Chabane was ‘a quiet strategist who worked for the people’

first_img20 March 2015Deputy President Cyril Rampahosa has called for a national song to be composed to celebrate the late Minister of Public Service and Administration Collins Chabane’s passion for humanity and zest for life.“To calm our deep-felt agony, we must find among our youth, artists who will take Minister Chabane’s harmonica and mbira to remind us of both the beauty and fragility of life,” Ramaphosa said at the official memorial service for the late minister, held at the Tshwane Events Centre in Pretoria on Thursday.Chabane passed away on Sunday, 15 March, with two of his protectors – Sergeants Lesiba Sekele and Lawrence Lentsoane – in an accident on the N1 between Mokopane and Polokwane in Limpopo province.Hundreds of mourners attended the memorial service including Chabane’s wife, Mavis, AU Chairperson Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, former President Nelson Mandela’s wife Graca Machel and government ministers.‘Unassailable optimism’Ramaphosa said Chabane had played the struggle, politics and his government work in the same the way he did his music – with great talent, commitment and certainty; but also with unassailable optimism, emotion, and a beguiling mixture of shyness and humour.“His compassion made him genuinely concerned about improving the lives of all South Africans, and this in turn led to him to being passionate about improving the performance of government,” Ramaphosa said.Chabane was one of the first people to assist when Limpopo was hit by floods along with neighbouring Mozambique in 2000. He was the MEC responsible for roads in the province at the time.“He spent whole nights in the pouring rain together with his department’s road maintenance units, battling to find a way across raging rivers, so that isolated communities could be reached,” Ramaphosa said.‘Genuine humility’A few months ago when a hospital in Limpopo had problems with its water supply during the weekend, Chabane travelled to the hospital, which was about 500km away, to arrange water for the hospital.He described the late minister as a man who was possessed with genuine confidence that only came with genuine humility.Chabane was humble, unassuming and committed to the struggle of South Africans people for a democratic, non-racial, non-sexist and prosperous South Africa, the deputy president said. “We know him to have been a quiet strategist in an occupation often given to populism and deafening rhetoric.“His comrades trusted him, had confidence in his abilities, and admired his work ethic. He was devoted to the ideals of our movement and the task of achieving a better life for all.”Agent for changeRamaphosa commended Chabane for being a good listener and for always being open to hearing others’ points of view.Chabane had natural curiosity and his love to debate was combined with his desire to continuously gain a better understanding of everything, Ramaphosa said. “He did not think that he knew it all, he was very much aware that he might be wrong about some things and he was willing to change his views on the basis of being presented with new evidence.”Chabane passed away at a time when he was hard at work to develop a new cadre of public servants that grasp their role as change agents.Ramaphosa said Chabane had left a proud and enduring legacy as he pioneered the outcomes monitoring and national evaluation system in government.Minister Chabane be laid to rest on Saturday at Xikundzu village in Malamulele, Limpopo. The Presidency announced on Tuesday that Chabane would receive a category one official funeral at the weekend.President Jacob Zuma has ordered that the national flag be flown at half-mast across the country on Saturday, the day of the funeral.The Presidency said a special email address had been created “to ensure that all messages reach the President and later the Chabane family”. You can email communication@presidency.gov.zaMembers of the public can send messages of support on social media, using the hashtag #RIPMinChabane. Send tweets to @PresidencyZA or write messages on the Presidency of the Republic of South Africa’s Facebook page.Source: SAnewslast_img read more

7 killed in Shimla bus accident, 21 injured

first_imgAt least seven people have been killed and 21 others injured when a State Transport Corporation bus veered off the road at Gajehri near Theog in anterior Shimla on Friday morning. The bus was on its way from Shimla to Sharontha village at Tikker in Rohru tehsil. Those who were seriously injured have been referred to Indira Gandhi Medical College Hospital in Shimla. The rescue operation is still on and the police along with local villagers are transferring the injured to the hospitals at Theog and Shimla. All the bodies and the injured have been identified, said the police. The cause of accident is yet to be ascertained. The driver suddenly lost control when the bus rolled down on the steep downhill drive from Theog to Chaila, said locals.last_img read more

