Conservatives halt allnight voting marathon vow to resume fight next week

first_imgOTTAWA – The Conservatives vowed Friday to employ new tactics next week to force testimony from Justin Trudeau’s national security adviser over the prime minister’s recent trip to India.The Tories made the pledge after ending a marathon overnight voting session that began Thursday and kept members of Parliament answering roll calls in the House of Commons for nearly 21 hours.Conservative House leader Candice Bergen called a halt to the procedural stunt after MPs had voted on hundreds of motions deemed confidence measures. After she did, the calendar on the clerk’s desk finally flipped over to Friday and the sitting wrapped up.Bergen thanked parliamentary staff, from the Speaker to security guards to cafeteria workers, for hanging on through the prolonged sitting.Soon afterwards, the bleary MPs — some clad in sweats and clutching pillows and blankets — emerged from the chamber pumping their fists in the air in a victory gesture.At issue was the Liberal government’s refusal to support a Conservative demand that national security adviser Daniel Jean be called to testify before a Commons committee about a briefing he gave journalists during the prime minister’s ill-starred visit to India.Jean suggested to reporters covering Trudeau’s trip last month that rogue factions in the Indian government had sabotaged the visit. Since then, Opposition MPs demanded that Jean explain his reasoning about how one-time Canadian Sikh separatist and convicted attempted murderer Jaspal Atwal was invited to a Trudeau event in India.Atwal’s appearance, and Jean’s statements about the Indian government, have harmed Canada-India relations, said Conservative foreign affairs critic Erin O’Toole.“We’ve already seen the Indian government express outrage, raise tariffs,” said O’Toole.“We’ve angered a major Commonwealth partner … and the prime minister clings to this conspiracy theory that directly contradicts his own MP, Randeep Sarai.”While Trudeau has defended Jean as a professional, non-partisan, veteran public servant who only says what he knows to be true, Sarai took responsibility for getting Atwal on the guest lists for Trudeau events in India after Atwal said he requested an invitation.Only one of those two scenarios can be true, said O’Toole: either Atwal was invited by a Liberal MP or he was an Indian government plant and Jean should be allowed to testify so he can clear the air over the controversy.But Liberal House Leader Bardish Chagger said it was entirely up to MPs on the national security committee — the majority of whom are Liberals — to decide whether Jean should be called to testify.“The committee should be able to choose if they would like him to come and testify or not,” said Chagger. “And that’s a choice for committee members to make.”NDP members, however, noted that the committee had not voted on a motion to compel Jean to testify. Instead, committee members adjourned debate before a vote could be called.Either way, it’s up to Trudeau to “come clean with Canadians about his trip to India,” Bergen said in a statement.“Canadians deserve to know the truth about what happened during the Atwal Affair,” she said. “Justin Trudeau is trying to hide the one person who can set the record straight. That’s not right.”O’Toole insisted the fight will carry on next week, although he wouldn’t say what new tactics his party might use.“We’re going to bring this back in a new way,” said O’Toole.last_img read more

Parole hearing for Calgary man who strangled wife buried body in basement

first_imgBOWDEN, Alta. — A man who strangled his wife and concealed her body in a wall of their home after enduring what he described as years of domestic abuse is scheduled for his first parole hearing today.Allan Shyback was convicted of manslaughter and indignity to a body in the 2012 death of Lisa Mitchell.He was originally sentenced to seven years in prison, but the Alberta Court of Appeal increased it to 10 years.Shyback testified at his trial that he killed Mitchell in defence as she attacked him with a knife.He said he panicked, put her body inside a plastic bin and cemented it into a basement wall of the Calgary home they shared with their children.Last fall, the Appeal Court, in adding more time to his sentence, noted the severity of Shyback’s crimes“For two years, the respondent led the deceased’s family to believe that she was alive and there was some hope of her returning. He maintained this deception until the Mr. Big operation revealed the truth,” Justice Jack Watson wrote on behalf of the three-member panel.“It was particularly cruel for the respondent to suggest to the children that their mother had abandoned them but might return one day, even though he knew she was entombed in the basement of the house in which they were all living.”An undercover police operation began in 2013 and ended with Shyback’s confession and arrest in Winnipeg.The parole hearing at Bowden Institution, south of Red Deer, Alta., will assess any risk he may present to the community if he is released. In most cases, board members give their decision and reasons the day of the hearing.— Follow @BillGraveland on Twitter Bill Graveland, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Toronto stock index ends down despite commodity gains US markets mixed

first_imgCanada’s main stock index gave up early gains to close lower Tuesday, while U.S. stocks were mixed and the loonie remained flat.The Toronto Stock Exchange ended lower despite strong gains in commodities, which showed strength after copper rose from a price floor, said Dominique Barker, Portfolio Manager, CIBC Asset Management.“One thing that has been consistent all day has been commodities, so we’ve had commodity prices up off the bottom, particularly copper.”The September copper contract closed up six cents at US$2.81 a pound. Efforts by the Chinese government to spur economic activity is probably a key contributor to the rise, said Barker.“I think that’s driven by some news out of China yesterday with their announcement to reduce taxes and increase infrastructure spending. So we’re seeing a read-through on to the energy stocks, equities in Canada, as well as copper stocks in Canada.”The S&P/TSX global base metals index was up 3.62 per cent as big copper names like Souther Copper, Lundin Mining, First Quantum Minerals all saw substantial gains.Overall, the Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index closed down 30.71 points at 16,390.13 as losses in health, industrials and consumer staples weighed on the market.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average closed up 197.65 points at 25,241.94. The S&P 500 index closed up 13.42 points at 2,820.40 and the Nasdaq composite index was down 1.11 points at 7,840.77.Gains in some U.S. markets came as many big-name companies showed strong earnings, said Barker.“Some of the reports that came out today were very supportive of a strong economy. There were beats and raises by Eli Lilly, Lockheed Martin, 3M, Google and Verizon. All announced earnings that beat expectations.”The Canadian dollar averaged 76.01 cents US, unchanged from Monday.The September crude contract closed up 63 cents at US$68.52 per barrel and the September natural gas contract was up two cents at US$2.72 per mmBTU. The August gold contract ended down 10 cents at US$1,225.50 an ounce.Canadian National Railway Co. announced after market close that it had increased its earnings outlook and capital program for the year, following a quarter that saw its net income increase 27 per cent in the last quarter compared with last year.The railway closed down 61 cents or 0.54 per cent at $112 after the company said earlier in the day that it had made interim CEO Jean-Jacques Ruest its permanent chief executive.last_img read more

