Neil Lennon reveals plan to sign two strikers

first_imgHibernian manager Neil Lennon has outlined his January transfer plans to sign two strikers for the club.Speaking from Dubai where the Hibernian squad is camped for warm-weather training, Lennon highlighted their need for investment in attack.“We want to bring in strikers if we can bring two in then great. But we’re hoping to at least bring one in just to add to what we have here,” he told Sky Sports.“At times it’s been a bit flat and we need that extra bit of competition and motivation for them all.”Rangers v Celtic - Ladbrokes Scottish PremiershipMatch Preview: Rangers vs Celtic Boro Tanchev – August 31, 2019 It is time for the first Old Firm derby of the 2019-20 campaign, as Rangers host Celtic tomorrow at 13:00 (CET).Lennon was asked what kind of message he’s sending to the current strikers at the club, he said: “Must be better. You know you can do better and I know you can do better.“But we want more competition in that area and we want more goals in that area.”Lennon since last month has been demanding for better strikers for the club.last_img read more

Man jailed after leading Border Patrol on a high speed chase on

first_imgMan jailed after leading Border Patrol on a high speed chase on the I-8 Posted: November 30, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A 21-year-old man was behind bars today on suspicion of leading Border Patrol agents on a high-speed pursuit that ended when he crashed the truck he was driving on  Interstate 8 in Boulevard, killing three of the suspected undocumented immigrants riding unrestrained in the pickup and injuring the other seven.Luis Alberto Virgen, a U.S. citizen who lives in Tijuana, allegedly sped off when the federal personnel tried to pull over the passenger-packed white Chevrolet Silverado he was driving near the Mexican border in eastern San Diego County shortly before 4:30 p.m. Thursday, according to the California Highway Patrol.With the agents giving chase, Virgen entered Interstate 8 at Buckman Springs Road and fled to the east briefly before exiting at Ribbonwood Road and re-entering the freeway, this time headed west, the Border Patrol reported.After fleeing for several more miles, the suspect ran over a tire-flattening spike strip that agents had laid across the roadway in his path east of Crestwood Road, according to the federal agency.About a minute later, the Silverado — occupied by a single passenger in the front and the rest in the cargo bed — veered off the interstate, went up a dirt embankment, became airborne, overturned  and rolled back down the sloping roadside onto the freeway.Virgen was the only one in the truck wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash, and the others were ejected, CHP public-affairs Officer Travis Garrow said.Two of the male passengers and the sole female member of the group died at the scene of the wreck. The names of the deceased were withheld pending family notification.Medics took Virgen and the surviving passengers to a hospital for treatment of moderate to serious injuries, Garrow said.About an hour after the fatal accident, Border Patrol personnel in the area came across another vehicle believed to have been involved in the apparent human-smuggling attempt and arrested a second man. The suspect’s name was not released.Virgen was booked into San Diego Central Jail early this morning on suspicion of three counts of vehicular manslaughter. He was being held on $150,000 bail pending arraignment, scheduled for Tuesday afternoon. KUSI Newsroom November 30, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: KUSI, Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday May 13 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Monday, May 13, 2019:#1) Wilmington Board of Selectmen MeetingThe Wilmington Board of Selectmen meets at 7pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. (An Executive Session precedes the meeting at 6:15pm). Read the agenda HERE.#2) Wilmington Historical Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Historical Commission meets at 7pm at the Town Museum. Read the agenda HERE.#3) Wilmington Housing Authority MeetingThe Wilmington Housing Authority meets at 5pm in Deming Way’s Community Hall. Read the agenda HERE.#4) Woburn Street School’s School Advisory Council MeetingThe Woburn Street School’s School Advisory Council meets at 3pm in the Woburn Street School’s Teachers Room. Read the agenda HERE.#5) Tech Buddies Drop-InThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Tech Buddies Drop-In Session from 2:30pm to 3:30pm. Need technology help, but Brad isn’t here? Drop in at a Tech Buddies session! Tech Buddies is a new volunteer program connecting teens and members of the Wilmington community in need of assistance navigating their phones, tablets, cameras, and the Cloud.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, September 9, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, June 10, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, March 11, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Republicans boycott Twitter ad spending after McConnell campaign account locked

first_img Tags Comments 14 Trump criticizes ‘censorship’ on social media, SpaceX… Following similar tweets from the House and Senate GOP campaign organizations, the National Republican Campaign Committee joined the ad spending stand-off. “I have directed the @nrcc to immediately halt all spending with @Twitter until they correct their inexcusable targeting of @Team_Mitch. We will stand firmly with our friends against anti-conservative bias,” NRCC director Parker Hamilton Poling tweeted Thursday.Republican lawmakers have accused Silicon Valley giants of bias before. Earlier this week, President Donald Trump, without evidence, accused Google of anticonservative bias in a series of now-deleted tweets.Trump alleged that Google is trying to “illegally subvert” the next election. “All very illegal,” he tweeted. “We are watching Google very closely!”Originally published Aug. 8, 2:44 p.m. PT.Correction, 3:47 p.m.: An earlier version of this story had the incorrect Twitter account that was locked. It was McConnell’s official campaign account. Also, the story misstated the day the account was locked. It was Wednesday. Update, Aug. 9: Adds that Twitter will allow the video, with a sensitive media warning. The Twitter account of Sen. Mitch McConnell’s campaign has since been restored, and the video has been removed.  Win McNamee/Getty Images After Twitter temporarily locked the campaign account of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a string of leading Republican campaign committees announced an ad spending boycott against the social media platform. McConnell’s official campaign account was locked Wednesday after his team posted a video of protesters outside his Louisville, Kentucky, home earlier this week.Twitter’s blanket policy bans videos that include violent threats, even from those who receive such threats. The video in question, which also aired on Fox News, featured protest chants calling McConnell “murder turtle,” and shouts from the crowd inciting violence against him. Twitter told CNET in a statement that McConnell’s campaign account was locked because the video “violated our violent threats policy, specifically threats involving physical safety.”McConnell’s campaign account has since been restored.On Friday, Twitter said it reviewed the case more closely after multiple appeals and will allow the video to be visible with a sensitive media warning.”Going forward, the video will be visible on the service with a sensitive media interstitial and only in cases where the Tweet content does not otherwise violate the Twitter Rules,” the company’s communications team tweeted. Going forward, the video will be visible on the service with a sensitive media interstitial and only in cases where the Tweet content does not otherwise violate the Twitter Rules. https://t.co/Cuvh305ERA— Twitter Comms (@TwitterComms) August 9, 2019center_img Now playing: Watch this: Mobile Tech Industry Mobile Apps Digital Media Politics Share your voice 1:23 Twitter Donald Trumplast_img read more