Injuries to Pingoy, Ahanmisi bad news for Adamson

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Jarin takes blame for NU’s failed Final Four bid Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. View commentscenter_img “That’s bad news for us,” said Falcons head coach Franz Pumaren.Ahanmisi injured his ankle early in the first half while Pingoy suffered his later in the game.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutPingoy landed on Jasper Parker’s foot and was helped off the floot with 5:22 left in the game.No timetable has been set for the two players. Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa MOST READ Read Next QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Jerie Pingoy. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAdamson could march into the Final Four missing two crucial guards in Jerie Pingoy and Jerrick Ahanmisi.Both players twisted their left ankles in Adamson’s final eliminations game in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament Saturday at Smart Araneta Coliseum in a 71-54 loss to Far Eastern University.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Caroline Garcia retires due to back injury in first round of Brisbane International

first_imgCaroline Garcia was forced to retire from her first round match against Alize Cornet at the Brisbane International on Sunday due to a lower back injury.The fourth seed struggled with a back injury last season as well and was seen leaving the court teary eyed on Sunday.The 24-year-old won the first set 6-3 before Cornet claimed the second set 6-3 to force the all-French encounter go into a decider.Garcia was suffering from some discomfort and decided to take a medical timeout before the final set. Following that, she tried to hit a couple of serves before deciding to retire.WATCH”I’ve always had some issues with my back,” Garcia told reporters.”At the beginning of the match I felt a pain in my lower back and it was different than it is normally. It was getting worse and worse and in the end I couldn’t really move. There was no point to keep going.”However, she remains hopeful of playing the Australian Open next month.”I mean, it’s in two weeks, so it’s a long time…with the back it’s always complicated,” she added. “Especially mine, it’s really something I take care of, so it’s kind of surprising for it to show up like this. But we’ll do the best that we can.”It’s a sad sight for Garcia as she’s forced to retire from her match with Cornet at the start of the 3rd setGet well soon, Caro! #BrisbaneTENnis pic.twitter.com/as94hZHKSE- #BrisbaneTennis (@BrisbaneTennis) December 31, 2017Cornet will met Mirjana Lucic-Baroni in the second round after the Croatian, who travels full-time with her daughter, overcame Germany’s Tatjana Maria 6-4 4-6 6-0.advertisement”I’m very sorry for Caroline. I know what it’s like to have back pain,” Cornet, who went down to Karolina Pliskova in last year’s final, said in a courtside interview.”I hope she recovers for the next tournament in the Australian Open. I cannot say I’m glad to be through this way, but the adventure continues for me.”Last year, I had a super run to the final and I have very good memories. I hope to go as far as possible.”Elsewhere, seventh seed Anastasija Sevastova beat local favourite Sam Stosur 6-1 6-3, while Ana Konjuh tamed Kiki Bertens 6-1 6-2.In the men’s section, Ukraine’s Alexandr Dolgopolov caused a minor upset with a hard fought victory over sixth seed Diego Schwartzman of Argentina 6-4 7-6(3).(With inputs from Reuters)ALSO WATCH:last_img read more

Bill Nighy Supports The Robin Hood Tax

first_imgWith the names of politicians and the rich and famous making the headlines since the Panama Papers scandal, tax avoidance is front and centre on the minds of many, including some with the power to do something about it.In mid-June, a collection of countries are scheduled to introduce a financial transaction tax (FTT) called the Robin Hood Tax. This tax collected on financial transactions is to go towards the protection of public services, and to tackle poverty and climate change.Actor Bill Nighy has appeared on the front page of e-activist petition #TheTimeIsNow, where it says that leaders aren’t saying how much the tax will be because of pressure from banks. Those in favour of the tax are welcome to go to The Time Is Now webpage and fill in the rest of the statement, which begins: “The time is now for an FTT because…” The petition’s goal for 5,000 signatures is over half way there. The best reasons proposed will be sent directly to leaders.“History could be made this year with a tiny tax on transactions,” says Nighy. “They have a chance to make a profound and historic change in the way we order a chronically imbalanced world.”Copyright ©2016Look to the Starslast_img read more

