5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday March 12 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Tuesday, March 12, 2019:#1) Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day EarlyThe Shriners are holding a St. Patrick’s Day Dinner Dance at the Shriners Auditorium (99 Fordham Road). A social hour begins at 6pm. Dinner starts at 7pm. The evening features an Irish dinner; music; and prizes. Tickets cost $25. For more information and to purchase tickets, contact 978-657-4202 x 216.#2) Red Cross Blood DriveThe Red Cross is holding a blood drive at Wilmington Friendship (Masonic) Lodge (32 Church Street) from 1pm to 7pm. Learn more HERE.#3) Paying The College Bill: Strategies To SaveThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a workshop on saving for college at 6:30pm. Jack Wang from Longhorn Financial LLC is back with this workshop reviewing different options to pay the college bill, ranging from loans to payment plans to other less known strategies. The pros and cons of each option will be discussed so participants can make an informed decision on which method is best for their family. For high school juniors, seniors & their parents. Register HERE.#4) How To Be A BeekeeperThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a lecture on beekeeping at 7pm. Join Julie Kelley, Wilmington native and owner of Tewksbury Honey, for a lively presentation and discussion about her favorite pollinators! This hour long program will feature information about honey bees, keeping bees, and, of course, honey and its benefits. Julie’s honey will be for sale at the end of the program. Register HERE.#5) Tour Of Wilmington Town MuseumThe Town Museum (430 Salem Street) is open from 10am to 2pm. Come explore Wilmington’s history. Free admission.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Friday, July 19, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, July 23, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, August 15, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday August 5 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Monday, August 5, 2019:#1) Revere Beach Memories At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting a talk on the history of Revere Beach at 2:30pm. Don’t miss this trip down memory lane. Revere Beach, established as America’s first public beach in 1896, was a place that created lasting memories for thousands of beach goers. The Revere Beach of old comes alive through photos and stories presented by Bob Upton, a Revere Beach enthusiast and historian. Join us for a night of history and nostalgia. Bring your own photos and stories to share as well. Register HERE.#2) The Ooch: Yo-Yos, Music & Dance At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hostingThe Ooch at 6:30pm. Yo-Yos, Music & Dance is a 60-minute show that combines three of Ooch’s favorite activities – yo-yo tricks, cool music and sweet dance moves. The show is half yo-yo tricks and half dance party. During the first part of the show, Ooch performs some of his favorite yo-yo tricks as well as takes requests from the audience. The second part of the show is “dance”. In Ooch’s world “dance” can mean MANY things like follow-along dance (where the audience copies Ooch’s movements to the music OR VICE VERSA), popular line dances such as the Cupid Shuffle, Cotton Eyed Joe, Cha Cha Slide & others, body percussion, Freeze Dance and even Hula Hoops to music . . . all to popular songs requested by the audience. Ages 4+. Register HERE.#3) Little Movers At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Little Movers session at 10am. Let’s move! Join us for a morning of singing, dancing, and moving around! Ages 1-2. Register HERE.#4) Learn To Sail Program BeginsAll hands on deck! The Wilmington Recreation Department’s ‘Learn to Sail’ program is returning this summer on the Charles River. Children age 10 – 18 are eligible to register for this class which offers classroom instruction and on-the-water education. New students are required to pass a swim test. The program will take place Monday, August 5, 2019 through Friday, August 9, 2019, from 10:30am to 4pm. The cost of the program is $150. To register, visit www.wilmingtonma.gov/recreation, call 978-658-4270, or stop by the Reference Department in Room 8 of Town Hall. The required registration form can be found HERE.#5) Public Health Museum’s Camp BeginsIs your high schooler interested in a career in medicine, infectious disease, or nursing? The Public Health Museum is inviting students to apply to OUTBREAK! 2019.  This week-long summer program is for Massachusetts high school students entering their junior and senior year as of Fall 2019. For the seventh year in a row, the program will be offered for FREE.The program is scheduled for August 5, 2019 to August 9, 2019 at the Public Health Museum in Tewksbury, Massachusetts.OUTBREAK! 2019 is an interactive, challenging program designed to introduce high school students to the history and importance of public health. Students will learn about epidemiology, investigate a simulated disease outbreak, learn about the wide range of public health careers, and more. Field trips include the State Public Health Laboratory in Jamaica Plain and additional other public health facilities.The Public Health Museum is a non-profit educational and cultural museum that strives to preserve records and artifacts from our nation’s public health history, educate the public about the achievements and contributions of public health, and inspire people to build upon the past and continue to advance the future of public health.Applications are available on line from the Museum’s website or by contacting the museum at 978-851-7321 ext. 2606 or phmuseum@gmail.com.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLIBRARY LINEUP: Storytime at Farmers Market on Aug. 4; Revere Beach Memories on Aug. 5In “Community”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, August 8, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, July 29, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Project Loon flies for 1 million hours