Airtel acquires Aircels 4G spectrum for Rs3500 crore

first_imgIndia’s Bharati Airtel will spend Rs.3500 crore to acquire the fourth-generation (4G) spectrum from Aircel, the company said in a filing to stock exchange. The acquisition of 20 megahertz (MHz) 2300 frequency in eight telecom circles in the country will make Airtel a pan-India 4G service provider.The Sunil Mittal-owned telecom carrier, with this latest acquisition, will be locking horns with the only other pan-India 4G licence holder, Reliance Jio Infocomm. A unit of the Mukesh Ambani-owned Reliance Industries Ltd, Reliance Jio, is preparing to launch its 4G services in the second half of 2016.Aircel’s spectrum, valid up to 2030, will cover circles of Tamil Nadu, Bihar, Jammu and Kashmir, West Bengal, Assam, the Northeast, Andhra Pradesh, and Odisha.Citing sources the Economic Times reported that the deal will also help Aircel to reduce debt and perhaps fulfill a merger-condition with Reliance Communication (RCom), a unit owned by the other Ambani brother, Anil.The Airtel-Aircel deal comes a fortnight after Airtel’s 4G spectrum acquisition of 1800 MHz band in six circles for Rs. 4,428 crore from Videocon. According to the report, this was a second such acquisition, following RCom’s acquisition of Sistema Shyam TeleServices (MTS), since the government allowed trading of airwaves in October 2015.The liberalisation of rules for spectrum trading in India is seeing a consolidation in the telecom sector. The competition in a space crowded with 11 operators has kept the cost of spectrum high while tariff-wars offered low prices, in turn driving down the profits. The unhealthy trend is adding pressure on the already stressed balance sheet of telcos, said Mint.The daily quoted Alok Shinde of Ascentius Consulting as saying, “technological change had accompanied the evolution of the telecom market”. He said the auction of 4G in the 2300MHz band happened in a context of pre-inception business model around TD-LTE (time-division long-term evolution) technology in 2010. It was a standard with little validation anywhere in the world then, but today there is greater credence both among the technology and the business model, he added.ET reported that most telcos which acquired 4G airwaves in 2010 have even failed to meet the roll-out obligations, therefore facilitating a consolidation exercise.India’s top three telcos, Airtel, Vodafone and Idea cellular, have so far successfully rolled out 4G service in 15, five and 10 circles, respectively.last_img read more

Tata after Brexit To leave or to stay in Britain

first_imgThe June 23 referendum that saw Britain leave the European Union (Brexit), has also left the Indian conglomerate Tatas with increased uncertainties, said the Nikkei Asian Review.With 19 companies in the UK and businesses ranging from tea, hotels, motels, motors, software, steel and others, the Tatas now seem to be in a fix from exiting any of it, said the review.In March, the Tatas had threatened to exit its ailing steel business in the UK if the government did not intervene to negotiate sale of business and help revive stressed plants. The much awaited last week of June, expected to crystalise talks with government, however was awash with Brexit referendum.As steel venture continues to clock losses amounting to $1.33 million a day, the Brexit verdict now stands to threaten Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) Automobile a 1 billion pound loss a year. JLR, another money-spinning Tata concern, is expected to take a hit from its export to other European nations.Tatas bonhomie with the British government, which runs back to the colonial days, may stand to gain with Brexit.Despite this, Nikkei noted that, the exit from the steel business or scaling down any other may not come easily as both UK-based steel and JLR collectively contribute nearly 30 percent to the total sales of Tata Group.This apart, the review emphasized that Tatas bonhomie with the British government, which run back to the colonial days, may stand to gain with Brexit. Like the British helped bootstrap many Tata companies in their nascent days, it might as well help again, it added.As UK strengthens its bonds with the commonwealth and many erstwhile colonies, beyond the boundaries set by European Union, the Tatas might again benefit.last_img read more

Imran H Sarker files writ challenging travelban

first_imgImran H Sarker. File PhotoGanajagaran Mancha spokesperson Imran H Sarker filed a writ petition with the High Court on Monday challenging the legality of government’s decision to obstruct him from travelling abroad, reports UNB.The writ sought the HC directives to allow him to travel abroad, said Imran H Sarker.The hearing on the writ petition is likely to be held at the bench of justice Tariq Ul Hakim and justice Md. Shohrawardi this afternoon.Members of law enforcement agencies prevented Sarker from travelling to the USA at the Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport on Friday, said a press release of Ganajagaran Mancha.The press release said that Imran was going to the USA following an invitation of the US state department.last_img read more