Week 13 NFL Elo Ratings And Playoff Odds

A week before Thanksgiving, the NFL’s top teams had plenty to be grateful for. Eleven of the top 13 teams in Week 12’s edition of our Elo ratings won their games, with the lone exceptions either losing to another good team on the road (the Arizona Cardinals, then ranked No. 2, fell to the third-ranked Seattle Seahawks) or suffering a stunning upset (the Kansas City Chiefs’ ill-fated trip to Oakland). And eight of the bottom 10 teams lost, generating the widest spread this season between the league’s haves and have-nots (as measured by the standard deviation of every team’s Elo ratings).There’s been a lot of talk about 2014 being a season of parity in the NFL (especially after the aforementioned Raiders victory completed this year’s “circle of parity,” the phenomenon by which any team could claim superiority over another via the transitive property). In one sense, that’s accurate. There’s no dominant Super Bowl favorite: The New England Patriots, Green Bay Packers and Denver Broncos have gone through hot and cold periods over the past 12 weeks, and the Seahawks and San Francisco 49ers have not even consistently been favored to make the playoffs. Nobody knows what to make of the upstart Cardinals (now less so than ever). By that standard, this season is as wide open as any.But this year has also seen a stark disparity between the NFL’s good and bad teams. The 2014 season features the 10th-largest standard deviation of Elo ratings through 12 weeks of any season since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger and the second-largest since 1986 (trailing only the 2009 season).Nearly all of the most imbalanced seasons took place before the NFL instituted true free agency and a salary cap in the early 1990s, which evened out payroll spending across the league and prevented dominant teams from hoarding talent. These measures had the effect of increased parity, both within seasons and between them.Pockets of inequality still emerge from time to time, even in today’s equipoised NFL. But most of the teams at the bottom of our rankings were above average (some significantly so) at some point in the past few seasons. Late in 2012, the Houston Texans and Atlanta Falcons — now ranked No. 23 and No. 25, respectively — had Elo ratings that would rank second in the NFL right now. And among the bottom third of teams in this week’s rankings, Minnesota, Tampa Bay, Washington and the New York Giants also had above-average Elo ratings as recently as two seasons ago.The league’s bad teams look particularly bad right now, and the poor got even poorer this past weekend. But even at an imbalanced moment, you can see the handiwork of the NFL’s parity machine.Last week, we wrote about how the Denver Broncos were a team in disarray, losing more points of Elo rating over the previous three weeks than any team in the NFL. In this past Sunday’s game against the Miami Dolphins, it looked like disaster was imminent again — Denver’s win probability was down to 10.2 percent late in the third quarter — before Peyton Manning sparked a comeback victory for the Broncos.The game wasn’t especially crucial to the Broncos’ postseason odds (they gained just 8 percentage points of playoff probability last week), but in concert with the Chiefs’ stunning loss at Oakland, it had a big effect on the AFC West race. By the end of the weekend, the Broncos had gained 24 percentage points of division-win probability, bringing their chances to 79 percent. The Chiefs lost 25 percentage points — by far the week’s biggest change in division-win probability. What had been surprisingly close to a toss-up race for the AFC West is back under Denver’s control.Week 12 was pretty damaging to Kansas City’s playoff chances. A week ago, the team was looking at a 41 percent probability of chasing down the Broncos for the division, and it had the conference’s best chance of securing a wild card slot (42 percent). But with their AFC West odds dwindling, the Chiefs probably need the wild card to make the playoffs. It might seem as though the Chiefs are still well positioned in that department — the Dolphins had been their primary threat going into the weekend — but after the AFC North rivals Cincinnati Bengals and Baltimore Ravens both won, the AFC’s wild card picture is as crowded as ever.The NFC playoff picture didn’t change all that much, although the Seahawks are once again favorites to make the postseason after beating the Cardinals. Although the game could be seen as the proverbial “statement win” with regard to NFC West supremacy, the loss didn’t really affect Arizona’s playoff chances; the Cardinals are still 94 percent likely to be in.Elo’s had a few solid weeks against the point spread. Don’t let it fool you: You shouldn’t take these ratings to Vegas and bet with them. But it is always fun to compare the gambling lines to those which would be predicted by each team’s pregame Elo ratings.One of biggest differences this week between Elo and Vegas involves a marquee matchup, in which the Patriots travel to Green Bay to face the Packers. The Packers have been on a roll of late, gaining the most Elo rating points of any NFL team over the previous three weeks, but still they rank just sixth in Elo. At least some of that is because Green Bay entered the season ranked 17th in the league with a below-average 1495 Elo rating, owing to a relatively down 2013 season that saw quarterback Aaron Rodgers miss seven games.With Rodgers back and playing at an incredibly high level as of late, Vegas has reacted quickly. The oddsmakers clearly consider the Packers one of the two or three best teams in the NFL. For their part, the Patriots have been on fire as well, so the fact that they are three-point road underdogs implies that the market considers them about even with Green Bay. Elo thinks the Patriots are roughly four points better per game than the Packers at a neutral site, so it will be interesting to get some measure of a referendum on Vegas and Elo’s different opinions of the two teams.CORRECTION (3:53 p.m., Nov. 26, 2014): A previous version of the Week 13 NFL matchups table listed incorrect numbers for the Elo win percentages and point spreads. They and the language in the piece have been updated. read more

