West Ham’s Alisha Lehmann keen to add Wembley knees-up to East End adventure

first_imgShare via Email Share on Facebook features Read more Reuse this content We are just shy of 10 months on from when the Swiss forward Alisha Lehmann joined West Ham. With no English, and at the age of 19, it was a step into the unknown for her. Now, though, the winger has a PFA young player of the year nomination under her belt and is preparing for West Ham’s first FA Cup final, against Manchester City on Saturday.“It really is a culture shock because Switzerland is so small and it’s huge here,” says Lehmann, sitting in the sun outside the clubhouse at West Ham’s Rush Green training ground, where the women’s team play their home games. “It’s different, but in a good way different.” West Ham United Women Share on Twitter Topics Eni Aluko Read more The change was initially hard but the decision to move was not. “At first when I got to the first team, with the national team, it was an easy decision because all the players play in other countries because the Swiss league isn’t that good,” she says. “In Switzerland you can’t take the steps you want to.”She was prepared for the difficulties her lack of English would pose but not for east London. “First when I came I couldn’t speak, you know? It was so hard because the dialogue here is … oh my God, I couldn’t understand anything.”Now her English is way beyond what you would expect after 10 months. “When you speak English all day you can’t really not [learn it],” she says modestly.Lehmann was plucked from the relative unknown by the then new West Ham manager, Matt Beard, who has a knack for that. She was playing for Swiss team Young Boys and had shone for the national team at the European Women’s Under‑19 Championship and featured for Switzerland’s senior side since 2016.After a brief settling-in period – “I needed a few games to get used to this intensity; it’s more physical” – she got her first goal in West Ham’s ninth game of the season, scoring the winner as they came from behind to beat Everton 2-1.But what was her image of West Ham as a club before she arrived? “I only knew the men’s. Because the women [had] played in the third tier, I didn’t know them.”Of the men’s she “only knew they play in the Premier League and then a few players. Chicharito [Javier Hernández] I knew, because he played in Germany. [Marko] Arnautovic because of Austria. A few but not much.”She has nine goals in her maiden season, mainly playing on the wing, and was nominated for the PFA young player of the year alongside the winner, Georgia Stanway, and the main award winner, Vivianne Miedema.The English league was not completely alien to Lehmann, whose partner is the Chelsea striker Ramona Bachmann, a fellow Switzerland international. In the BBC fly-on-the-wall documentary Britain’s Youngest Football Boss we get an insight into the competitiveness between the two as West Ham prepare to face Chelsea for the first time. Bachmann went on to score the only two goals of the game. In the return the former Chelsea player Gilly Flaherty earned West Ham a draw at Kingsmeadow which confirmed that Chelsea would miss out on Champions League qualification via a top-two finish.center_img Women’s FA Cup Share on WhatsApp Women’s Super League Share on Messenger The pair could have met at Wembley, too, only for an injury-time Magdalena Eriksson own goal in the semi-finals to put City through at the expense of Chelsea, who arguably had the better chances. Lehmann scored the equaliser in West Ham’s semi-final at Reading, which ended 1-1 before they won 4-3 on penalties. Was Lehmann happy to avoid another on-pitch battle with her other half? “If they had won I would have been happy for her. But I don’t mind; in the end we need to win, we don’t mind who we play against.”Now, she can get advice about the Wembley final: “We spoke about them playing there last year. She scored two goals, she told me a little bit about how it will be and I think that’s good for me because I can take the positive things.”Should West Ham beat the odds and come away with a trophy, it would be a testament to Beard’s experience, the support from the club and a remarkable knitting together of 18 players, plus the two added in January, in less than a year.“We came from all over the place and I think that’s why we are so close,” Lehmann says. “We are a little bit like a little family. When I go home and come back I feel really good here. We have really good people and personalities here and it works.” Share on LinkedIn West Ham Women must handle FA Cup final occasion to shock Manchester City Share on Pinterest Women’s football Steph Houghton hails Women’s FA Cup final crowd: ‘We dreamed about this’last_img read more

National Touch League To Return To Coffs Harbour

first_imgCoffs Harbour has won the right after an extremely competitive tender process which included multiple tenders from across New South Wales. The event returns to Coffs Harbour, with the city previously having hosted the NTL event from 1997 through to 2008. Further information can be obtained from the Media Release. While you are in Coffs Harbour for the 2013 X-Blades National Touch League, there are plenty of things to see and do away from the fields. To find out more about Coffs Harbour’s attractions, please visit the following websites:www.destinationnsw.com.au www.coffscoast.com.au Related Files2013_and_2014_ntl_announcement-pdflast_img read more

9 months agoMarseille urged to move for Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayi

first_imgTagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Marseille urged to move for Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayiby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFrench pundit Pierre Menes has urged Olympique Marseille to re-sign Chelsea striker Michy Batshuayi.The Belgian has just had his loan at Valencia cut short and will not be returning to the Blues.Instead, Valencia are helping Batshuayi to find a new club.Menes, meanwhile, says OM should move for him:Houhou l’OM c’est pas une bonne idée ça? RT @lequipe Valence : Michy Batshuayi officiellement indésirable https://t.co/htcZe4MFrI— Pierre Ménès (@PierreMenes) January 10, 2019 last_img read more

