OBITUARY Lucille C Enos Gilson 77

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Lucille C. (Enos) Gilson, age 77, of Chelmsford, formerly of Wilmington, passed away on August 30, 2019.Lucille was born on April 25, 1942 in Boston, MA; she was the cherished daughter of the late John and Mary (Broderick) Enos. Lucille was raised in Charlestown and graduated from St. Mary’s high school.Lucille married her husband, Albert G. Gilson in 1965; they lived in Somerville for a short time before settling in Wilmington in 1967. Lucille was a loving mother to three boys; Phil, Steve, and Tom. She loved to spend time with her family and was especially delighted when she became “Nana” to Ashlyn Gianna, Nicholas and Isabelle. Lucille and Albert shared many wonderful memories before his passing in 2016.Lucille worked as a clerk at CVS in Wilmington for many years; she loved her job and enjoyed her customers.In her spare time, Lucille loved to spend time in her garden. She also enjoyed cooking, baking and sewing. Lucille had a love for all animals and enjoyed babysitting for her family’s animals when they were away.Lucille was a loving and gentle mother and grandmother. She was devoted to her family and will be missed dearly.Lucille was the beloved wife of the late Albert G. Gilson, devoted mother of Phillip Gilson & his wife Heidi of Tyngsborough, Stephen Gilson & his wife Chanhsamone of Hudson, NH, and Thomas Gilson of Lowell, loving “Nana” of Ashlyn, Gianna, Nicholas and Isabelle, cherished daughter of the late John and Mary (Broderick) Enos, dear sister of Carolyn Deal of Stoneham, the late John Enos and Cynthia Gallarelli, sister-in-law of Al Gallarelli of Wilmington. Lucille is also survived by many brothers and sisters-in-law, nieces and nephews.Family and friends will gather at the Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 62), Wilmington, on Friday, September 6th at 9:00 a.m. followed by a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Thomas of Villanova Church, 126 Middlesex Ave., Wilmington at 10:00 a.m. Interment will follow in Wildwood Cemetery, Wilmington. Visiting Hours will be held at the Funeral Home on Thursday, September 5th from 4:00-7:00 p.m.Memorial donations in Lucille’s name may be made to Beacon Hospice, 290 Merrimack St., Lawrence, MA 01843.Lucille C. (Enos) Gilson(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Albert G. Gilson, 76In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Lucille M. (Sabella) Ausiello, 76In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Bertha G. (Gouveia) Deprez, 81In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Fear isolation for Myanmars remaining Rohingyas