Roundtable All Of Baseball History Should Get An Asterisk

It always comes back to the use of performance-enhancing drugs. The “steroid era” may be over, but Major League Baseball is still dealing with its consequences. At the National Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony over the weekend, Craig Biggio was the only batter among the four new inductees. Although some of the greatest hitting records in the history of the sport occurred in the past 20 years, many position players can’t catch a break with Hall voters.So we ran a SurveyMonkey Audience poll asking Americans how they feel about steroids, amphetamines and the pre-integration era and then gathered FiveThirtyEight’s baseball fans to talk about the results (the following transcript has been lightly edited for length and clarity):Walt Hickey: It’s pretty clear the vast majority of people — even baseball fans — are not comfortable with just letting the records stand. Of everyone surveyed, 88 percent thought the records should be struck down entirely or have an indicator that there was some funny business going on.Neil Paine: I’m not surprised the majority of those polled want something — anything — to be done about the numbers compiled during the steroid era. Baseball is the most statistical of all the major sports, and it has always loved to foster the notion that you could compare, say, Honus Wagner’s stats to those of Alex Rodriguez side by side, without any adjustment, and still make a meaningful comparison. Sabermetricians have long acknowledged this as naive; between park effects and era adjustments, there are plenty of ways baseball stats need to be tweaked to level the playing field between different generations of players. But even for the lay fan, the age of PEDs [performance-enhancing drugs] destroyed any pretense that unadjusted numbers could be freely compared between eras, and I think that fact alone upset traditionalists as much as anything else.Harry Enten: I must admit that steroids to me is a highly emotional issue. Many of the players we associate with steroids are people we also associate with being jerks — people like Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and A-Rod. But the real question is: Where does it end? Is it that stats are changed? Are champions changed? There can be no doubt that many, if not all, of the champions for a period in the 1990s and 2000s had steroid users. We’re not going to go back and change winners. In a lot of this polling, people are making an emotional argument.Walt: I, on the other hand, could not care less about steroid use. I feel like this notion of the game as some platonic ideal that existed prior to the big bad performance enhancers showed up is patently false. Every era had its own competitive advantages, as we’ll talk about in a second, but it’s only the steroid issue — and not, you know, the players who had the competitive advantages of rampant stimulant use and not having to compete with black players — that seems to make people think The Game is not somehow Pure.Rob Arthur: I’m under no illusions the game of baseball is Pure (nor will it ever be), but I also don’t know if it was ever dirtier than it was during the steroid era. Cheating is and has always been rampant, both on and off the field, but with steroids, we have a means of cheating that seems particularly effective. You can see that both in the scientific literature, where steroids seem to improve strength by as much as 20 percent, but also on the baseball field, where we had some notable steroid users like Bonds smashing records left and right.Harry: But what about during the “deadball era” — specifically between 1912 (I think) and 1920, when you had the spitball among other things? Offensive numbers took a dive. There is clear physical evidence that a spitball (or scuffing the ball) is a big deal. Now using that wasn’t illegal when it first started, but neither were steroids. They are now, yet people look at them so much differently than the pitching statistics that were occurring in the 1910s.Rob: Harry, you definitely have a point. But I think one of the reasons steroids are so objectionable is because of the asymmetry they created between players: Some players who used them seemed to become almost inhumanly effective, others didn’t use them at all and gained no benefit, and still others used but didn’t improve substantially. When the spitball was legal, it was available to all pitchers, and I doubt that any pitcher’s spit was 50 percent more effective at decreasing offense than any other pitcher’s spit. (I am aware that once the spitball was banned, some players were grandfathered in and still allowed to use it. Obviously, that wouldn’t fly in the modern era.)Neil: And don’t even get me started debating whether Lasik surgery counts as “unnatural” and “performance-enhancing.”Walt: Yeah, Tommy John called — he wants his pitching speed back. We will get back to the 1920s era of baseball soon enough, Enten. For now: My favorite