9 days agoSpain coach Moreno dedicates Euros qualification to Luis Enrique

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Spain coach Moreno dedicates Euros qualification to Luis Enriqueby Carlos Volcano9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveSpain coach Robert Moreno has dedicated Euros qualification to Luis Enrique.La Roja have made the 2020 Euros after their 1-1 draw with Sweden.And Moreno says qualification is tribute to former Barcelona coach Enrique, who stepped down earlier this year to be with his daughter before her passing.Moreno said, “We have played a good game, and even if we had lost, I would have been happy. Because we have played more with our style. We are qualified and now we have to try to be the top of the group.”Spain is a high-level national team and qualification is a must, but achieving it has its value I want to take the opportunity to dedicate this to Rubiales and Molina because they trusted me, and also Luis Enrique. “It releases tension and doubt, and gives us time to work more comfortably, but without losing tension because the goal is to be one of the six best to go to the draw as seeded teams. It will not be easy, but we will try.” last_img read more

MSMEs Urged to Take Advantage of Positive Economic Climate

first_imgStory Highlights President and Chief Executive Officer of First Global Bank, Mariame McIntosh Robinson, is encouraging small business operators to take advantage of the positive signs in the economy to invest in the expansion of their operations.These indicators include a stable currency, low inflation, lower energy costs, strong net international reserves, heightened business and consumer confidence, and multilateral agency support, together with strong fiscal prudence and management by the Government.The senior banker said the economy is “on a secure, sustainable growth path”, and “there is no better time than now” for micro, small and medium-size enterprise (MSME) operators to invest.“We need entrepreneurs to step up, take the risk to create wealth for your family, and our great nation,” she added.Mrs. McIntosh Robinson was addressing a technology conference held on September 28 at the University of the Commonwealth Caribbean (UCC) in St. Andrew.She noted that MSMEs can access low-cost loans for a wide range of services.She cited equity financing as one option that more operators need to utilise. This involves raising capital through the sale of shares in an enterprise.Mrs. McIntosh Robinson noted further that Jamaica has developed a venture capital financing system, which is like “no other in the Caribbean”.Venture capital is private equity capital provided as seed funding to early-stage, high-potential, growth companies (start-up companies) or as growth funding.International Monetary Fund (IMF) Resident Representative for Jamaica, Dr. Constant Lonkeng Ngouana, in his contribution agreed that now is the time for entrepreneurs to invest.He said that given the type of environment that Jamaica is seeing, “young entrepreneurs should be capturing the benefits”.Dr. Lonkeng Ngouana, in the meanwhile, said he is encouraged by the “ownership” of the Precautionary Standby Arrangement (PSBA), where all the “stakeholders have acknowledged that fiscal discipline is to be maintained”.Under the three-year PSBA, which replaces the Extended Fund Facility, Jamaica can access approximately US$1.7 billion, if needed, for current account support in the event of unforeseen economic shocks.The UCC conference was held under the theme ‘Innovation, Technology and Leadership: A Paradigm Shift’. President and Chief Executive Officer of First Global Bank, Mariame McIntosh Robinson, is encouraging small business operators to take advantage of the positive signs in the economy to invest in the expansion of their operations.center_img The senior banker said the economy is “on a secure, sustainable growth path”, and “there is no better time than now” for micro, small and medium-size enterprise (MSME) operators to invest.last_img read more

Air Transat Thomas Cook sign sevenyear seasonal aircraftsharing deal

first_imgTourism firm Transat A.T. Inc (TSX:TRZ) and Thomas Cook Group Airlines say they have signed a deal to share aircraft on a seasonal basis.The companies say the seven-year partnership will allow both to utilize their fleet of planes more efficiently as their flight destinations shift with the seasons.Air Transat uses smaller aircraft in the winter to fly to the Caribbean, Mexico and Florida and larger aircraft in the summer for transatlantic flights.Meanwhile, Thomas Cook uses smaller aircraft in the summer for Mediterranean travel and larger aircraft in the winter for destinations such as Cuba.Under the agreement announced Monday, every winter Thomas Cook will make available some narrow-body Airbus planes for Air Transat and receive at least one wide-body Airbus plane in return.last_img read more