Analysis The Unfolding Story of The Newest Americans

first_imgBob Daemmrich for The Texas TribuneU.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks about carrying out President Donald Trump’s immigration priorities at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Texas in Austin on Friday, Oct. 20, 2017.Public policy is judged by how it works, not by how it was intended.As a deadline nears for reuniting immigrant families riven at the U.S.-Mexico border, even the stoutest defenders of tough U.S. immigration policy have to be smacking their foreheads at the outcomes of this fiasco.Back in April, the Trump administration, in the person of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, announced a tough crackdown on immigration, a “zero tolerance” policy at the country’s southern border intended to grind illegal immigration to a stop.“The situation at our Southwest Border is unacceptable,” he said at the time. “Congress has failed to pass effective legislation that serves the national interest — that closes dangerous loopholes and fully funds a wall along our southern border. As a result, a crisis has erupted at our Southwest Border that necessitates an escalated effort to prosecute those who choose to illegally cross our border.“To those who wish to challenge the Trump Administration’s commitment to public safety, national security, and the rule of law,” he continued, “I warn you: illegally entering this country will not be rewarded, but will instead be met with the full prosecutorial powers of the Department of Justice. To the Department’s prosecutors, I urge you: promoting and enforcing the rule of law is vital to protecting a nation, its borders, and its citizens. You play a critical part in fulfilling these goals, and I thank you for your continued efforts in seeing to it that our laws — and as a result, our nation — are respected.”He did make himself perfectly clear, didn’t he?And you see how it worked out. Tomorrow is a court-ordered deadline (bet you a dollar the government doesn’t finish in time) for reuniting the families that were split as a result of Sessions’ policy.Strict enforcement of immigration law was the intention. Busted families and kids in jail was the result. As it turns out, that result was legally unacceptable to the courts and politically unacceptable to President Donald Trump, who reversed the “zero tolerance” policy with an executive order.Unwinding this mess is slow, painful and would have been unnecessary if the feds had thought things through. If you prosecute immigrants under criminal law, you’re obliged to take away and to protect the children who are with them, just as you would in the arrest of a drunk driver. You’d have to have a system in place that kept track of which kids came in with which adults. You’d want to quickly vet the adults to flag those that maybe shouldn’t be reunited with those children. But in most cases, you wouldn’t want to deport someone before making sure they had their kids back. The planning should also include places for everyone to be fed, sheltered and clothed. Health and education services might be needed.A million things.And the feds obviously didn’t do the prep work before throwing this zero-tolerance machinery into gear.Whether you approve or disapprove of how things turned out, this is what we’re doing. Whether it was the intention or not, it’s how the policy actually works. It’s the result of our actions, and it doesn’t much matter what our intention was.That approve/disapprove part now becomes important: If the policy produces the desired result, you leave it alone. If it produces an undesirable result, you admit the mistake and fix it.Even many Republican base voters — women, to be specific— thought the separations went too far. That made a political reversal necessary. And the courts ordered the families reunited, the process now underway, when the policy was challenged on legal grounds.The numbers aren’t great, but the fix is underway. As of Monday evening, 879 of the remaining separated families had been reunited. Another 538 parents had been cleared — a step toward that many more reunions. But 217 adults were in the “maybe” category, and 917 had been declared “ineligible” for reunion or likely to be so. Half the adults in that last group are no longer in the United States.But the kids are. Think about that. This round began with 2,551 kids still unattached to the adults who were with them when they got to the United States. Let’s say for the purpose of discussion that 1,000 of these minors will remain in the United States when all is said and done. We’re obligated to take care of them, educate them, feed them, all of that. They’re the newest kind of “Dreamers” — kids brought to America by immigrants who entered the country illegally, allowed to chase the American dream in the only country they really know or, in the case of older kids, the only country where they’ve still got adult guardians.That’s how the policy so carefully laid out by the attorney general actually worked, whatever the administration’s intentions: a politically forceful presentation, an ill-considered policy, a disastrous legal and political fiasco, and about 1,000 new Americans, making their way in the land of the free and the home of the brave. Sharelast_img read more

Houston Will Spend 650000 To Boost 2020 Census Outreach

first_img X Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /00:49 Houston City Council approved on Wednesday a $650,000 contract with Lopez Negrete Communications to help the federal government get an accurate headcount in the 2020 census, but councilmembers were divided on whether to fund the effort to boost community outreach. Opponents like Councilmember Mike Knox were concerned the money would be used for partisan political work. “So we’re going to put these people out on the street to collect numbers and fill out the census,” Knox said. “And ‘oh while we’re there, let’s register you to vote.’” Councilmember Robert Gallegos dismissed those concerns. “It really frightens me to hear someone say ‘oh my God, they may register someone to vote,’” Gallegos said. “That’s frightening.”At last week’s meeting, some councilmembers said they shouldn’t spend the money in a tight budget year when they’re laying off firefighters to pay for Prop B salary increases. But Gallegos said Houston needs to invest in the census.“Due to the fact that we have a president that’s trying to undercount the Hispanic community in regards to placing a citizenship question, which is going to affect the city of Houston, I’m ashamed that you even tried to relate this to Prop B, to undercount the Hispanic community,” Gallegos said. The Supreme Court is expected to decide in the next few weeks whether the census will include the controversial question about immigration status.Others agreed with Gallegos for a different reason, saying the consultants would help get an accurate count of Houston residents who are still displaced from Harvey.The city could end up investing $1.5 million in census outreach initiatives if a second round of funding is approved. Billions of dollars in federal funding are at stake. Mayor Sylvester Turner said the city gets around $1,500 in federal funding for each person who is counted, and a 10% undercount of the population could cost the city $3.78 billion over the course of a decade. Last month, Turner wrote a letter to Gov. Greg Abbott asking for the state to contribute funding as well. “Past Texas Governors Clements and Bush issued executive orders to create State Complete Count Committees. These committees were tasked with promoting Census outreach,” Turner said. “I urge you to secure funding of $5 to $10 million for this important priority. It is a small price to pay to make sure all our residents are counted, and every dollar invested will come back to Texas many times over.” In 2020, the census forms will be available online, by phone or by mail. Six languages have been added. For the first time, people can respond in Arabic, French, Haitian Creole, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese and Tagalog.center_img Share Wikimedia CommonsHouston City Hall.last_img read more

Because we love you Mom

first_imgMother’s Day is the perfect occasion to show your mom how much you appreciate and value her. It is one such day when we get to say a ‘Big Thank You’ to our moms for all that they have done for us. It is a day when we want them to feel absolutely pampered and blessed. So this Mother’s Day, share priceless moments with your mum as The Imperial shower her with a delightful bouquet of offerings with special discounts and packages, celebrating 100 years of Mother’s Day across the  restaurants. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Let her indulge in a fabulous brunch buffet at 1911 while you feel satiated that you are at the right place to make her spoilt for choice. High fashion cup cakes with personalized messages, home grown soil free 100 % organic micro greens combined with a health station filled with a fine selection of healthy juices extracted live, leave you asking for more and promise to excite you to take your pick on a blazing hot day. The lavish buffet has much more to offer. Uniquely designed chocolate nests with dainty eggs notify the genesis of life and pay an ode to motherhood while accentuating emotions and leaving the mouth-watering flavors in your mouth. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe buffet would be thematically designed by our team of chefs with lots of candles for a feminine touch to celebrate the occasion and make all the mothers present, feel special. Chef’s special Amuse Busch offerings would be served complimentary to all guests at the buffet. So this is your time to give back to your mothers and make this day truly special and memorable for them. Enjoy this unique brunch with your mothers while we create lasting memories for you, one of it is the unusual souvenir from The Imperial – a specially designed Chocolate jewelry. The priceless memories get more enchanting with 20% discount on cakes and pastries at La Baguette, on High-Tea at the Atrium, on Diamond Magnetic Body Ritual – 90 mins (Spa Gift Voucher valid in SUFI room at The Imperial Salon for 1 month and not to be used in conjunctions with any other promotion), on Caviar Signature Hair Ritual – 90 mins, 20% discount off on Sufi products at The Imperial Spa and Salon and The Imperial Boutique.Where: The Imperial When: 11 May Timing: 12.30 – 3.30 pm Price: Rs 3200 + taxeslast_img read more