part of this was comparing how different fan bases cared about steroids based on how much their teams gained from steroid use.Editor’s Note: On Friday, we introduced the idea of a steroid “discount” — a penalty in percentage terms that would be deducted from players’ individual statistics if they were found to be using PEDs. Our poll asked respondents to recommend said discount, which we can also break down by team fandom.The following table is color-coded by how much (red) or how little (white) each team’s fans would penalize steroid-using players.1Specifically, players who were suspended for PED offenses, were linked to the Biogenesis scandal, were named in the Mitchell Report or whose failed drug tests were leaked to the media. Because some teams had far more fans respond than others — and some teams’ fans hardly voted at all — the columns have been color-coded to represent a combination of average response and the number of respondents. In other words, results have been regressed to the mean based on sample size. Likewise, the correlations at the bottom of the table were weighted by the number of respondents from each fan base.Walt: Hot damn, Giants.Neil: It’s interesting that, as fandom intensifies, a relationship does begin to materialize between how much the voter’s favorite team relied on steroid users and how much tolerance he or she has for steroid users’ stats.If we look at all of our survey’s respondents — including those who were and were not self-professed baseball fans — there’s essentially no relationship between team steroid reliance and how much steroid-tainted stats the voter would recommend taking away. But when you throw out non-fans, a small2Correlation: -0.2 relationship emerges. Fan bases whose stars used steroids to generate more wins, whether on a per-season basis or as a percentage of the team’s total, tended to want steroid users to be punished less.Then again, it’s a slight relationship at best. While San Francisco Giants fans — hello Barry Bonds! — wanted juicers dinged much less than the average fan base, fans of the Oakland Athletics and Chicago Cubs (who rank fourth and fifth in the degree to which they were helped by steroid-using batters) asked for some of the highest penalties of any group of rooters.But that’s not the only way to measure the cognitive dissonance between a fan’s acceptance of steroids and the degree to which his or her team benefited from them.Walt: I whipped this up really quickly: It’s the scatterplot of teams, with that “how much did they gain from PEDs” metric plotted against the percentage of their fan base that said they thought the records of steroid users should be struck. What an interesting relationship:Walt: It’s a small sample size, but I really love that fans of teams that didn’t gain a lot from PEDs seem more likely to desire retribution against players who did.Rob: The relationship between steroid contribution and desire for retribution is really fascinating and upholds a long-held suspicion of mine. It also suggests (again) that these attitudes are largely driven by emotions: If my team benefited, then steroids were OK, but if not, steroids were terrible! It shows that fans, in particular, have a hard time divorcing their own fandom from the questions about how much steroids benefited particular players and how much we should care as a result.Walt: So then the question becomes where do we draw the line when it comes to performance-enhancing things in each era? I personally think it’s bullshit that people get so riled up about steroids and not, for instance, the widespread amphetamine use in MLB in the era prior to it.It turns out America agrees!Walt: So, Neil, who would this affect?Neil: Like you said, it’s pretty widely acknowledged that amphetamine use was prevalent in MLB throughout much of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. During a 1985 drug trial, former Mets and Pirates first baseman John Milner testified that he had received “greenies” (amphetamines) from Hall of Famers Willie Mays and Willie Stargell at various times during his career, and Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt said the substance was “widely available in major-league clubhouses” when he played.So it’s at least possible — if not probable — that some of that era’s greatest superstars used a now-banned substance to sharpen their focus and boost their energy levels. (Even if the evidence is mixed over whether greenies actually even help athletic performance.)Walt: I feel like higher focus and higher energy is probably a nice thing for batters to have. I imagine their record collections were remarkably well-organized as well.I’m pretty happy to see some consistency here. I compared how people answered the steroid question with how they answered the stimulant question, and 88 percent of respondents (and 86 percent of fans) stuck to their guns and replied with the same answer they gave for steroid policy. It seems like at least among the general population there’s