Air Canada supports aerospace mergers if benefits of competition remain alive

first_imgMONTREAL – Consolidation within the global aircraft manufacturing industry is fine as long as the benefits of competition remain alive, Air Canada’s CEO said Monday.“Having a dynamic where some of the smaller aircraft are supported by some of the larger aircraft manufacturers can actually be a good thing provided that there is still good competition and you’re not faced with a single source environment,” Calin Rovinescu said during an aerospace conference in Montreal.Bombardier is in the process of finalizing Airbus’s purchase a majority control of the C Series program, while Boeing is in talks to join forces with Brazil’s Embraer.Rovinescu said duopolies can get too cozy and act as a negative force against innovation, but the move can also help companies to scale up to ensure programs get to market.He said Airbus supporting the C Series and Embraer working with Boeing isn’t necessarily negative as long as a couple of competitors remain in the marketplace that allow smaller aircraft makers to continue innovating.“We like the fact that the C Series served as somewhat of a disruptor in the narrowbody segment of the market where you really do not see a tremendous amount of innovation for nearly three decades,” he said in a discussion with Bombardier CEO Alain Bellemare.Bellemare said he doesn’t view the Boeing-Embraer tie-up as a “great marriage” but said Bombardier’s deal with Airbus will provide great value to the C Series program.He said the European manufacturer has an amazing customer reach and scale that will help to accelerate C Series sales, and a vast supply chain that can help the aircraft to achieve cost targets more quickly to meet customer demands for lower pricing.“It’s a big driving force behind our ability to take the cost down and get to cost target,” Bellemare added.The comments were made as Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains announced a $49.5-million investment in an aerospace consortium led by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Inc.The funding is expected to create or maintain 300 jobs by helping Bell and 18 industry and academic partners develop innovative technologies, including fully autonomous aerial systems along with efforts to reduce noise.Bell Canada president Cynthia Garneau said the funding could help efforts to develop air taxis designed to reduce road congestion.“The future is not so far away and the future looks very uplifting,” she told the conference.Challenges to developing air taxis including battery technology, air traffic control, cost, certification and public acceptanceUber plans to test its network of electric “flying cars” that can take off and land vertically by 2020 in Dallas and Los Angeles.Meanwhile, the union representing Bombardier employees doesn’t anticipate overly acrimonious negotiations to renew the collective agreement once Airbus takes control of the C Series program.The contract expires Nov. 30 but the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAMAW) travelled to France to meet with the three main aerospace unions to learn more about their relationship with Airbus.David Chartrand, the union’s Quebec co-ordinator, says he was somewhat reassured because there is already a fairly strong union culture in both France and Canada.He says he was “happy” to negotiate with the French company rather than Boeing, the American aerospace giant that could have been Bombardier’s partner in the C Series.In March, Bombardier Aerospace workers voted overwhelmingly in favour of a new reciprocity agreement that ensures workers who switch between Bombardier and the future partnership don’t lose their pensions and keep most seniority benefits, including salary and vacation time.— With files from Julien ArsenaultFollow @RossMarowits on Twitter.Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B, TSX:AC)last_img read more

Voter information cards are in the mail

first_imgElectors should contact the Elections Canada office in their electoral district if:the name on their card contains an errorthey receive a voter information card for a deceased person or someone who does not live at their addressIf there are unforeseen circumstances, like a fire or a flood, the location of a poll changes after the voter information cards are mailed, the electors assigned to that poll will receive another voter information card with the words “Replacement Card” printed on the bottom right corner shared Elections Canada.To vote, electors must show proof of identity and address. The voter information card may be used as a proof of address at the polls. Electors must use it with another piece of accepted ID to prove their identity. To view the list of accepted ID; CLICK HERE.Electors do not need to bring their voter information card to the polls in order to vote, but we encourage them to bring it with them for faster service at the polls.Elections Canada is an independent non-partisan agency that reports directly to Parliament.For election updates, subscribe to the news service at elections.ca GATINEAU, QC – Elections Canada has shared that voter information cards have been mailed out and registered electors should receive their card by October 4.According to Elections Canada, personalized voter information card has been mailed out to each registered elector. The card tells electors when and where to vote and has information about the accessibility of their polling station.Electors who do not receive a card by Friday, October 4, or whose card shows the wrong information, can register or update their address online or by contacting their Elections Canada office.last_img read more

CM BJP manifesto fresh set of jumlas

first_imgNEW DELHI: AAP chief Arvind Kejriwal on Monday termed BJP’s manifesto as a “fresh set of jumlas” and said Prime Minister Narendra Modi and party chief Amit Shah did not have the courage to say why demonetisation was done and farmers were pushed towards destruction.Reminding the PM of his party’s 2014 promise of granting full statehood to Delhi, CM Kejriwal said the present manifesto does not have any mention of it which meant that Modi is lying and in turn making it even more difficult for people to believe in him. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder”BJP unveils a fresh set of jumlas without telling the country what is the fate of its 2014 jumlas. Modi-Shah don’t have the courage to speak on why demonetisation was done ? What happened to two crore jobs? Why were farmers pushed towards destruction?” he said in a tweet. Eyeing to retain power, the BJP on Monday made a plethora of poll promises, including expeditious construction of Ram temple, firmly dealing with terrorism, doubling farmers’ income in the next three years, making India the third-largest economy globally by 2030, and scrapping Article 370 of the Constitution that gave a special status to J&K.last_img read more