United States led air strikes hit Al Qaeda affiliate in Syria

first_imgThe Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a monitoring group, said the strikes were on an office and a vehicle in Idlib province in northwest Syria, where last week the group routed Western-backed Syrian rebels.Residents said one strike targeted a car used by Nusra commanders, near an internet cafe in the Nusra-controlled town of Sarmada close to the Turkish border.A rebel from another Western-backed group operating in northern Syria confirmed the air strikes on the Nusra Front and hardline Islamist group Ahrar al-Sham near the border with Turkey, and said they took place at around 1 a.m.‘The strength of strikes and their accuracy confirms that they were carried out by the alliance,’ the rebel said, speaking on condition of anonymity.The Nusra Front vehicle struck in the attack had been carrying ammunition, he said. In neighbouring Harem, residents said at least four children had been killed and dozens injured in an attack they believed was launched by the coalition.The Observatory also reported the first air strikes against Ahrar al-Sham.Residents around the rebel-held Bab al-Hawa border crossing, a strategic gateway to Turkey, said a missile flattened the group’s headquarters nearby and killed Abu al-Nasr, the head of its arms procurement division.Rami Abdulrahman, head of the Observatory, said it marked the second time the Nusra Front had been hit in the U.S.-led campaign. The first was on Sept. 23, the first day of U.S. air strikes in Syria, which are part of Washington’s strategy to ‘degrade and destroy’ Islamic State.Nusra, which has been trying with allies to remove its name from the U.N. terrorist list, was taken by surprise when coalition warplanes bombed several of its positions then. Several commanders are believed to have been killed in the September strikes, including Kuwaiti-born Mohsin al-Fadhli — also known as Abu Asmaa al-Jazrawi — reputedly a former member of Osama bin Laden’s inner circle.Nusra Front last week seized control of areas of Idlib province from Western-backed rebel leader Jamal Maarouf, head of the Syria Revolutionaries’ Front in northern Syria, confiscating its weapons.last_img read more

Swedish public broadcaster SVT has launched an ope

first_imgSwedish public broadcaster SVT has launched an open archive initiative to make its back-catalogue of programming available to the general public.The pubcaster says it ultimately aims to make over 10,000 hours of programming available via the oppetarkiv.se portal. Currently about 800 episodes of 200 different shows are available, and SVT has said it aims to add 50 new titles each month.The initiative will see a range of drama series, kids shows, entertainment programmes, documentaries and culture and sports events made available. The move follows changes to the law governing copyright and an agreement between SVT and the country’s rights organizations concerning the broadcaster’s self-produced programmes delivered before June 30 2005.The move is the latest in a series of digital initiatives by the Swedish broadcaster. In February, SVT made its complete line-up of five channels –  SVT1, SVT2, Barnkanalen, Kunskapskanalen and SVT24 – available on the web.last_img read more

CHIEF INSPECTOR MARK MCCLARENCEdrumahoeLETTERSHAND

first_img CHIEF INSPECTOR MARK MCCLARENCEdrumahoeLETTERSHANDONEY AVENUEPOLICE URGE PUBLIC VIGILANCE AFTER NOTHING FOUND IN DERRY SEARCHES POLICE in Foyle investigating a report of suspicious activity have carried out a number of searches in but nothing has been found.The searches were carried out in the Lettershandoney Avenue area of DrumahoeChief Inspector Mark McClarence said:  “I would like to thank local residents for their patience during the policing operation today. ShareTweetcenter_img “The safety of the public is our first priority and searches were carried out following a report received by police in order to keep people safe.“Whilst nothing suspicious was found, I would continue to ask residents to remain vigilant and to report anything untoward to police on 101.”POLICE URGE PUBLIC VIGILANCE AFTER NOTHING FOUND IN DERRY SEARCHES was last modified: January 22nd, 2017 by John2John2 Tags:last_img read more

I think Im coming down with somethingUsually tha

first_imgI think I’m coming down with something.Usually that means I prepare a mug of tea, add a spoonful of honey kept solely for such occasions, and add a dash of lemon juice. This elixir, I’ve been told, will soothe my sore throat and coax my raspy voice back to normalcy. But does it actually work?”I have to say, when I have patients that are sick, I often ask them to sip hot tea,” says Dr. Edward Damrose, chief of laryngology at Stanford Health Care. “But I’m not sure that it’s the tea itself that has the beneficial property, or that the warm water cuts through the phlegm and makes patients feel good.”To figure out whether the classic tea drink alleviates a sore throat, it helps to know what causes a sore throat in the first place. As Damrose explains, the throat is divided into two parts: a pharynx and a larynx, and both can be infected at the same time or separately. We use our pharynx when we swallow food or liquid. Bacterial or viral infections can cause the pharynx to swell and lead to a sore throat.When we speak, on the other hand, we use our larynx, the part of the throat that contains our vocal cords. Viral infections make it more difficult for the vocal cords to vibrate, causing us to lose our voices.How exactly this happens is something of a mystery. “We have a lot of ideas but not a definite answer,” says Dr. Jennifer Long, assistant professor of head and neck surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. One theory suggests that white blood cells storm the vocal cords, causing them to swell and preventing vibration. Another theory is that viruses injure the surface of the vocal cords, making it difficult to vibrate. “For being a common problem, it’s surprising how little we know,” Long says.On top of this uncertainty, there’s not a lot of good research on whether tea or honey can help a sore throat or lost voice, according to Dr. Maya Sardesai, an associate professor of otolaryngology and surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine. High-quality health studies typically use placebos, but that’s difficult in this case, Sardesai explains. Most people can tell whether they’re drinking tea and honey, so creating placebos for study participants is challenging.These difficulties aside, all three doctors are willing to speculate about whether tea, honey and lemon help a sore throat and voice loss.Let’s start with tea. Because liquids and food go down our pharynx, not our larynx, Damrose points out that any beverage is unlikely to have a direct effect on our vocal cords. But tea could still help a sore throat that results from a swelled pharynx. Research has shown green tea has anti-inflammatory properties, which could help decrease a sore throat’s swelling. Perhaps more importantly, according to Damrose, when people drink a liquid like tea, the act of sipping and swallowing prevents irritating coughing. Warm liquid can also help remove throat phlegm. Long and Sardesai recommend teas with low caffeine, because caffeine may lead to greater acid production and irritate the throat further.As for honey, “it’s really very speculative” whether honey helps throat pain, according to Long. Honey might be a natural anti-coughing agent, but so far research is inconclusive. On the other hand, none of the doctors suggest that honey might harm the throat.That’s not the case for lemon. “I actually worry about too much lemon because it’s so acidic, and acids can be irritating” to the throat, says Long. Sardesai agrees, though she notes that “lemon does have vitamin C, and vitamin C is thought to be helpful early in some infections.” Damrose notes another plus: Lemon has antibacterial properties, which could fight off bacterial sore throat.The tea-honey-lemon trifecta has a mixed report card. For more tested treatments, the doctors recommend resting, inhaling steam and — in the case of voice loss — speaking as little as possible (yes, that includes cutting back on whispering). Symptoms should subside within two weeks, and if not, a trip to the doctor is warranted.I’ll do my best to follow the doctors’ advice. Just as soon as I finish my cup of tea.Natalie Jacewicz is a science writer based in New York City. You can find more of her work here. Gnawing Questions is a semi-regular column answering the food mysteries puzzling us and our readers. Got a question you want us to explore? Let us know via our contact form. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