a lot more consistency with how to handle the policy than there is in the league.Still, it’s surprising that at the end of the day, 44 percent of Americans would strip away statistical accomplishments from amphetamine users in the era of Willie Mays, Hank Aaron and Mickey Mantle.Neil: Agreed. The general attitude among sportswriters — even if it doesn’t necessarily make sense — is that there’s a distinction to be drawn between the supposedly widespread amphetamine use of the 1970s and the supposedly widespread steroid use of the 1990s. But according to those surveyed, there shouldn’t be. The moral judgment of the people appears to fall on both groups with equal fury.Harry: I really do wonder whether most people know that Mays may have used greenies. I tend to think not. If they did, there is no way that the polling numbers would look the way they do. I also tend to think that there is nothing ridiculous that Mays did in the sense that he looked normal, unlike Bonds who looked like someone shoved some orthopedic pillows in his arms. Not to mention that his head grew bigger than Donald Trump’s ego. It seemed natural. We tend to think of unnatural in how someone looks, not how they think.Neil: Right, and the bulked-up players and shifting head sizes gave fans and analysts a smoking gun of sorts. It added to the theatrical nature of the steroid hysteria. With a pill that doesn’t change appearance, you’re reduced to poring over stats and wondering whether a player’s out-of-the-blue power spike is just a career year or something much more sinister.Walt: But enough with the pharmaceutical advantages. What about the bigoted regime that kept black players out of the leagues? What about the competitive advantage conferred by excluding athletes based on the color of their skin?Walt: Kind of odd that baseball fans are nowhere near as mortified with pre-integration records standing than they are with stimulants. Neil, what’s the word on the effect that segregation had on baseball?Neil: One of the biggest tragedies of baseball’s color line is that we can’t know precisely how much the game’s pre-1947 stars benefited from only playing against white opponents. But we can certainly estimate how much more shallow the pool of available players was before the game was integrated. (As well as before the rise of Latin America and, now, Asia as a source of baseball talent.)As FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver notes in “Baseball Between the Numbers,” MLB was only drawing from a population of about 300,000 people per player in 1930. By 1960, when baseball was finally fully integrated, that number had more than doubled to 625,000, and it was a whopping 900,000 when Nate crunched the numbers in 2005. The bigger the talent pool, the tougher the competition, so it’s clear that pre-integration players had a major advantage in terms of the relative caliber of talent they played against.(A related note: Baseball’s level of talent is steadily increasing anyway as humans push the boundaries of athletic performance, which is another great reason statistics from the past can’t be compared to modern numbers straight-up.)Harry: My opinion on this is fairly simple: You can’t penalize players for things they didn’t control. Babe Ruth couldn’t play against a black player in the MLB even if he wanted to. It’s a tragedy that we were robbed of seeing Josh Gibson against Carl Hubbell, but we can’t go back and readjust the records.Walt: I don’t think it’s so much about penalizing players for things beyond their control as it’s about knocking down the idea that baseball was somehow defiled by pharmaceuticals. This nostalgia for baseball is wholly misguided — the Boston Red Sox integrated after Southern public schools! In 1959! — it’s not like this was an antiquated part of baseball history.Baseball’s commitment to some idyllic game that never existed — something that also manifests itself in a knee-jerk opposition to potential ways to improve the game, like the DH, speedier play and other experimentation — by now constitutes what I think is (on a long enough timespan) an existential threat for the league. The fact that more people aren’t more willing to look back in anger is a symptom of a much larger problem.Not to mention that at least the other two advantages at least made the game more interesting to watch. Segregation, if anything, made the game less interesting for fans out of mere spite. My main line? If you’re going to get indignant about steroids — something that unambiguously made the game more interesting — at least have the decency to be just as indignant about letting those segregated records stand un-asteriskedBut guys! We’re missing the point here. About 10 percent of Americans would strip Babe Ruth of his records! Including 8 percent of baseball fans. That’s awesome.Harry: What percentage of people believe we didn’t land on the moon?Walt: I mean Kubrick basically admitted as much in “The Shining,” man — learn how to read subtext. read more