first_imgRohingya-burningBy the twisted standards of Myanmar’s Rakhine state, Abdullah is one of its more fortunate Rohingya residents.The 34-year-old is alive, his village is intact and he is able to make a living-albeit a meagre one-in his homeland as a farmer.Abdullah’s Rohingya Muslim minority are disappearing fast from Myanmar.Some one million of them-around two-thirds of their entire stateless community-have been forced over the border to refugee camps in Bangladesh by successive waves of persecution.The latest has expelled some 700,000 Rohingya since August, when the army launched a campaign of violence that the UN says amounted to “ethnic cleansing”.Abdullah’s village of Shan Taung is near the temple-studded town of Mrauk U, not far from the epicentre of the most recent crackdown in northern Rakhine but partly sheltered from its worst excesses by a range of forested mountains.He is among the 500,000 Rohingya that the UN estimates remain in Myanmar, some confined to camps after previous rounds of violence while others are spared by wealth, luck or-like the villages in Abdullah’s area-simply by isolation from the latest military campaign.Yet their lives are still shaped by tension and fear in a mainly-Buddhist country that has methodically stripped the Muslim minority of legal rights and security.The status of the Rohingya in Rakhine hangs by a thread in the wake of the army crackdown, which has seen Myanmar troops and ethnic Rakhine mobs accused of burning Rohingya villages, and of raping and murdering their residents.Shan Taung, with its 4,500-strong Rohingya population, appears peaceful.Fishermen dry their catch in the sun, farmers bring in the rice paddy and children play at the side of the road.But fear has sharply segregated the Rohingya Muslims and the ethnic Rakhine Buddhists living nearby.The Rohingya say they risk a beating-or worse-if they stray into territory the Rakhine regard as their own, while few trust the police to protect them.It wasn’t always this way, says Abdullah, explaining he once had Rakhine friends and stayed with a Rakhine family while studying at university in the state capital, Sittwe.“They no longer treat me like they used to,” he tells AFP. “They don’t say good things.”Communal relations have disintegrated in recent months around Mrauk U town, where several people died recently after police opened fire on an ethnic Rakhine nationalist protest.“We do not trust each other anymore,” a Rakhine youth told AFP, asking not to be named.“Rakhines are also watching each other to make sure no one from the town is friends with Muslims.”Yearning for citizenship -Around 150,000 Rohingya are thought to still be living in northern Rakhine, spread among disparate villages spared in the violent crackdown.But rights groups say many of those communities are hungry and scared, unable to work freely and hemmed in by hostile neighbours, as the army beefs up its bases around them.Ye Htut, the administrator of Maungdaw, the most populous district in the north, played down strife between the communities that remained.“Muslims still living here don’t say they are afraid,” he told reporters. “Many houses are still left.”Further south, another 130,000 Rohingya fester in internment camps, a grim legacy from rounds of inter-communal violence since 2012.Another 200,000 fare only marginally better, living in their own villages but under restrictions on movement that UN spokesman Pierre Peron says “severely compromise” basic rights and access to health and education.With tensions sky-high, Rohingya are still leaving.On Sunday, a boatload of Rohingya who departed from Sittwe were spotted in Thai waters and “helped on” by the navy towards Malaysia.Rohingya still arrive on foot in Bangladesh seeking sanctuary after fleeing threats and hunger.Others with enough money for bribes can also try to make their way to Myanmar’s commercial capital Yangon, joining tens of thousands of Rohingya who already live discreetly in the country’s major urban centres.Yet even there, existence feels parlous.“People are afraid every step they take,” says Yangon-based Kyaw Soe Aung, Secretary General of the Rohingya-focused Democracy and Human Rights Party.“There is no security and rule of law for Rohingya and Muslims.”Officially the “Rohingya” do not exist in Myanmar and as a result are denied citizenship.Instead they are branded “Bengalis”, reinforcing the narrative that they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.Corruption and intimidation -Rohingya seeking citizenship must agree to be classified as “Bengali” in a notorious verification process which denies them constitutional rights as a separate ethnic minority and leaves them vulnerable to expulsion.Critics say the National Verification Card (NVC) they are pressed to sign up for is less a pathway to citizenship than a means of control.From 2010 until the end of 2017, government statistics show only around 7,600 Rohingya signed up and only a couple of hundred have obtained citizenship.Ko Ko, not his real name, is one of the few Rohingya to hold a valid ID card-sporting the term “Bengali”.The 20-year-old says, however, that means he must regularly grease pockets and wait longer when dealing with anybody in any position of authority because he is automatically put at the bottom of the pile.He and a friend collect data about alleged atrocities in Rakhine and also try to counter anti-Rohingya “fake news” with a website that has some 10,000 hits a week.His father worries about his activist work and wants him to seek asylum overseas but Ko Ko refuses.“We have to get back our citizenship,” he says.“I will work for change. I’m doing the right thing.”last_img read more

Because we love you Mom

first_imgMother’s Day is the perfect occasion to show your mom how much you appreciate and value her. It is one such day when we get to say a ‘Big Thank You’ to our moms for all that they have done for us. It is a day when we want them to feel absolutely pampered and blessed. So this Mother’s Day, share priceless moments with your mum as The Imperial shower her with a delightful bouquet of offerings with special discounts and packages, celebrating 100 years of Mother’s Day across the  restaurants. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Let her indulge in a fabulous brunch buffet at 1911 while you feel satiated that you are at the right place to make her spoilt for choice. High fashion cup cakes with personalized messages, home grown soil free 100 % organic micro greens combined with a health station filled with a fine selection of healthy juices extracted live, leave you asking for more and promise to excite you to take your pick on a blazing hot day. The lavish buffet has much more to offer. Uniquely designed chocolate nests with dainty eggs notify the genesis of life and pay an ode to motherhood while accentuating emotions and leaving the mouth-watering flavors in your mouth. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe buffet would be thematically designed by our team of chefs with lots of candles for a feminine touch to celebrate the occasion and make all the mothers present, feel special. Chef’s special Amuse Busch offerings would be served complimentary to all guests at the buffet. So this is your time to give back to your mothers and make this day truly special and memorable for them. Enjoy this unique brunch with your mothers while we create lasting memories for you, one of it is the unusual souvenir from The Imperial – a specially designed Chocolate jewelry. The priceless memories get more enchanting with 20% discount on cakes and pastries at La Baguette, on High-Tea at the Atrium, on Diamond Magnetic Body Ritual – 90 mins (Spa Gift Voucher valid in SUFI room at The Imperial Salon for 1 month and not to be used in conjunctions with any other promotion), on Caviar Signature Hair Ritual – 90 mins, 20% discount off on Sufi products at The Imperial Spa and Salon and The Imperial Boutique.Where: The Imperial When: 11 May Timing: 12.30 – 3.30 pm Price: Rs 3200 + taxeslast_img read more