The prime minister has become the third senior Con

first_imgThe prime minister has become the third senior Conservative figure in a week to refuse to say in front of television cameras whether his party plans to tax key disability benefits after the general election.David Cameron was asked by SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon in last night’s (2 April) leaders’ debate on ITV how his party planned to find the £12 billion-a-year in welfare cuts announced by the chancellor in last month’s budget.Cameron refused to say where those cuts would come from and whether they would include taxing disability benefits.Last week, the BBC reported that it had seen leaked documents that suggested the Conservatives were considering taxing disability benefits as one way to cut the social security bill by £12 billion a year by 2017-18.Among the options, drawn up by civil servants in the Department for Work and Pensions, were an introduction of means-testing for the contributory form of employment and support allowance (saving a possible £1.3 billion a year), taxing disability living allowance (DLA), personal independence payment (PIP) and attendance allowance (possibly saving £1.5 billion a year), and restricting eligibility to carer’s allowance (saving £1 billion a year).George Osborne, the chancellor, refused to promise that there would no further cuts to disability benefits, when interviewed by Channel 4 News, but would only say that the party would “protect the most vulnerable”.And Iain Duncan Smith, the work and pensions secretary, said on BBC’s The Andrew Marr Show that the party might not provide any details before the election of how they would find most of the £12 billion in cuts, because “no decisions have been made”.But Duncan Smith added: “What throughout I’ve always said is I didn’t come into this job after years looking at this to just make cheese paring cuts.“What we’ve come in to do is to reform the welfare system, so that we don’t waste money on organisations and groups and things that don’t actually help life change.”So many people tried to sign an open letter on the Disabled People Against Cuts website – calling on Duncan Smith to “come clean about cuts affecting disabled people” – that the site crashed.And Richard Exell, a disabled senior policy officer at the TUC, said in a column that taxing DLA and PIP would be “particularly felt by low-paid disabled workers”.He also said that the government’s own figures suggested that more than 600,000 disabled people “could find it more difficult to keep their jobs or to move into employment if their DLA or PIP became liable for tax, reducing their ability to pay for services that remove barriers to employment”.Disability Rights UK (DR UK) said that it was “really concerned about the BBC’s report that officials have developed options for politicians to make spending cuts that would again unfairly hit disabled people and carers”.A DR UK spokesperson said: “DLA/PIP is not an out-of-work benefit; but it could become one, because if it is taxed it will certainly act as an incentive not to work.“It makes no sense to tax DLA/PIP since the purpose of the benefit is to help cover the extra costs of disability – things like getting around, and getting support – and so create more of a level playing-field between disabled people and other citizens.”The DR UK spokesperson added: “Furthermore, many disabled people already pay most, if not all, of their DLA/PIP over to local authorities if they get social care support – what we might call the ‘care tax’.  In effect, what this proposal would do would be to tax a tax.”A letter, published this week by the Guardian, and signed by leading disabled campaigners and organisations, including members of the WOWcampaign, Black Triangle, Disabled People Against Cuts, Pat’s Petition and People First England, called for the next government to carry out a proper assessment of the “human cost” of the cuts already made by the coalition before even contemplating any further cuts.The letter said: “The news of some leaked documents, explaining further horrendous cuts to carers and sick and disabled people, have left them terrified of what is going to happen.“We would have thought it imperative that any government respecting human rights would check the consequences of the cuts disabled people and carers have already endured, before imposing further draconian cuts.”Of the seven party leaders who took part in the ITV debate, only two were willing to mention the issue of disability poverty.Natalie Bennett, leader of the Greens, said that two-thirds of the households affected by the bedroom tax included at least one disabled person, and she pointed to the imminent closure of the Independent Living Fund, whose users were having their support “slashed away”.Bennett said: “We have to be a human, fair, decent society. We have to support the most vulnerable.”Sturgeon also raised the issue of cuts to welfare, when she asked Cameron: “You’re proposing an additional £12 billion in welfare cuts. Where are those cuts going to fall? Who’s going to pay the price of those cuts?”She added: “Let’s explain what that means: one million people on disability benefit across the UK are going to lose £1,100 of their benefit. That’s not the kind of economic plan I want.”Cameron said: “In the last parliament we found £21 billion of savings in welfare because everybody knows that welfare was overblown and needed to be properly dealt with.“What is the alternative to making cuts in welfare? Putting up taxes and working people’s pay. I don’t want to see that happen.”last_img read more