first_img Project Loon headed to help Puerto Rico Automation software collects wind forecast data, builds maps of where to travel and then processes each balloon’s observation so changes can be made to follow that map. It is this software that directs the balloon’s movements, not the 24/7 team of engineers monitoring them, head of Engineering Salvatore Candido said.According to Candido, the first time he saw a balloon deciding to zig where a human would have chosen to zag, he had to “stare for a while at the strategy the algorithm was trying to execute” before realizing he had been outsmarted by the software.”The first balloon allowed to fully execute this technique set a flight time record from Puerto Rico to Peru,” Candido said. “I had never simultaneously felt smarter and dumber at the same time.”Balloons also choose when to loiter in an area to wait for winds to change, and fly in figure 8 patterns to maintain a constant LTE signal over an area for longer periods. Now playing: Watch this: Tags Project Loon reached a massive milestone. Project Loon Alphabet’s Project Loon has reached the milestone of flying its balloons in the sky for a collective 1 million hours, the company announced Tuesday. This equates to 40 million kilometers travelled.Project Loon delivers mobile connectivity to remote and disaster-ravaged areas, with the balloons operated by a solar-powered pump. They drift on winds at heights of 50,000 feet to 70,000 feet, tacking like a boat to follow air currents. 0 Project Looncenter_img Alphabet says its Loon balloons could beam internet to more people than before Alphabet’s Loon recruits high-powered mobile veterans to serve on board This Loon internet balloon just spent seven months in the air Share your voice Post a comment 1:16 Mobile Sci-Techlast_img read more

AgustaWestland chopper scam ED raids involved firms freezes assets worth Rs 86

first_imgThe Enforcement Directorate on Monday raided several firms and their premises across New Delhi, Mumbai and Hyderabad, freezing over Rs. 86 crore shares held by them in ventures abroad, reported Press Trust of India. The raids were part of the agency’s probe into Rs. 3,600 crore AgustaWestland VVIP chopper deal.Officials reportedly said the agency seized a number of documents during the searches as they were connected to the case. It also ordered freezing of shares worth Rs. 86 crore of firms based in Dubai, Mauritius and Singapore.The report noted that both the ED and the CBI have issued judicial requests to many countries in order to collect more evidences and proofs.AgustaWestland’s parent company Finmeccanica allegedly paid Rs. 360 crore kickback to Indian individuals and enterprises to secure the deal. The deal involved selling 12 helicopters to be used by VVIPs in India and was masked as transactions performing multiple work contracts, reported IANS.Under the prevention of money laundering act (PMLA), the ED registered the case in 2014 and has so far listed 21 people in its FIR. Former Air Force Chief S.P. Tyagi, businessman Gautam Khaitan, Italian middlemen Christian Michel James, Guido Ralph Haschke and Carlo Gerosa have been named in the FIR.The Indian government in January 2014 cancelled the deal alleging breach of contractual obligations and charges of bribery. However, investigation in Italy reached a new crescendo with the chief executive of Finmeccanica held guilty of international corruption and money laundering. The court also highlighted that a few politicians too were involved in the corruption in the chopper deal in 2010.last_img read more