Roundtable All Of Baseball History Should Get An Asterisk

It always comes back to the use of performance-enhancing drugs. The “steroid era” may be over, but Major League Baseball is still dealing with its consequences. At the National Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony over the weekend, Craig Biggio was the only batter among the four new inductees. Although some of the greatest hitting records in the history of the sport occurred in the past 20 years, many position players can’t catch a break with Hall voters.So we ran a SurveyMonkey Audience poll asking Americans how they feel about steroids, amphetamines and the pre-integration era and then gathered FiveThirtyEight’s baseball fans to talk about the results (the following transcript has been lightly edited for length and clarity):Walt Hickey: It’s pretty clear the vast majority of people — even baseball fans — are not comfortable with just letting the records stand. Of everyone surveyed, 88 percent thought the records should be struck down entirely or have an indicator that there was some funny business going on.Neil Paine: I’m not surprised the majority of those polled want something — anything — to be done about the numbers compiled during the steroid era. Baseball is the most statistical of all the major sports, and it has always loved to foster the notion that you could compare, say, Honus Wagner’s stats to those of Alex Rodriguez side by side, without any adjustment, and still make a meaningful comparison. Sabermetricians have long acknowledged this as naive; between park effects and era adjustments, there are plenty of ways baseball stats need to be tweaked to level the playing field between different generations of players. But even for the lay fan, the age of PEDs [performance-enhancing drugs] destroyed any pretense that unadjusted numbers could be freely compared between eras, and I think that fact alone upset traditionalists as much as anything else.Harry Enten: I must admit that steroids to me is a highly emotional issue. Many of the players we associate with steroids are people we also associate with being jerks — people like Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and A-Rod. But the real question is: Where does it end? Is it that stats are changed? Are champions changed? There can be no doubt that many, if not all, of the champions for a period in the 1990s and 2000s had steroid users. We’re not going to go back and change winners. In a lot of this polling, people are making an emotional argument.Walt: I, on the other hand, could not care less about steroid use. I feel like this notion of the game as some platonic ideal that existed prior to the big bad performance enhancers showed up is patently false. Every era had its own competitive advantages, as we’ll talk about in a second, but it’s only the steroid issue — and not, you know, the players who had the competitive advantages of rampant stimulant use and not having to compete with black players — that seems to make people think The Game is not somehow Pure.Rob Arthur: I’m under no illusions the game of baseball is Pure (nor will it ever be), but I also don’t know if it was ever dirtier than it was during the steroid era. Cheating is and has always been rampant, both on and off the field, but with steroids, we have a means of cheating that seems particularly effective. You can see that both in the scientific literature, where steroids seem to improve strength by as much as 20 percent, but also on the baseball field, where we had some notable steroid users like Bonds smashing records left and right.Harry: But what about during the “deadball era” — specifically between 1912 (I think) and 1920, when you had the spitball among other things? Offensive numbers took a dive. There is clear physical evidence that a spitball (or scuffing the ball) is a big deal. Now using that wasn’t illegal when it first started, but neither were steroids. They are now, yet people look at them so much differently than the pitching statistics that were occurring in the 1910s.Rob: Harry, you definitely have a point. But I think one of the reasons steroids are so objectionable is because of the asymmetry they created between players: Some players who used them seemed to become almost inhumanly effective, others didn’t use them at all and gained no benefit, and still others used but didn’t improve substantially. When the spitball was legal, it was available to all pitchers, and I doubt that any pitcher’s spit was 50 percent more effective at decreasing offense than any other pitcher’s spit. (I am aware that once the spitball was banned, some players were grandfathered in and still allowed to use it. Obviously, that wouldn’t fly in the modern era.)Neil: And don’t even get me started debating whether Lasik surgery counts as “unnatural” and “performance-enhancing.”Walt: Yeah, Tommy John called — he wants his pitching speed back. We will get back to the 1920s era of baseball soon enough, Enten. For now: My favorite part of this was comparing how different fan bases cared about steroids based on how much their teams gained from steroid use.Editor’s Note: On Friday, we introduced the idea of a steroid “discount” — a penalty in percentage terms that would be deducted from players’ individual statistics if they were found to be using PEDs. Our poll asked respondents to recommend said discount, which we can also break down by team fandom.The following table is color-coded by how much (red) or how little (white) each team’s fans would penalize steroid-using players.1Specifically, players who were suspended for PED offenses, were linked to the Biogenesis scandal, were named in the Mitchell Report or whose failed drug tests were leaked to the media. Because some teams had far more fans respond than others — and some teams’ fans hardly voted at all — the columns have been color-coded to represent a combination of average response and the number of respondents. In other words, results have been regressed to the mean based on sample size. Likewise, the correlations at the bottom of the table were weighted by the number of respondents from each fan base.Walt: Hot damn, Giants.Neil: It’s interesting that, as fandom intensifies, a relationship does begin to materialize between how much the voter’s favorite team relied on steroid users and how much tolerance he or she has for steroid users’ stats.If we look at all of our survey’s respondents — including those who were and were not self-professed baseball fans — there’s essentially no relationship between team steroid reliance and how much steroid-tainted stats the voter would recommend taking away. But when you throw out non-fans, a small2Correlation: -0.2 relationship emerges. Fan bases whose stars used steroids to generate more wins, whether on a per-season basis or as a percentage of the team’s total, tended to want steroid users to be punished less.Then again, it’s a slight relationship at best. While San Francisco Giants fans — hello Barry Bonds! — wanted juicers dinged much less than the average fan base, fans of the Oakland Athletics and Chicago Cubs (who rank fourth and fifth in the degree to which they were helped by steroid-using batters) asked for some of the highest penalties of any group of rooters.But that’s not the only way to measure the cognitive dissonance between a fan’s acceptance of steroids and the degree to which his or her team benefited from them.Walt: I whipped this up really quickly: It’s the scatterplot of teams, with