A mental health charity has been heavily criticise

first_imgA mental health charity has been heavily criticised for its decision to announce a partnership with a controversial US insurance giant that has made significant financial gains from government incapacity benefit reforms that it influenced through its lobbying.The Mental Health Foundation (MHF) said the new partnership with Unum would see the two organisations work together to tackle the stigma of mental health in the workplace and encourage employers to safeguard the mental health of their employees.But disabled activists who learned of the partnership this week are horrified that a mental health charity would join forces with an organisation that has made money from the controversial programme to reform incapacity benefits and has bragged about steering government policy on those reforms.They point out that many thousands of people with mental distress have either died or had their health further damaged by the reforms.Mo Stewart, the disabled activist who has led efforts in the UK to raise concerns about Unum’s influence, has written to a trustee of the charity to alert him to the company’s background.She told Disability News Service (DNS) she had “spent the past six years researching the links between this American insurance corporate giant with the British government*, their funding of a research centre to produce policy-based research that was used to justify the introduction of the fatally flawed WCA, and the fact that they were identified as the second worst healthcare insurance company in America”.She said: “It remains cause for serious concern that this American corporate giant continues to infiltrate the agencies concerned with the welfare of our most vulnerable people.”Professor Peter Beresford, co-chair of the user-led, grassroots network Shaping Our Lives, also raised concerns about the partnership.He said: “Organisations like MHF (and Mind and Rethink etc) hog the resources, the credibility and still largely sign up to a traditional psychiatric/medical model which isn’t really working and isn’t really helpful.“For this sort of thing to be lurking as well means – well – what friends and allies have we really got, if such liaisons are underpinning organisations claiming to speak for us?”Unum was once described by a senior US law official as an “outlaw company” and it has been repeatedly exposed in the US courts for its refusal to pay out on large numbers of genuine insurance claims by disabled people.In 2011, Unum launched a major marketing campaign to promote the need for its income protection insurance (IPI) policies, just as the coalition began its three-year programme to reassess about 1.5 million existing claimants of old-style incapacity benefit through the work capability assessment (WCA).Disabled activists insist that the hated WCA is simply a public sector version of the tests used by companies like Unum to justify turning down valid IPI claims, and that by making the process of applying for the out-of-work disability benefit employment and support allowance (ESA) harsh and stressful, it has made IPI look more attractive.Three years ago, DNS revealed the existence of a Unum document from 2005 which bragged that government policy on disability assessment and management was “moving in the same direction” as Unum’s own views, and was “to a large extent being driven by our thinking and that of our close associates”.In 2002 – six years before the Labour government launched the WCA and the new ESA – Unum submitted a detailed memo to the Commons work and pensions committee.In the memo, Unum called for fundamental reform of the welfare system, and said the government “must ensure both that work always pays more than benefits, and more importantly that it is clearly seen to do so”, while laying out proposals with a strong resemblance to the ESA/WCA reforms that would be introduced several years later.The Unum memo suggested retaining a form of IB for those “genuinely incapable of undertaking any work whatsoever”, as Labour did with the ESA support group.It stressed in the memo that the company – then known as UnumProvident – was “confident that its policies and approach to [IPI] claim management and rehabilitation can be replicated more widely for those on IB” and that it would “particularly welcome the opportunity to put them into practice”.Despite this memo, and other evidence, John Letizia, head of public affairs for Unum UK, said in a statement: “Unum does not and never has lobbied on the topic of welfare reform or related matters.”He said: “As with many other businesses, Unum partners with various organisations on issues of mutual interest.“Our research in this case aims to tackle the stigma of mental health in the workplace in partnership with the Mental Health Foundation, a fantastic charity with who we wish to help reach and educate businesses on this important issue.”The Mental Health Foundation refused to respond to the particular criticisms of Unum, but a spokesman said: “As a UK mental health charity that seeks to reach the broadest possible audience, we are always looking for ways to amplify our message and to develop new evidence to ensure everyone is able to enjoy good mental health.“That includes entering into partnerships with companies to help increase our reach and our capacity to undertake new research.“These are sometimes difficult judgements to make and we are guided by an assessment of whether the output of a partnership will break new ground and positively benefit people’s lives.“To that end, we took a decision, which we stand by, to work with Unum on an important project which we are confident will uncover fresh insights on how employers can build a more supportive environment for people experiencing mental distress into their everyday business activity.”He added: “On the issue of welfare reform, like many charities we have raised concerns about the disproportionate effect on mental health that some welfare reform measures have had.“We remain concerned, and as an organisation that speaks truth to power, we continue to raise questions and promote debate through our policy, research and campaigning activities.“We will not hesitate to raise any concerns directly with Unum, if needed, and have found them open to constructive dialogue.”*Her book, Cash Not Care – The Planned Demolition Of The UK Welfare State, will be published later this year by New Generation Publishinglast_img read more

The Department for Work and Pensions has refused t

first_imgThe Department for Work and Pensions has refused to name the charities and other organisations being paid millions of pounds to help deliver its new disability employment programme across England and Wales.All six of the new Work and Health Programme contracts went “live” last week, and DWP announced the main contractors in October.But it has refused to say which smaller organisations are helping to deliver the programme as sub-contractors.DWP’s reluctance to do so is likely to be linked to criticism that has been aimed at disability charities that were set to play a significant role in the new programme.When Disability News Service contacted seven of the largest disability charities – most of which are not user-led – in December 2016, none of them ruled out seeking Work and Health Programme contracts.But disabled activists have raised concerns that winning such contracts could mean that these and other charities would be unwilling to criticise the government on social security reform.All seven of the charities contacted in December 2016 insisted then that any contracts they won from the government would have no impact on their campaigning work.There are also major concerns about the programme itself, which is part of the government’s much-criticised Improving Lives work, health and disability strategy, with its “cruel and disastrous” emphasis on “work as a cure”, the placement of employment advisers in health services, and the continued use of benefit sanctions to “punish” disabled claimants.Disability News Service submitted a freedom of information request last month in a bid to discover which voluntary and private sector organisations would be helping to deliver the Work and Health Programme (WHP).But when DWP responded to the request earlier this month, it said the subcontracting organisations were still “subject to change”, but that it would “seek to publish a list of the confirmed main sub-contractors supporting the WHP” following “go live of all WHP contracts” in the week beginning 15 January.That date passed last week, but no list has yet been published.When DNS asked why it had not been released, a DWP spokeswoman said the department “will seek to publish a list of the sub-contractors in due course”.She refused to comment further.Linda Burnip, co-founder of Disabled People Against Cuts, said: “It is no surprise that DWP are unwilling to release details of firms involved in colluding to exploit disabled people for their own profits and this simply confirms the underhand way DWP run their programmes and their diabolical practices. “We look forward, together with Boycott Workfare, to finding out which organisations will be involved in implementing the new disability employment programme.”Denise McKenna, co-founder of the Mental Health Resistance Network, said: “No one who is on the side of disabled people is celebrating the delivery of the Health and Work Programme, as it will wreck lives.“Perhaps the successful bidders will choose to celebrate their wins in private, because they know these contracts are shameful.“Disabled activists have called out charities on their close links with the DWP and their failure to remain independent of Tory ideology.“The private firms who take on these contracts, along with the charities, will be closely watched by activists.“Their identities can’t be protected by the DWP forever.“We are used to the DWP being secretive. After all, they have so much to hide.”The main WHP contractors are Remploy (in Wales); the charity Shaw Trust in central England and the home counties; Reed In Partnership in north-east England; Ingeus in the north-west; and Pluss in the south of England.Remploy, formerly owned by the government, is now mostly controlled by the US company Maximus.Maximus has a disturbing track record of discrimination, incompetence and fraud in the US, while Remploy slashed the pay of service-users who were taking part in inspections of health and care facilities, after taking on three Care Quality Commission contracts, and has since been heavily criticised for its performance in delivering those contracts.last_img read more