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam suspends controversial extradition bill until further notice

first_imgMass demonstration against the proposed extradition law proposal on June 9, 2019, in Hong KongGetty ImagesThe controversial law that prompted Hong Kong into mass demonstrations of dissent has been officially suspended until further notice.In an official press conference held in Hong Kong on  Saturday, June 15, the severely criticised Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced that the pro-Beijing lawmakers had urged the government to delay the bill.Referring to the massive protest that the bill generated from Hong Kong’s citizens, Lam said that “We should pause and think instead of assuming the second reading of the bill in the Legislative Council as scheduled,” reported Hong Kong Free Press.She further said that the Government of Hong Kong is reflecting on the protests and is adopting an open mind “to heed comprehensively” the views of all sections of the society.However, she insisted that the “loophole” in the Hong Kong criminal justice system, which according to her was the main reason behind pushing forward the contentious bill, continue to persist and clarified the fact that the government has not completely retracted the bill. Lam cited the murder case in Taiwan, in which the alleged perpetrator, a Hong Kong man, fled to the city had prompted the two countries to re-evaluate the criminal justice system affecting both the countries.The Taiwanese authorities have however said that it would not seek the extradition of the accused man as the proposed bill is suspected to put its citizens at risk.Dismissing questions whether she will resign after the widespread dissent over her proposed bill, she said that “We regret that this incident caused a split in society.”Earlier, before she became the Chief Executive in 2017, Lam had said that she would resign “if mainstream opinion makes me no longer able to continue the job,” CNN reported.Last week, at least a million protesters marched against the passing of the contentious extradition law. The massive demonstration turned violent after the riot police armed with batons arrived at the government headquarters in the Admiralty business district and subjected tear gas and pepper sprays against protestors who charged and hurled the police barricades.However, the public is still suspicious and holds its position of Beijing being the mastermind behind the law based on last month’s incident in which a politburo member revealed that its targets included foreigners who had committed crimes against Chinese national security outside China.The anxiety of Hong Kong bending before Beijing’s imposition had plagued the minds of many before the recent demonstrations.In April, pro-democracy protest organisers were jailed for taking part in the Umbrella Movement protests in 2014 in which demonstration for seeking free, transparent elections from China had been sought by the public.last_img read more