that “how much did they gain from PEDs” metric plotted against the percentage of their fan base that said they thought the records of steroid users should be struck. What an interesting relationship:Walt: It’s a small sample size, but I really love that fans of teams that didn’t gain a lot from PEDs seem more likely to desire retribution against players who did.Rob: The relationship between steroid contribution and desire for retribution is really fascinating and upholds a long-held suspicion of mine. It also suggests (again) that these attitudes are largely driven by emotions: If my team benefited, then steroids were OK, but if not, steroids were terrible! It shows that fans, in particular, have a hard time divorcing their own fandom from the questions about how much steroids benefited particular players and how much we should care as a result.Walt: So then the question becomes where do we draw the line when it comes to performance-enhancing things in each era? I personally think it’s bullshit that people get so riled up about steroids and not, for instance, the widespread amphetamine use in MLB in the era prior to it.It turns out America agrees!Walt: So, Neil, who would this affect?Neil: Like you said, it’s pretty widely acknowledged that amphetamine use was prevalent in MLB throughout much of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. During a 1985 drug trial, former Mets and Pirates first baseman John Milner testified that he had received “greenies” (amphetamines) from Hall of Famers Willie Mays and Willie Stargell at various times during his career, and Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt said the substance was “widely available in major-league clubhouses” when he played.So it’s at least possible — if not probable — that some of that era’s greatest superstars used a now-banned substance to sharpen their focus and boost their energy levels. (Even if the evidence is mixed over whether greenies actually even help athletic performance.)Walt: I feel like higher focus and higher energy is probably a nice thing for batters to have. I imagine their record collections were remarkably well-organized as well.I’m pretty happy to see some consistency here. I compared how people answered the steroid question with how they answered the stimulant question, and 88 percent of respondents (and 86 percent of fans) stuck to their guns and replied with the same answer they gave for steroid policy. It seems like at least among the general population there’s a lot more consistency with how to handle the policy than there is in the league.Still, it’s surprising that at the end of the day, 44 percent of Americans would strip away statistical accomplishments from amphetamine users in the era of Willie Mays, Hank Aaron and Mickey Mantle.Neil: Agreed. The general attitude among sportswriters — even if it doesn’t necessarily make sense — is that there’s a distinction to be drawn between the supposedly widespread amphetamine use of the 1970s and the supposedly widespread steroid use of the 1990s. But according to those surveyed, there shouldn’t be. The moral judgment of the people appears to fall on both groups with equal fury.Harry: I really do wonder whether most people know that Mays may have used greenies. I tend to think not. If they did, there is no way that the polling numbers would look the way they do. I also tend to think that there is nothing ridiculous that Mays did in the sense that he looked normal, unlike Bonds who looked like someone shoved some orthopedic pillows in his arms. Not to mention that his head grew bigger than Donald Trump’s ego. It seemed natural. We tend to think of unnatural in how someone looks, not how they think.Neil: Right, and the bulked-up players and shifting head sizes gave fans and analysts a smoking gun of sorts. It added to the theatrical nature of the steroid hysteria. With a pill that doesn’t change appearance, you’re reduced to poring over stats and wondering whether a player’s out-of-the-blue power spike is just a career year or something much more sinister.Walt: But enough with the pharmaceutical advantages. What about the bigoted regime that kept black players out of the leagues? What about the competitive advantage conferred by excluding athletes based on the color of their skin?Walt: Kind of odd that baseball fans are nowhere near as mortified with pre-integration records standing than they are with stimulants. Neil, what’s the word on the effect that segregation had on baseball?Neil: One of the biggest tragedies of baseball’s color line is that we can’t know precisely how much the game’s pre-1947 stars benefited from only playing against white opponents. But we can certainly estimate how much more shallow the pool of available players was before the game was integrated. (As well as before the rise of Latin America and, now, Asia as a source of baseball talent.)As FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver notes in “Baseball Between the Numbers,” MLB was only drawing from a population of about 300,000 people per player in 1930. By 1960, when baseball was finally fully integrated, that number had more than doubled to 625,000, and it was a whopping 900,000 when Nate crunched the numbers in 2005. The bigger the talent pool, the tougher the competition, so it’s clear that pre-integration players had a major advantage in terms of the relative caliber of talent they played against.(A related note: Baseball’s level of talent is steadily increasing anyway as humans push the boundaries of athletic performance, which is another great reason statistics from the past can’t be compared to modern numbers straight-up.)Harry: My opinion on this is fairly simple: You can’t penalize players for things they didn’t control. Babe Ruth couldn’t play against a black player in the MLB even if he wanted to. It’s a tragedy that we were robbed of seeing Josh Gibson against Carl Hubbell, but we can’t go back and readjust the records.Walt: I don’t think it’s so much about penalizing players for things beyond their control as it’s about knocking down the idea that baseball was somehow defiled by pharmaceuticals. This nostalgia for baseball is wholly misguided — the Boston Red Sox integrated after Southern public schools! In 1959! — it’s not like this was an antiquated part of baseball history.Baseball’s commitment to some idyllic game that never existed — something that also manifests itself in a knee-jerk opposition to potential ways to improve the game, like the DH, speedier play and other experimentation — by now constitutes what I think is (on a long enough timespan) an existential threat for the league. The fact that more people aren’t more willing to look back in anger is a symptom of a much larger problem.Not to mention that at least the other two advantages at least made the game more interesting to watch. Segregation, if anything, made the game less interesting for fans out of mere spite. My main line? If you’re going to get indignant about steroids — something that unambiguously made the game more interesting — at least have the decency to be just as indignant about letting those segregated records stand un-asteriskedBut guys! We’re missing the point here. About 10 percent of Americans would strip Babe Ruth of his records! Including 8 percent of baseball fans. That’s awesome.Harry: What percentage of people believe we didn’t land on the moon?Walt: I mean Kubrick basically admitted as much in “The Shining,” man — learn how to read subtext. read more