For Amazon Cloud Wars Heat Up

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. To avoid the hassle of operating data centers, many companies hand the job off to Amazon. In addition to being the biggest online retailer, Amazon has built a giant business of renting servers to customers that need computing power to crunch numbers, stream movies and process orders.But Amazon, the leading so-called “cloud services platform,” faces an increasingly stiff challenge. Rivals like Microsoft are slowly gaining ground in what is a key battleground between some of the technology industry’s biggest companies.“Cloud platforms are the service of choice for modern software, which means that all the big businesses who have a significant stake in app development or distribution are getting into this space. They have to,” says James Staten, a Forrester Research analyst.Amazon’s Web Services, the name of its data center arm, controlled up to 75% of the global cloud platforms market in 2013, according to Forrester Research analyst James Staten. But that share is expected to drop to around 65% by the end of this year.Meanwhile, Microsoft, a distant second in the race with what is known as Azure, had 15% of the market in 2013. That share is expected to climb to 25% by the end of the year.The potential for cloud computing remains huge. Corporations could spend as much as $235 billion on it in 2017, more than triple the amount they spent in 2011, according to IHS Technology. It’s no wonder then companies like Microsoft, Google, Salesforce, SAP and Oracle are ramping up efforts to meet demand.Created in 2006, Amazon Web Services gambled early on the idea of building data centers that stored and processed information for other businesses. Now that data center division, which is estimated to generate around $5.5 billion in revenues this year, has over 1 million customers like NASA, Netflix and Spotify.“The cloud is the new normal,” boasted Andy Jassy, Amazon Web Services SVP, at the cloud platform’s annual conference in Las Vegas last week where the company unveiled tools to make software development easier and cheaper.Microsoft pushed into the so-called “cloud” long before Satya Nadella became CEO in February. But it was Nadella who championed a more cloud-focused strategy inside the company.Signing up data customers is critical for Microsoft, which has had huge success in selling software for personal computers but has stumbled as people have shifted to mobile devices. The company is betting that business services like Azure are a big part of its future.Microsoft is trying to close the gap through lower prices and by rapidly introducing new features. Jeffrey Hammond, a Forrester Research analyst, said that Azure is easier to learn for new customers that lack technical experience.“I think that’s often how developers feel,” Hammond says. “There are a lot of different choices, and it’s not always clear what the best thing to do is.”Still, Amazon Web Services remains the platform of choice for startups such as Spotify, Airbnb and Pinterest. Azure, meanwhile, is more popular with larger companies such as Xerox, eBay and McKesson. (According to Staten, more startups are starting to use Azure, but in many of those cases, the startup has some prior history with Microsoft.) Both platforms must round out their services more to fuel growth.Microsoft is marketing its cloud as being more flexible than Amazon’s. Traditionally, Amazon’s servers hosted and processed the vast majority of their customers’ information. Microsoft, in contrast, uses a more “hybrid” approach in which customers can store and process some of their data with Microsoft while doing the rest on their own servers. That’s appealing to customers that want more ownership over their information but still want some of the cloud’s benefits.Microsoft’s “hybrid” approach could prove more lucrative, at least in the near-future. By 2017, Gartner estimates that nearly 50% of all large enterprises in the U.S. will run off some kind of hybrid cloud set-up. Even Amazon gets the appeal. Earlier this year, Amazon CTO Werner Vogels said his company would offer some tools to help customers go hybrid if that is what they want.“What we’re ultimately seeing here is huge change,” says Hammond, comparing the move to cloud services to the rise of the Web.For Amazon Web Services, Azure and others battling for the cloud platform market, the trend signals something they already know: Game on. This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine 4 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » November 19, 2014last_img read more