Fear isolation for Myanmars remaining Rohingyas

first_imgRohingya-burningBy the twisted standards of Myanmar’s Rakhine state, Abdullah is one of its more fortunate Rohingya residents.The 34-year-old is alive, his village is intact and he is able to make a living-albeit a meagre one-in his homeland as a farmer.Abdullah’s Rohingya Muslim minority are disappearing fast from Myanmar.Some one million of them-around two-thirds of their entire stateless community-have been forced over the border to refugee camps in Bangladesh by successive waves of persecution.The latest has expelled some 700,000 Rohingya since August, when the army launched a campaign of violence that the UN says amounted to “ethnic cleansing”.Abdullah’s village of Shan Taung is near the temple-studded town of Mrauk U, not far from the epicentre of the most recent crackdown in northern Rakhine but partly sheltered from its worst excesses by a range of forested mountains.He is among the 500,000 Rohingya that the UN estimates remain in Myanmar, some confined to camps after previous rounds of violence while others are spared by wealth, luck or-like the villages in Abdullah’s area-simply by isolation from the latest military campaign.Yet their lives are still shaped by tension and fear in a mainly-Buddhist country that has methodically stripped the Muslim minority of legal rights and security.The status of the Rohingya in Rakhine hangs by a thread in the wake of the army crackdown, which has seen Myanmar troops and ethnic Rakhine mobs accused of burning Rohingya villages, and of raping and murdering their residents.Shan Taung, with its 4,500-strong Rohingya population, appears peaceful.Fishermen dry their catch in the sun, farmers bring in the rice paddy and children play at the side of the road.But fear has sharply segregated the Rohingya Muslims and the ethnic Rakhine Buddhists living nearby.The Rohingya say they risk a beating-or worse-if they stray into territory the Rakhine regard as their own, while few trust the police to protect them.It wasn’t always this way, says Abdullah, explaining he once had Rakhine friends and stayed with a Rakhine family while studying at university in the state capital, Sittwe.“They no longer treat me like they used to,” he tells AFP. “They don’t say good things.”Communal relations have disintegrated in recent months around Mrauk U town, where several people died recently after police opened fire on an ethnic Rakhine nationalist protest.“We do not trust each other anymore,” a Rakhine youth told AFP, asking not to be named.“Rakhines are also watching each other to make sure no one from the town is friends with Muslims.”Yearning for citizenship -Around 150,000 Rohingya are thought to still be living in northern Rakhine, spread among disparate villages spared in the violent crackdown.But rights groups say many of those communities are hungry and scared, unable to work freely and hemmed in by hostile neighbours, as the army beefs up its bases around them.Ye Htut, the administrator of Maungdaw, the most populous district in the north, played down strife between the communities that remained.“Muslims still living here don’t say they are afraid,” he told reporters. “Many houses are still left.”Further south, another 130,000 Rohingya fester in internment camps, a grim legacy from rounds of inter-communal violence since 2012.Another 200,000 fare only marginally better, living in their own villages but under restrictions on movement that UN spokesman Pierre Peron says “severely compromise” basic rights and access to health and education.With tensions sky-high, Rohingya are still leaving.On Sunday, a boatload of Rohingya who departed from Sittwe were spotted in Thai waters and “helped on” by the navy towards Malaysia.Rohingya still arrive on foot in Bangladesh seeking sanctuary after fleeing threats and hunger.Others with enough money for bribes can also try to make their way to Myanmar’s commercial capital Yangon, joining tens of thousands of Rohingya who already live discreetly in the country’s major urban centres.Yet even there, existence feels parlous.“People are afraid every step they take,” says Yangon-based Kyaw Soe Aung, Secretary General of the Rohingya-focused Democracy and Human Rights Party.“There is no security and rule of law for Rohingya and Muslims.”Officially the “Rohingya” do not exist in Myanmar and as a result are denied citizenship.Instead they are branded “Bengalis”, reinforcing the narrative that they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.Corruption and intimidation -Rohingya seeking citizenship must agree to be classified as “Bengali” in a notorious verification process which denies them constitutional rights as a separate ethnic minority and leaves them vulnerable to expulsion.Critics say the National Verification Card (NVC) they are pressed to sign up for is less a pathway to citizenship than a means of control.From 2010 until the end of 2017, government statistics show only around 7,600 Rohingya signed up and only a couple of hundred have obtained citizenship.Ko Ko, not his real name, is one of the few Rohingya to hold a valid ID card-sporting the term “Bengali”.The 20-year-old says, however, that means he must regularly grease pockets and wait longer when dealing with anybody in any position of authority because he is automatically put at the bottom of the pile.He and a friend collect data about alleged atrocities in Rakhine and also try to counter anti-Rohingya “fake news” with a website that has some 10,000 hits a week.His father worries about his activist work and wants him to seek asylum overseas but Ko Ko refuses.“We have to get back our citizenship,” he says.“I will work for change. I’m doing the right thing.”last_img read more