Liverpool favorites to land PSGs Adrien Rabiot

first_imgParis Saint-Germain’s jewel and one of the most promising young talents in Europe could soon leave Parc des Princes, with Adrien Rabiot edging closer towards the winter exit.The 23-year-old midfielder has already rejected to extend his current contract that’s set to expire at the end of the ongoing campaign, opening the way for interested parties to start the negotiations as early as January.Although Rabiot plays a notable role under Thomas Tuchel, he seems desperate to leave the Parisians in the forthcoming period, searching for new challenges.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.According to the Daily Express, Liverpool are leading the chase for the France international ahead of Barcelona and Manchester United who also reportedly set their sights on the youngster.The same source states that bookmaker Coral place the Merseysiders as 2-1 favorites to wrap up a deal.Considering Fabinho and Naby Keita both failed to adapt to the Premier League so far, Jurgen Klopp plans to bring another midfielder to Anfield to partner James Milner and Georginio Wijnaldum in the center of the park.last_img read more

Neil Lennon reveals plan to sign two strikers

first_imgHibernian manager Neil Lennon has outlined his January transfer plans to sign two strikers for the club.Speaking from Dubai where the Hibernian squad is camped for warm-weather training, Lennon highlighted their need for investment in attack.“We want to bring in strikers if we can bring two in then great. But we’re hoping to at least bring one in just to add to what we have here,” he told Sky Sports.“At times it’s been a bit flat and we need that extra bit of competition and motivation for them all.”Rangers v Celtic - Ladbrokes Scottish PremiershipMatch Preview: Rangers vs Celtic Boro Tanchev – August 31, 2019 It is time for the first Old Firm derby of the 2019-20 campaign, as Rangers host Celtic tomorrow at 13:00 (CET).Lennon was asked what kind of message he’s sending to the current strikers at the club, he said: “Must be better. You know you can do better and I know you can do better.“But we want more competition in that area and we want more goals in that area.”Lennon since last month has been demanding for better strikers for the club.last_img read more

50 Years Later NASA Creates Tribute To 3 Astronauts Who Died In

first_img Share Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty ImagesApollo 1 astronauts Ed White (from left), Gus Grissom and Roger Chaffee, 1967. The astronauts died as a result of a fire in the cockpit during a training session on Jan. 27, 1967.Friday marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 1 fire that killed three astronauts during a routine test on the launchpad. The accident shocked NASA as the agency was rushing to meet President Kennedy’s 1961 challenge to have men on the moon by the end of the decade.The test was a dress rehearsal for the Apollo 1 crew — Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee. The ultimate goal was to check out the command module, NASA’s first three-man spacecraft that would take astronauts to the moon.The crew was rehearsing the real launch, which was about a month away. They were suited up and in the capsule running through checklists and testing equipment.But something sparked in the oxygen-rich environment. Within seconds, the capsule filled with flames, smoke and toxic gases.NASA Engineer John Tribe was working in the control room when it happened.“It was incomprehensible to us how on earth we could have a fire in the cockpit,” Tribe says.The astronauts were killed almost instantly. The entire incident lasted less than five minutes.“We had imagined the worst, we’d hoped for the best, it was not to be, “Tribe said. “We’d lost three of our team.”The accident halted the Apollo program as NASA scrambled to figure out what went wrong. Reporter George Alexander was one of only three journalists allowed to visit the capsule after the fire.“What burned? I’d have to say just about everything that was in there except for these few odd bits and pieces,” Alexander said. “Like a page which had only its edges slightly browned. This bit of parachute harness. But everything else burned.”The capsule was pressurized with 100 percent oxygen. In that environment, something not considered a fire hazard was extremely combustible. The hatch of the capsule opened inward, making it difficult for the crew to open it.After the accident, there were hundreds of significant changes to the capsule and safety procedures. The redesigned capsules would use a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen, reducing the fire risk. And a new hatch was designed that could be opened in just five seconds.Only 21 months later, NASA sent humans back into space aboard Apollo 7. And less than a year after that, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed Apollo 11 on the moon.Astronaut Michael Collins was also on that mission. He says if the fire on Apollo 1 hadn’t happened, it’s likely a similar accident would have occurred in space — and that could have led to the program’s cancellation.“Without it, very likely, we would have not landed on the moon as the president had wished by the end of the decade,” Collins says.The successes of the Apollo lunar program overshadowed the loss of the crew.For 50 years, NASA kept the Apollo 1 command module locked up — until now. Beginning Friday, the hatch from the burned capsule will be put on public display at the Kennedy Space Center as a tribute to the sacrifices of Grissom, White and Chaffee.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

WATCH Strong Winds Cause Hangar To Collapse At Hobby Airport

first_img Share Strong winds overnight caused a hangar at Hobby airport to collapse, just before midnight.No injuries were reported, according to officials.Senior AccuWeather Meteorologist Joe Lundberg said strong wind gusts can cause this type of damage.“There was a wind gust reported at the Hobby Airport at 60 miles per hour.” Lundberg said. “And that can cause some damage. It can flip over some small vehicles. Certainly, it can cause a lot of tree branches to come down. And certainly some damage, all sorts of little things can happen, with those kind of wind gusts.” Strong winds collapse hangar at Hobby Airport overnight https://t.co/BusaMVd17H pic.twitter.com/PxCp1acKOD— KHOU 11 News Houston (@KHOU) April 4, 2018Lundberg said the front had a history of producing severe weather toward north and northwest; with some hail in parts of central Texas, and strong winds in northeast Texas and parts of Louisiana, as well. Houston Airport System spokesman Bill Begley said the collapse caused millions of dollars of damage, and eight planes were damaged.Begley added it was a private hangar, and the overnight incident did not impact commercial flight schedules at Hobby Airport.last_img read more