Womens lacrosse Ohio State tops Cincinnati behind 17 goals

Ohio State senior midfielder Megan McGillis handles the ball in the Buckeyes’ 13-9 win over Vermont on Feb. 12 at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. Credit: James King | Lantern reporterThe Ohio State women’s lacrosse team (3-0) scored early and often in its 17-8 win over Cincinnati (0-1) on Sunday. The Buckeyes solved their early-scoring woes of the previous two games, netting five unanswered goals in the first four minutes of play.“The theme the whole week was getting off to a fast start,” coach Alexis Venechanos said. “I felt like we came in really focused and we were really on a mission. We knew Cincinnati was going to be well coached.”This was the sixth meeting between the two schools and the third in the past three seasons. The Buckeyes’ win kept them undefeated in six meetings against the Bearcats, with the series dating back to 2008.Within the first two minutes, sophomore midfielders Mackenzie Maring and Erika Keselman scored giving OSU the early lead. Then, for the second time this season, freshman midfielder Liza Hernandez scored two goals within 30 seconds, her first two of four on the day.“We wanted to just come out and play our game,” Hernandez said. “It feels amazing (to score four times). I just know I couldn’t have done it without my teammates and everyone around me.”Senior midfielder Morgan Fee added a goal of her own — her first of two in the first half — putting the Buckeyes up 5-0 with 25:16 remaining. The Bearcats would win the next draw, gaining possession of the ball for the first time in the game. Cincinnati took advantage of their first time with the ball when junior midfielder Brooke Kovinsky scored the first goal of the year for her program at the 24:52 mark in the first half. OSU went on to win 11 draw controls and take 25 shots compared to Cincinnati’s five and 12, respectively, showing how much the Buckeyes dominated the ball early. Venechanos said that a lot of that is attributed to the stellar play of Fee, who won 7 draw controls in the game.“She stepped up huge,” Venechanos said. “We put her in for the last five draws of the last game and she got those. So she’s been working really hard and I’m really happy for her.”Maring and Keselman again would score back-to-back goals moving OSU’s lead up six with 22:06 left in the first half. The Bearcats would respond with two goals from freshmen Monica Borzillo and McKenna Rushford.Up 7-3, OSU went on a 5-1 scoring run to close out the half, which included a hat trick from junior attacker Molly Wood, Fee’s second of the game and sophomore midfielder Baley Parrott’s sixth goal of the year.“We were just ready to show what we are and show what we’re made of this year,” Wood said. “We were firing on all cylinders today, we were all in control. It was really fun.”The Buckeyes opened up the scoring yet again in the second half when freshman attacker Alex Vander Molen scored her first of the day, second of the year, giving OSU a 13-4 lead. Cincinnati would try and fight its way back into the contest, going on a 3-1 scoring run cutting the Buckeyes’ lead to seven with 13:43 to play.OSU was plagued with turnovers in the second half, committing eight, turning their offense stagnant until Hernandez was able to score her fourth goal with 5:42 left on the clock. The Bearcats netted another goal, but OSU closed the game out with two more goals giving them the win, 17-8. One goal came from junior attacker Lauren Sherry and the other from sophomore attacker Alyssa Amorison in her season debut for the Buckeyes.For the second straight game freshman goalie Jillian Rizzo collected double digit saves, this time 11 on the day. Rizzo has been a constant safety blanket for this OSU team, helping them hold leads and coming up with big saves when needed.“She’s amazing,” Hernandez said. “She literally keeps us in games sometimes. I know she’s a freshman but she really doesn’t play like a freshman and we definitely need that.”In a game that was moved to Ohio Stadium due to some serendipitous February weather, OSU led from wire to wire. The Buckeyes, who took 40 shots compared to the Bearcats’ 25, were able to couple an aggressive attack on the offensive end with stout defensive play. “It’s always fun to score in the ‘Shoe,” Wood said. “But it was a team effort and that was what was really special.”OSU has the Stanford Cardinal up next, Friday at home at 6 p.m. Stanford is currently 1-3 on the year and have a game at Saint Mary’s on Tuesday before making the trip to Columbus.“Stanford is going to give us new challenges,” Venechanos said. “So we’re going to watch film this week, work on ourselves and then worry about Stanford … but it will be a big test for us.” read more