No Big Bang Quantum equation predicts universe has no beginning

first_img Theorists apply loop quantum gravity theory to black hole This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Ahmed Farag Ali and Saurya Das. “Cosmology from quantum potential.” Physics Letters B. Volume 741, 4 February 2015, Pages 276–279. DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2014.12.057. Also at: arXiv:1404.3093[gr-qc].Saurya Das and Rajat K. Bhaduri, “Dark matter and dark energy from Bose-Einstein condensate”, preprint: arXiv:1411.0753[gr-qc]. © 2015 Phys.org Citation: No Big Bang? Quantum equation predicts universe has no beginning (2015, February 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-02-big-quantum-equation-universe.html No singularities nor dark stuffIn addition to not predicting a Big Bang singularity, the new model does not predict a “big crunch” singularity, either. In general relativity, one possible fate of the universe is that it starts to shrink until it collapses in on itself in a big crunch and becomes an infinitely dense point once again. Ali and Das explain in their paper that their model avoids singularities because of a key difference between classical geodesics and Bohmian trajectories. Classical geodesics eventually cross each other, and the points at which they converge are singularities. In contrast, Bohmian trajectories never cross each other, so singularities do not appear in the equations.In cosmological terms, the scientists explain that the quantum corrections can be thought of as a cosmological constant term (without the need for dark energy) and a radiation term. These terms keep the universe at a finite size, and therefore give it an infinite age. The terms also make predictions that agree closely with current observations of the cosmological constant and density of the universe.New gravity particleIn physical terms, the model describes the universe as being filled with a quantum fluid. The scientists propose that this fluid might be composed of gravitons—hypothetical massless particles that mediate the force of gravity. If they exist, gravitons are thought to play a key role in a theory of quantum gravity.In a related paper, Das and another collaborator, Rajat Bhaduri of McMaster University, Canada, have lent further credence to this model. They show that gravitons can form a Bose-Einstein condensate (named after Einstein and another Indian physicist, Satyendranath Bose) at temperatures that were present in the universe at all epochs. Motivated by the model’s potential to resolve the Big Bang singularity and account for dark matter and dark energy, the physicists plan to analyze their model more rigorously in the future. Their future work includes redoing their study while taking into account small inhomogeneous and anisotropic perturbations, but they do not expect small perturbations to significantly affect the results.”It is satisfying to note that such straightforward corrections can potentially resolve so many issues at once,” Das said. (Phys.org) —The universe may have existed forever, according to a new model that applies quantum correction terms to complement Einstein’s theory of general relativity. The model may also account for dark matter and dark energy, resolving multiple problems at once. Explore further The widely accepted age of the universe, as estimated by general relativity, is 13.8 billion years. In the beginning, everything in existence is thought to have occupied a single infinitely dense point, or singularity. Only after this point began to expand in a “Big Bang” did the universe officially begin.Although the Big Bang singularity arises directly and unavoidably from the mathematics of general relativity, some scientists see it as problematic because the math can explain only what happened immediately after—not at or before—the singularity. “The Big Bang singularity is the most serious problem of general relativity because the laws of physics appear to break down there,” Ahmed Farag Ali at Benha University and the Zewail City of Science and Technology, both in Egypt, told Phys.org.Ali and coauthor Saurya Das at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada, have shown in a paper published in Physics Letters B that the Big Bang singularity can be resolved by their new model in which the universe has no beginning and no end. Old ideas revisitedThe physicists emphasize that their quantum correction terms are not applied ad hoc in an attempt to specifically eliminate the Big Bang singularity. Their work is based on ideas by the theoretical physicist David Bohm, who is also known for his contributions to the philosophy of physics. Starting in the 1950s, Bohm explored replacing classical geodesics (the shortest path between two points on a curved surface) with quantum trajectories. In their paper, Ali and Das applied these Bohmian trajectories to an equation developed in the 1950s by physicist Amal Kumar Raychaudhuri at Presidency University in Kolkata, India. Raychaudhuri was also Das’s teacher when he was an undergraduate student of that institution in the ’90s. Using the quantum-corrected Raychaudhuri equation, Ali and Das derived quantum-corrected Friedmann equations, which describe the expansion and evolution of universe (including the Big Bang) within the context of general relativity. Although it’s not a true theory of quantum gravity, the model does contain elements from both quantum theory and general relativity. Ali and Das also expect their results to hold even if and when a full theory of quantum gravity is formulated. Journal information: Physics Letters B This is an artist’s concept of the metric expansion of space, where space (including hypothetical non-observable portions of the universe) is represented at each time by the circular sections. Note on the left the dramatic expansion (not to scale) occurring in the inflationary epoch, and at the center the expansion acceleration. The scheme is decorated with WMAP images on the left and with the representation of stars at the appropriate level of development. Credit: NASAlast_img read more