After 2 Painful Years Elijah Cummings Will Be More Powerful

first_imgBy BEN TERRIS, The Washington PostWASHINGTON (AP) — When the word of the Lord came to Elijah, it arrived on a slip of paper tucked in a stranger’s bra.In 2017, Congressman Elijah E. Cummings had been laid up in a Johns Hopkins hospital bed for two months, crippled by pain after a difficult recovery from a heart valve replacement, when an interloper came bursting through the door, calling his name.“She reaches into her bosom and pulls out a note,” Cummings said recently. “She says, ‘The Lord has been waking me all night. … It was so important I thought I’d write it down. It says: He don’t mean you no harm, he’s just trying to get your attention. He wants you to know he ain’t finished with you yet.’”In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo, U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., poses in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Cummings endured two painful years. Soon he’ll be more powerful than ever. He is the soon-to-be chairman of the House Committee on Oversight. (Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via AP)Cummings, 67, recalled this story in an interview from his district office in Baltimore. His head: freshly shaved. His eyes: puffy. His large hands: swollen by gout. He wore big-platformed Velcro sneakers, which he had been shuffling around in all day with the help of a walker.If God was trying to get his attention, he wasn’t being subtle about it.This month, Democrats triumphed in elections across the country, winning back the House of Representatives. In doing so, Cummings returns to Congress hobbled physically but more powerful than ever. Armed with a gavel and subpoenas, he is the soon-to-be chairman of the House Committee on Oversight.For Cummings, this is the culmination of two years riddled with painful moments, some beyond his control and others that he walked into himself. He’d tried to work with President Trump only to have it blow up in his face. He’d been ignored by his Republican colleagues on the committee time and again. And he just couldn’t seem to stay out of the hospital.With a healthy heart, and in control, Cummings has limitless possible targets: hush money paid to a porn star on Trump’s behalf, citizenship questions on the census, security clearances revoked from the president’s critics, and dozens of other oh-yeah-remember-thats that slipped out of the churning news cycle unanswered.The difficulty won’t be finding things to look into. It will be figuring out what’s worth looking into. Cummings knows by now the risks that come with opening wounds voluntarily. After he recovered from heart surgery, he checked back into the hospital for another procedure — this time on his knee. But something went wrong. The knee got infected, and Cummings spent another three months at Hopkins.He emerged more aware than ever that there’s only a finite amount of time in this world.It will be up to him to make the best use of it.“Elijah Cummings was in my office,” Donald Trump told the New York Times in April of 2017.“And he said, ‘You will go down as one of the great presidents in the history of our country.’”It’s a prophecy that Cummings said he never actually offered, and one that, if he does his job well as Oversight Committee chairman, will almost certainly not come true.But early in Trump’s presidency, while many Democrats were angst-ridden, Cummings believed there was an opportunity for some good to come of it. He attended the inauguration and chatted with the president at the luncheon afterward about the need to lower prescription drug prices, an issue he’d long championed.“These drug companies are getting away with murder,” Cummings said the president told him.“We’ve got to do something about this.”Later, Cummings accepted an invitation to the Oval Office to discuss a bill he co-authored that would do just that, and he was heartened by Trump’s continued enthusiasm.As Cummings recalls, he offered the president advice: If you stop working to divide the country and work on issues that can unite them, then you could go down in history as a great president.He honestly believed it.The president had his base locked up no matter what, if Trump really believed shooting someone on Fifth Avenue wouldn’t make them stray, so then what would the risk be to work with Democrats? He used to be a Democrat, a little voice kept reminding Cummings.“Perhaps if I knew then what I know now, I wouldn’t have had a lot of hope,” Cummings said.“He is a man who quite often calls the truth a lie and calls a lie the truth.”A week after their meeting, Trump called Cummings to let him know he hadn’t forgotten about the issue and still planned to take action on it. Cummings never heard from Trump again.Does Cummings’s belief that he could work with Trump make him unbelievably naive or a man of unshakable faith?Cummings grew up in Baltimore the son of two former sharecroppers from South Carolina who moved to Baltimore and became preachers. He didn’t learn to dance until prom because his parents thought it was a sin. He still doesn’t know how to play cards.And it was his parents who drove him into public service, his own form of ministry. He rarely gives a speech without mentioning his mother and how she used to soak her feet in epsom salts, singing her prayers, each night after cleaning houses. When his father died of a heart attack, shortly after giving a sermon at a women’s detention center, Cummings arrived at the morgue to sort through his belongings. He found in his father’s wallet a note that Cummings had written him years earlier, folded and refolded so many times over the years that it had holes in the paper.“Did you know that you’re my hero, and everything I’d like to be,” the note said, quoting the song made popular by Bette Midler. “I can fly higher than an eagle because you are the wind beneath my wings.”Cummings’s spirituality can border on hokey like that, certainly earnest in a way that most politicians are not.At an election night watch party this year, he quoted a Garth Brooks song (“This ain’t comin’ from no prophet, just an ordinary man”). His eyes well up when he talks about his favorite musical, “The Lion King.” He meditates before each committee hearing, he said, picturing himself running down a long road, people in need of his help alongside him.There have been stumbles. Early in Cummings’s political career, he faced financial strains. According to a 1999 Baltimore Sun article, he owed more than $30,000 to the IRS (which he paid), and five times creditors took him to court to get him to pay $24,000 in overdue debts.Cummings told the paper he lacked money partially because of a major surgery that drained his bank account and because he helped support three children: a daughter he had with his then-estranged wife and two children he had with other women.