Man jailed after leading Border Patrol on a high speed chase on

first_imgMan jailed after leading Border Patrol on a high speed chase on the I-8 Posted: November 30, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A 21-year-old man was behind bars today on suspicion of leading Border Patrol agents on a high-speed pursuit that ended when he crashed the truck he was driving on  Interstate 8 in Boulevard, killing three of the suspected undocumented immigrants riding unrestrained in the pickup and injuring the other seven.Luis Alberto Virgen, a U.S. citizen who lives in Tijuana, allegedly sped off when the federal personnel tried to pull over the passenger-packed white Chevrolet Silverado he was driving near the Mexican border in eastern San Diego County shortly before 4:30 p.m. Thursday, according to the California Highway Patrol.With the agents giving chase, Virgen entered Interstate 8 at Buckman Springs Road and fled to the east briefly before exiting at Ribbonwood Road and re-entering the freeway, this time headed west, the Border Patrol reported.After fleeing for several more miles, the suspect ran over a tire-flattening spike strip that agents had laid across the roadway in his path east of Crestwood Road, according to the federal agency.About a minute later, the Silverado — occupied by a single passenger in the front and the rest in the cargo bed — veered off the interstate, went up a dirt embankment, became airborne, overturned  and rolled back down the sloping roadside onto the freeway.Virgen was the only one in the truck wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash, and the others were ejected, CHP public-affairs Officer Travis Garrow said.Two of the male passengers and the sole female member of the group died at the scene of the wreck. The names of the deceased were withheld pending family notification.Medics took Virgen and the surviving passengers to a hospital for treatment of moderate to serious injuries, Garrow said.About an hour after the fatal accident, Border Patrol personnel in the area came across another vehicle believed to have been involved in the apparent human-smuggling attempt and arrested a second man. The suspect’s name was not released.Virgen was booked into San Diego Central Jail early this morning on suspicion of three counts of vehicular manslaughter. He was being held on $150,000 bail pending arraignment, scheduled for Tuesday afternoon. KUSI Newsroom November 30, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: KUSI, Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday May 13 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Monday, May 13, 2019:#1) Wilmington Board of Selectmen MeetingThe Wilmington Board of Selectmen meets at 7pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. (An Executive Session precedes the meeting at 6:15pm). Read the agenda HERE.#2) Wilmington Historical Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Historical Commission meets at 7pm at the Town Museum. Read the agenda HERE.#3) Wilmington Housing Authority MeetingThe Wilmington Housing Authority meets at 5pm in Deming Way’s Community Hall. Read the agenda HERE.#4) Woburn Street School’s School Advisory Council MeetingThe Woburn Street School’s School Advisory Council meets at 3pm in the Woburn Street School’s Teachers Room. Read the agenda HERE.#5) Tech Buddies Drop-InThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Tech Buddies Drop-In Session from 2:30pm to 3:30pm. Need technology help, but Brad isn’t here? Drop in at a Tech Buddies session! Tech Buddies is a new volunteer program connecting teens and members of the Wilmington community in need of assistance navigating their phones, tablets, cameras, and the Cloud.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, September 9, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, June 10, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, March 11, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Migrant Families Arrive In Busloads As Border Crossings Hit 10Year High

first_img Share Ramon Espinosa/APHonduran migrants surrender to the U.S. Border Patrol after crossing a border wall into the United States. According to new federal data, the number of migrants apprehended crossing the border in recent months has surged.The U.S. Border Patrol apprehended more than 66,000 migrants at the Southern border in February, the highest total for a single month in almost a decade.The majority of those arrested were migrant families or children traveling alone or without a parent, according to figures released Tuesday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Many of the migrants say they’re fleeing criminal gangs and poverty in Central America to seek asylum in the United States.“This is clearly both a border security and humanitarian crisis,” said CBP Commissioner Kevin McAleenan at a press briefing.Between October and last week, Border Patrol agents have picked up more than 260,000 people — a 90 percent jump over the same period a year ago.“The entire system right now is at full capacity. Actually, it’s overwhelmed,” said Manuel Padilla, a veteran Border Patrol agent who’s now director of Joint Task Force-West in San Antonio, part of the Department of Homeland Security.Even with the recent climb, illegal border crossings are still well below historical highs. But the makeup of the migrant population has changed dramatically from 20 years ago, when it was mostly single men from Mexico. Border Patrol officials say their infrastructure wasn’t designed for the flood of migrant families and children arriving now.“Everything is maxed out and it’s causing a lot of issues, because the agents are being assigned to areas that are not border security related,” Padilla said, like providing food and medical care for the families and children in their custody.Since last year, Border Patrol agents say, they have routinely encountered large groups of a hundred or more migrants at the border, many of them arriving by bus from Guatemala. According to immigration authorities, the passengers consist almost entirely of families and children who are looking for Border Patrol agents to turn themselves in to. Agents say they’ve encountered 70 large groups since last year.That leaves agents scrambling to transport and process the migrants, Padilla said, and allows drug traffickers to take advantage of the distraction.Humanitarian groups near the border say the surge of migrant families is straining their resources too.“It takes an immense effort to do this,” said Ruben Garcia, the director of Annunciation House, a nonprofit organization in El Paso, Texas, that provides shelter, food and medical care to migrants after they’re released from government custody.Most migrants spend just a few days in El Paso, Garcia said, before joining friends or relatives elsewhere in the country, where they’ll wait for their day in immigration court.President Trump has decried the surge of illegal border crossers from Mexico as “an invasion” — and a chief reason that the United States needs to extend its border barriers.But Padilla, the Border Patrol veteran, believes that a wall alone will not stop these migrants.Many of the migrants are crossing in areas that already have border fencing. And they’re not trying to evade the Border Patrol, Padilla said. In fact, these asylum-seekers are trying to turn themselves in as soon as they set foot on U.S. soil.“So the wall is not going to do anything with this population,” Padilla said. “This requires a legislative fix.”Immigration hard-liners say the U.S. needs to close what they call “loopholes” in the law that allow Central American migrants to avoid quick deportation and that prevent immigration authorities from detaining families for long periods of time.Migrant advocates counter that the Trump administration has made the problem at the Southern border worse by allowing just a few migrant families a day to cross at legal ports of entry. They believe that’s driving many migrants to cross illegally in big groups and in remote stretches of the border.“They’re very vulnerable people,” said Garcia at Annunciation House. “Let’s strive not to lose or let go of our history as a people of immigrants, who are profoundly committed to human rights.”Humanitarian groups and immigration authorities are bracing for even more migrants in the months ahead. The number of illegal border crossers typically crests in the spring, as the temperatures warm.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more