secret jails in eastern Europe and elsewhere to interrogate terror suspects, and the Red Cross demanded access to any prisoners. Human Rights Watch said it has evidence, based on flight logs, that indicate the CIA transported suspects captured in Afghanistan to Poland and Romania. But the two countries – and others in the former Soviet bloc – denied the allegations. U.S. officials have refused to confirm or deny the claims. Such prisons, European officials say, would violate the continent’s human rights principles. At work may be a complex web of global politics, in which eastern European countries face choices between the views of the European Union and their interest in close ties with the United States. The International Committee of the Red Cross expressed strong interest in the claims, first reported Wednesday in the Washington Post, that the CIA has been hiding and interrogating some of its most important al-Qaida captives at Soviet-era compounds. He would not say how the organization obtained the flight logs, but said two destinations of the flights stood out as likely sites of any secret CIA detention centers: Szymany Airport in Poland, which is near the headquarters of Poland’s intelligence service; and Mihail Kogalniceanu military airfield in Romania. Human Rights Watch also obtained the tail numbers of dozens of CIA aircraft to match them with the flight logs, Garlasco said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more