“I have a moral conscience that is real central,” Cummings told the Sun then. “I didn’t ask the federal government or anyone else to do me any favors.”He remarried in 2008 (his second wife, Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, a policy consultant, withdrew a bid for Maryland governor while Elijah was in the hospital). He has lived in the same inner-city house for three decades and, before serving 22 years in Congress, spent 14 years in the Maryland House of Delegates.He learned his moral code in the pews and, perhaps equally important for someone going into politics, he learned the art of public speaking there, too. The first testimony he remembers giving in front of the congregation was thanking God for the integration of a local pool, which came after numerous marches where he was beaten by segregationists. He couldn’t have been more than 9.He used to run home from Sunday church service to lie on the floor and listen to Martin Luther King Jr.’s speeches on his transistor radio. He’s been thinking a lot about one of them.It was on the “interruptions of life.”“What he was saying was, don’t let yourself get distracted because you may never get back to what you were doing,” Cummings said. After two years of Twitter tantrums from the president, wild news conferences, attacks on the media, and other smokescreens, the lesson, Cummings said, is clear.“Trump, apparently was listening to Martin Luther King,” he said.The president, he said, certainly knows the power of a good distraction.Another excerpt from the Book of Elijah:“We’re in a storm,” he said from his office atop Capitol Hill. “And it’s a rough one. It’s not a question of whether the storm will end but when it will end. How much of our democracy will be saved?”Cummings had just finished his first Oversight Committee hearing since election night, one of his last as ranking member. For six years, he has sat beside the chairman, just out of reach of real power. He’s had his microphone cut off by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.). He was told he could not put a woman on a panel about contraceptives. In the past two years, he has had 64 subpoena requests ignored by Chairman Trey Gowdy of South Carolina.The storm has been raging. But now Cummings can do something about it,“I’m going to try and make people realize that in order to live the life they are living,” he said, “they need to have democracy, and it’s being threatened.”He’s no longer asking for answers; he’s demanding. Of course, that doesn’t mean the Trump administration will comply. Its officials have been known to be difficult, sometimes even with fellow Republicans.“I sent letters and subpoenas to the Trump administration and got no response,” Jason Chaffetz, the Oversight Committee’s Republican former chairman told The Post this month. “I was stymied every step of the way. What makes you think Elijah Cummings will get a response?”Cummings admits this is a concern.He also knows that his best bet to get anything done is to be focused, not to, as he told George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s “This Week,” hand out subpoenas “like somebody’s handing out candy on Halloween.”Cummings has been on the other side of high-profile hearings that felt to him like a sham.There was Operation Fast and Furious, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms andExplosives program that tried to track illegal weapons sales. He was the ranking member of the Select Committee on Benghazi, a Republican-led effort to investigate the 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya.Those investigations were derided by Democrats as politically motivated and, of course,Republicans will say the same about anything Cummings decides to investigateCummings says he wants to be judicious, but is that possible? How do you not try to peek at Trump’s tax returns, or figure out who exactly has been staying at Trump International Hotel in Washington, or determine how former Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt was able to get away with buying so many first-class airline tickets on taxpayers’ dime?“I can’t imagine anyone better qualified and more passionate about oversight than Elijah,” Gowdy said in an interview.But, even if Cummings is open and transparent and does everything by the book, there’s at least one Republican who won’t see it that way.“If the Democrats think they are going to waste Taxpayer Money investigating us at the House level, then we will likewise be forced to consider investigating them for all of the leaks of Classified information, and much else, at the Senate level,” Trump tweeted recently. “Two can play that game!”Is it possible that Democrats are getting carried away? Can Cummings really be the hero they need to stand up to Trump? After all, Cummings may want to maintain the moral high ground, but is that even possible in a fight with the president? Is it the best way to win — to bring a Bible to a knife fight?Leana Wen, the new president of Planned Parenthood, said it’s not for her to say, necessarily, but she knows a fighter when she sees one. She worked with Cummings during her time as the Baltimore health commissioner. She loved him so much she named her first child after him.“When he was in the hospital, I tried not to think … about what could happen,” she said. “As a physician, I know a lot about the worst-case scenarios because I’ve seen it.”The day she saw him for the first time out of the hospital, he looked and tired. She told him it was good to see him.“He said, ‘It’s good to be seen and not viewed, if you know what I mean,’” she recalled. “To me, that meant he was back.”Cummings tends to downplay his time in the hospital. It was just a little shortness of breath. Then a simple heart procedure that should have him home within three days. Then a gout flare-up and rehabilitation to gain back muscles lost from weeks unable to move.Yes, it was excruciatingly painful, he’ll say. But, no, he never really thought his life was in danger. He was always itching to get back.“If he were to slow down too much,” his younger brother James Cummings said, “it would probably kill him.”In that case, the next two years may be the healthiest of Elijah Cummings’s life.___Information from: The Washington Post, http://www.washingtonpost.comlast_img read more