The number of staff working in the governments Of

first_imgThe number of staff working in the government’s Office for Disability Issues (ODI) has plummeted by more than two-thirds under the coalition and Conservative governments, new figures released under the Freedom of Information Act have revealed.In March 2010, just before the Tory-led coalition came to power, there were the equivalent of 48 full-time staff working in ODI.By March 2012 that had fallen to 29 full-time equivalent staff.Although there are no figures for 2013, 2014 and 2015, by 1 January 2016 there were just 20 full-time equivalent staff working at ODI.DWP insists that part of the reason for the fall is that “elements of the work that was carried out by ODI is now being taken forward by specialist units across government”, such as the Work and Health Unit (WHU), jointly set up with the Department of Health in 2015.But following the launch of WHU, the numbers continued to fall, to 13.65 in January 2017 and just 11.5 in January this year, although they rose again slightly to 15.45 by May this year.The numbers were released to Disability News Service by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) in response to a freedom of information request.Meanwhile, the ODI website has not been updated in more than six months.In all of 2017, the website was updated just three times, compared with five updates in 2016, and 17 in 2015.Only last month, DWP admitted that none of the bodies it set up to engage with disabled people and their organisations as part of its disability strategy had met in nearly a year.And earlier this month, DWP refused to say whether it still followed the Fulfilling Potential strategy, which was supposed to describe the government’s commitment to “a society where disabled people can realise their aspirations and fulfil their potential”.A DWP spokeswoman said: “ODI remains the focal point for cross-government disability issues, working on a range of issues to empower disabled people and enable them to participate fully in society, but their team is [by] no means the only people working on disability issues.“ODI has an oversight role to provide advice and facilitate engagement, as departments focus upon disability as part of their policy.”She also pointed to this week’s announcement by Sarah Newton, the minister for disabled people, of a new “interdepartmental ministerial group on disability and society”, which “will include ministers from a wide range of departments to oversee and drive forward the work of government in tackling the barriers faced by disabled people and to ensure their voice is heard in policy development and legislation”.No further details of how the group will operate and who will be involved have yet been released.But there was confusion following the announcement because the coalition had previously announced it was setting up an “inter-departmental ministerial group on disability” in February 2014.Successive governments have failed to explain what happened to that group, and why it appears to have been scrapped at some point in the last four years.But the DWP spokeswoman said: “The IMG in 2014 was set up and run under a previous parliament.“It is normal practice for different governments to set up new structures and protocols.”She had not confirmed by 9am today (Thursday) when the previous IMG was scrapped.The DWP spokeswoman added: “This government is determined to build an inclusive society that enables everyone to realise their full potential and as such remains committed to ODI facilitating the work across government for disability issues.”DWP’s admission of the cuts to ODI staff since 2010 will cast further doubt on the government’s commitment to disability rights and equality, and its pledge in 2013 to make the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) “a living reality for disabled people in Britain”.Last August, the UN’s committee on the rights of persons with disabilities told a UK government delegation – led by ODI – that its cuts to social security and other support for disabled people had caused “a human catastrophe”, which was “totally neglecting the vulnerable situation people with disabilities find themselves in”.The committee later told the UK government to make more than 80 improvements to the ways its laws and policies affect disabled people’s human rights.In its “concluding observations” on the progress the UK has made in implementing UNCRPD, the committee raised concerns and made recommendations on all but three of the 33 treaty articles it could have breached.It was, said the committee, the highest number of recommendations it had ever produced for a country undergoing the review process.last_img read more