Mens hockey adjusting to new skin

The Ohio State men’s hockey season starts this Friday with new head coach Mark Osiecki at the helm. “With a new coaching staff you have a different feel as a team,” senior forward Sergio Somma said. “It’s kind of like you have a new set of skin.” They are hoping their new ‘skin’ will change things for the team who finished last season with a disappointing 15-18-6 record. “We have to try to create our culture,” Osiecki said. “We’d like to play an up-tempo, very aggressive offensive game.” The differences don’t end on the ice. “Coach (Osiecki) expects you to be great off the ice,” senior forward Peter Boyd said. “If you’re struggling off the ice, it’s going to relate on the ice.” The attention to detail outside the rink has resulted in more contact with the coaches through phone calls and e-mails, Somma said. The increased communication has resulted in a better understanding of the coach’s goals. “There’s kind of a point to everything that we are doing. He explains it very thoroughly,” senior goaltender Dustin Carlson said. “Guys know exactly what they are doing and why they are doing it and how to incorporate it to the game itself.” Players welcome the increase in detail and intensity. “You want to get pushed to a level that you feel uncomfortable because that makes you a better player,” Boyd said. Somma agreed. “He is going to push you to that edge, that physical edge and that mental edge that you need to get better,” he said. Seventeen of the players being pushed are upperclassmen. “I think (having so many upperclassmen) is positive on the front that there’s going to be a handful of these kids that are tremendous kids, very good hockey players that are going to definitely grasp what we’re talking about here and it’s going to help their careers,” Osiecki said. The coach was also excited about playing six of the first seven games on the road. “It brings your team close together,” Osiecki said. “It’s going to really tell us what we have, who can handle some tough situations, who can play at an up-tempo pace on a big ice sheet — we’ll learn a lot after the first few games.” Despite the early road trips and a losing record a year ago, expectations remain high. “There is no reason why we can’t win a (Central Collegiate Hockey Association Conference) title,” Somma said. Pre-season polls predict the Buckeyes to finish eighth out of eleven teams in the conference by the media and no player was on the preseason all-conference team. “I think we have a great team but it’s not going to come easy,” Boyd said. Osiecki was more concerned with implementing the proper attitude, indicating that if that was done, the wins would come. “Our goal is to develop the culture that we think that OSU hockey is going to bring to the table,” he said. “We want kids that are going to come in here and mature as hockey players and mature as a person away from the rink.” The team will showcase its new culture this Friday as the Buckeyes travel to Quinnipiac University (Hamden, Conn.). The puck is scheduled to drop at 7 p.m. read more

Dalic not worried about players fitness

first_imgCroatia coach is not worried about his team’s fitness ahead of the World Cup final, according to FourFourTwo.Croatia head coach Zlatko Dalic has said he’s not worried about his team’s physical condition as they prepare to face France in the World Cup final on Sunday.Croatia have played 120minutes on three separate occasions in these World Cup so far.They defeated England 2-1 after extra time thanks to goals from Ivan Perisic and Mario Mandzukic to advance to their first ever FIFA World Cup final.Euro 2020Euro 2020 Qualifiers Betting: 06/09/19 Stuart Heath – September 6, 2019 With the international break in full-swing, here at Ronaldo.com we are going to take a look at Thursday’s Euro 2020 qualifiers match-betting odds.With a…“Everyone knows what’s at stake and the players know what it means to play in a World Cup final. I hope we can overcome the fatigue and everyone will be able to play but if not we’ve good substitutes who are ready to play so I’m not now worried,” Dalic told journalists.Twenty years since making their first appearance in a World Cup, Croatia will be hoping to win their first ever World Cup come Sunday when the face France at the Luzhniki stadium.Zlatko Dalic and his players have been outstanding so far at the World Cup winning all group games in a group that consisted of Argentina, Nigeria and Iceland.They also defeated Denmark and host nation Russia on penalties in the second-round and quarter-final respectively.last_img read more