Metalens achieves nearunity numerical aperture

first_imgIllustration of the new optical lens with a near-unity numerical aperture. Credit: Paniagua-Domínguez et al. ©2018 American Chemical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The researchers, led by Arseniy Kuznetsov and Ramón Paniagua-Domínguez, at A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research) and Nanyang Technological University, both in Singapore, have published a paper on the lens with near-unity numerical aperture in a recent issue of Nano Letters.Previously, the highest numerical aperture for a free-space lens was 0.95, which corresponds to a maximum collection angle of around 72°. Due to the way these lenses are made, they are also large and expensive, and so cannot be easily scaled down to work with very small systems.With its numerical aperture of 0.99, the new lens has both a higher resolution and a larger collection angle of 82°. The new lens is made of a metasurface rather than traditional lens materials. The metasurface consists of a pattern of subwavelength-scale structures and has an overall thickness of less than one wavelength of light, resulting in a small size that greatly expands its potential applications.”High-numerical aperture lenses/microscope objectives are major optical components that are widely used in microscopy, optical detection systems, optical lithography, quantum optics, etc.,” Kuznetsov told Phys.org. “Having a high numerical aperture is of primary importance in achieving a high resolution and high detection level of optical signals. Currently existing high-numerical-aperture lenses/microscope objectives are bulky and expensive. In this work, we showed that, using a new concept of metasurfaces based on dielectric nanoantennas, it is possible to design and realize flat optical components that can achieve a numerical aperture higher than all existing optical objectives, using just a device just a few hundred nanometers thick.”To demonstrate the advantages of the new lens, the researchers used it to image nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond nanocrystals, which are several tens of nanometers in size. The images scanned by the new metalens revealed smaller spots compared to images scanned using commercial lenses with smaller numerical apertures, demonstrating the new lens’ higher resolution.The researchers expect that, in the future, the new lens may also be used to make improvements to photolithography, which is used to produce computer chips and other high-resolution devices. In addition, the new lens’ wide-angle collection is expected to increase the efficiency of single-photon emission processes, which are used in quantum optics systems.”We believe that this new concept will find broad applications in areas where detection of weak optical signals is important,” Kuznetsov said. “One example is in quantum optics, which deals with systems containing only single atoms or quantum emitters emitting light at the single-photon level. Such flat lenses not only allow for the detection of weak optical signals, but also can operate at extreme conditions of low temperatures and in vacuum, which is typical for quantum optics experiments.”Another important application direction could be in wearable and mobile photonic devices, where dense integration of high-efficiency optical components is required. For example, the lenses could find applications in mobile phone cameras and augmented reality glasses.” Nanostructured thin-films that can bend light by large angles could be a replacement for bulky glass optical components Explore further More information: Ramón Paniagua-Domínguez et al. “A Metalens with a Near-Unity Numerical Aperture.” Nano Letters 18, 2124–2132 (2018). DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.8b00368center_img Researchers have designed an optical lens with the highest free-space numerical aperture to date, achieving a value of just under 1. As the numerical aperture indicates the highest possible resolution that a lens can attain, the new lens can focus light with unprecedented ability, as well as collect light from wide angles. These abilities should make the lens particularly useful for low-light applications, such as single-photon emission, which is often used in quantum optics systems. Journal information: Nano Letters Citation: Metalens achieves near-unity numerical aperture (2018, March 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-metalens-near-unity-numerical-aperture.html © 2018 Phys.orglast_img read more