A disabled benefit claimant with high support need

first_imgA disabled benefit claimant with high support needs who has lost more than £40 a week after having to transfer onto the new universal credit – forcing him into even greater poverty – has challenged the government to defend its drastic cuts and reforms.Mark Golden, from Yorkshire, estimates that he paid more than £100,000 in income tax and national insurance during his working life before he was forced to leave his job by a serious injury at work.Now the wheelchair-user is having to confront the reality of the impact of the introduction of universal credit on disabled people, after being forced off employment and support allowance (ESA) and onto the new system.The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has repeatedly refused to provide details of exactly how universal credit will affect disabled people in different situations financially, insisting instead that more than a million disabled people will be better off by £100 a month under universal credit.But Golden’s case appears to demonstrate how many disabled people with high support needs will be forced into even deeper poverty by universal credit.On 1 December, Golden – who has both physical and mental health impairments – had to move from Bradford to Bridlington so he could be nearer his family, because of his deteriorating health.Because of his change of circumstances, he was told that he would have to move from the ESA support group – and associated disability premiums – onto the much-criticised universal credit.He was shocked to be told that he would receive only £149 a week in living costs benefits on universal credit, compared with £191 a week on ESA, severe disability premium (SDP) and enhanced disability premium (EDP).Out of that £149, he must also contribute £17 a week towards his housing costs.Out of the remaining £132, he must also pay child support (£10 a week), credit card repayments (£20, after having to replace his fridge-freezer and washing-machine), contents insurance (£2 a week), about £6 a week on his mobile phone (he has no landline or broadband), TV licence (£3 a week), gas and electricity (£27 or £28 a week), and £10 a week he budgets for clothing and footwear (he gets through five or six pairs of trainers a year because he drags his left foot).He already has to restrict his use of central heating, only turning it on when the temperature in his flat falls below ten degrees, even though he has Raynaud’s disease, which affects extremities such as the fingers and toes in cold temperatures.This leaves about £50 a week for food and other essentials like toiletries and cleaning products, but that is without the £20 a week he budgets for MOT and car repairs, the £20 a week he previously spent on petrol, which he can no longer afford, and council tax of more than £20 a week he has been asked to pay, which he is hoping the council will reduce.He has been left with a choice of spending his little remaining weekly income on food, heat or transportation. He is likely to have to sell his car, leaving him even more isolated than he is already.He will eventually receive some compensation for the loss of SDP – likely to be less than £20 a week extra, backdated to when he moved onto universal credit – once regulations laid before parliament this week are voted on by MPs.He also receives personal independence payment of £145 a month to cover some of his disability-related extra costs, but he uses this to pay for personal care, provide the support he needs for visits to shops and other busy locations, and to pay for taxis when he is too ill to drive.In a letter to his MP, the Conservative Sir Greg Knight, Golden described both how inaccessible he had found the universal credit process and the impact on his income, writing: “As a constituent of Bridlington I would like to inform its MP of what is happening in his constituency. And how Universal Credits is so unfit for purpose.“The whole process has left my health even worse and I can totally understand why people are actually taking their own lives due to the process and awards of Universal Credits.”He told Disability News Service that he wanted the government to explain how it could justify the “dread and high stress levels” caused by the introduction of universal credit, which was leaving him and others with less money and “causing even more hardship and very difficult decisions on what areas you can cut back on in an already frugal lifestyle”.He said this was “pushing people into even more poverty and hardship” and having a “massive” impact on both their physical and mental health.He said: “Over the past few years, disabled people of this country have been made to jump through the government’s hoops to receive what they are entitled to, in many cases going through not only the benefit allocation but also the appeals processes.“At times, it makes one feel like you are having to grovel for what you’re entitled to.”A DWP spokesperson said: “People can access support online, via our helpline or in the jobcentre and Mr Golden regularly uses his online journal to communicate with the DWP.“In some circumstances, home visits can also be arranged to support a claimant with their claim.“Where a claimant is unable to make or maintain their claim online, they are able to do so using the claims by phone process.”She said the government was “committed to supporting people with disabilities and health conditions.“The SDP is not part of universal credit because we have simplified disability provision within universal credit.“This change ensures that around one million disabled people will receive more in universal credit than the legacy benefits system.”Despite this, a report by the Commons work and pensions committee suggested last month that even claimants with higher support needs would be worse off under universal credit because of the loss of SDP and EDP, saying that universal credit “does not match what those claimants could have received under the legacy system, with the premia in place”.DWP continues to refuse to say if it accepts this statement is correct.Only last week, the minister for disabled people, Sarah Newton, told her Labour shadow, Marsha de Cordova, that it would be too expensive to find out how many disabled people claiming SDP had been moved onto universal credit since June last year – and in the previous 18 months – in circumstances like Golden’s.Golden will be one of the last recipients of SDP to be moved on to universal credit, at least for several months, as new regulations came into force yesterday (Wednesday) that prevent any further migration of such claimants – apart from those involved in a small pilot programme – until the main “managed migration” process begins next year.Ministers laid this and another set of regulations before parliament on Monday (14 January), following a statement made by employment minister Alok Sharma on 11 January.The other set of regulations – which will have to be approved by MPs – will allow the government to run the small pilot, which will involve a maximum of 10,000 claimants of legacy benefits, including ESA, moving onto universal credit, which will begin in July.The regulations will also provide transitional protection for former recipients of SDP like Golden who have already moved across to universal credit, and those who will do so in the future.But even when these protections are introduced, ministers have previously suggested there will be compensation of only about £80 a month, compared with potential losses for Golden of more than £180 a month.The government will report on findings from the pilot before introducing legislation that will allow it to extend the “managed migration” to a further three million people on legacy benefits, including hundreds of thousands on ESA.The DWP spokesperson said: “The department will be providing a transitional payment to those who have already moved to universal credit who had SDP before they moved and who are eligible. This will be a lump sum and ongoing payments. “The transitional payments are within the main managed migration regulation package, laid today (Monday), which will be debated prior to the pilot, when parliamentary time allows.“Both the lump sum payment and the ongoing payments will commence after the managed migration regulations are passed.”She added: “The aim of the pilot is to ensure that claimants on all legacy benefits, with a range of differing characteristics, are successfully migrated to universal credit.“The department is currently working closely with a wide and diverse range of stakeholders to design the managed migration process and we are considering our approach to the pilot.” A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

Apple Presents a Pretty Good Take on Shark Tank With Its First

first_img Entrepreneur Staff Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. –shares Next Article Enroll Now for $5 Stephen J. Bronner Add to Queue News Director June 8, 2017center_img Apple Presents a Pretty Good Take on ‘Shark Tank’ With Its First Foray Into TV Image credit: Planet of the Apps 3 min read Apple debuted its first TV series, Planet of the Apps, on Tuesday, and guess what? The first episode was actually good!In the show, entrepreneurs pitch the apps they’ve built to a panel of judges made up of Gary Vaynerchuk, Honest co-founder Jessica Alba, Goop founder Gwyneth Paltrow and will.i.am, who is involved with a few tech companies.Related: All the Updates From Apple WWDC 2017The first half of the pilot follows the Shark Tank format: The contestants introduce themselves and their apps to the panel. The difference here is they have 60 seconds to do so in an “escalator pitch” — in which they literally ride down an escalator. The judges then use iPads to vote on whether they’d like to learn more about each given app. If at least one judge does, the contestant presents further. If one of the judges is still interested after this second round, the entrepreneur can choose which leader they’d like to have as a mentor.For me, the nice thing about watching Planet of the Apps was that the judges’ feedback always aligned with my thoughts. Only three concepts made it to the next round — one failed in the second round — while the judges swiftly passed over most of the others. And I didn’t question those decisions.During the second half of the show, the entrepreneurs behind the two apps that were chosen, Pair and Companion, discussed next steps with their partners, Alba and Vaynerchuk, respectively. The advice was stock for any frequent readers of Entrepreneur — know what the value of your product is, look at it from all angles, understand what makes it different from the competition — but the judges delivered it intelligently and entertainingly. If this show proves anything, it’s that Alba has serious business chops.In the final segment of the show, the entrepreneurs pitch a panel of venture capitalists from Lightspeed Venture Partners with their mentors at their side.Related: Why Apple’s Video That Imagines a World Without Apps Makes Me SadBecause the first episode is free, I definitely recommend giving it a watch if the concept strikes your fancy. But in terms of its mass appeal, I have my doubts. As opposed to Shark Tank, which features pitches for general consumer goods, Planet of the Apps strictly focuses on programs that run on mobile devices. I suspect most people just don’t care about apps outside of the most popular ones we all use consistently.I also have my doubts about the show’s potential reach because of its limited distribution. Since it’s an Apple-produced series, it’s only available via iTunes, and you have to pay to watch. This limits its potential audience severely.We’ll just have to wait and see if Planet of the Apps can escape these limitations. ‘Planet of the Apps’ is the latest take on the pitch show, but its appeal may be limited. Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Applelast_img read more