Wildfire Service downgrades status of three wildfires in Northeast BC

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The BC Wildfire Service has downgraded the status of three wildfires burning in Northeast B.C.Fire Information Officer Amanda Reynolds says that while the activity of the Tommy Lake Fire remains intense, fire activity on three other large fires has diminished to the point where the Service no longer considers them wildfires of note. According to Reynolds, the wildfire burning southeast of the Muskwa River near Fort Nelson has not experienced much fire activity in the past week. That fire currently sits at 4,793 hectares, and is not currently threatening any properties since it is located roughly 80 kilometres southwest of Fort Nelson. However, Reynolds said that crews may be looking at a modified response to that fire if it starts to see more fire activity. Closer to Fort St. John, both the Milligan Hills and Kahta Creek Fires have also been downgraded from wildfires of note. The Kahta Creek Fire, which has burned roughly 1,700 hectares near Buckinghorse River, has seen dramatically reduced fire activity over the weekend, especially after the fire saw 10 mm of rain fall late last week. There are currently 55 firefighters and 3 helicopters battling that fire, and Reynolds said that firefighters have been patrolling the fire’s perimeter to ensure that it doesn’t scorch a larger area. The fire is currently being held, meaning it does not appear to be spreading.Fire crews have also increased containment on the Milligan Hills Fire, which is 700 hectares in area. The 60 firefighters, 2 helicopters, and 3 pieces of heavy machinery have managed to build a fire guard and contain 35 percent of the fire, which is 10 kilometres from Milligan Hills Provincial Park. Reynolds said that the fire’s status has also been updated to “Being Held” which indicates that sufficient suppression action has been taken that the fire is not likely to spread beyond existing or predetermined boundaries.Despite this, Reynolds said that crews will continue to monitor these fires to try and ensure they don’t flare up once again.last_img read more

Jumia Sees Growth in MCommerce in Morocco

Rabat – As smartphone usage continues to spread through Morocco, the potential for mobile commerce in the country grows, says e-commerce leader Jumia in its latest report.The company presented its “White Paper Morocco Mobile 2017” during a press lunch hosted by Bastien Moreau Director General of Jumia Morocco and Benoît De Vigne, Marketing Manager of Jumia Morocco on Wednesday, April 19, 2017.credit to: Aujourd’huiL le MarocThe white paper outlined how the electronic market has democratized mobile internet use. With more consumers adopting electronic technology, smartphone culture, and various mobile brands, the role of mobile commerce (m-commerce) is increasing in the market.  The report was part of the company’s 2017  Mobile Africa Study, which was carried out in 15 African countries, namely Morocco, Algeria, Nigeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Mozambique, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Cameroon, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya and Senegal.Together, these countries generate more than 80% of Africa’s GDP.Smartphone penetration and usage rate is increasing rapidlyJumia highlighted that the mobile sector continues to flourish in the Kingdom. Out of 35.06 million citizens, the sector recorded 43.31 million mobile subscribers at the end of 2016, with a penetration rate of 124%, compared with an overall rate of 80% in Africa. With 8.1 million Moroccan mobile internet users, making up 23% of the population, “m-commerce is growing as fast as the mobile sector.” In Africa, the number of mobile internet users was at 28% by the end of 2016. These figures are expected to increase to around 55% by 2020, thanks to the diversity of services and prices offered by smartphone manufacturers and mobile operators.The decline in the average price of smartphones, geared the growth rate of penetration, allowed Smart phones to become an increasingly popular technology among Moroccan consumers with different incomes. Smartphones continue to be be Jumia’s most popular product in Morocco, both in number of items sold and in income generated. The sales of smartphones jumped by 108% between 2013 and 2016, driven by an increasing range of smartphone prices and the wide number choices in the market.M-commerce: Morocco’s Commerce FutureM-commerce has gained an important place in the world of e-commerce according to Jumia, proving that it is not a passing trend among Moroccan consumers.Jumia highlighted that 73 percent of its clients visit Jumia through their phones, with a successful purchase rate of 70 percent. The company added that 15 percent of mobile users use the Jumia app, while 58 percent% use the mobile version of the site.Jumia, in partnership with Orange, one of three licensed telecommunications operators in Morocco, promised to raise the standards of e-commerce in the country by using ever more innovative approaches. In addition, Jumia Morocco and the Interbank Money Center (IMC) have announced the launch of a new offer to promote online payment by credit card, intending to raise the share of online card payments on merchant sites and develop  mobile payment in Morocco by offering a 10% reduction for each customer paying by an online credit card. read more

SPTSX composite closes above 16000 mark for the first time loonie up

TORONTO — Canada’s largest stock index marched further into record territory Monday, closing above the 16,000 mark for the first time, despite modest declines on Wall Street.The S&P/TSX composite index rose 49.27 points to 16,002.78, led primarily by strengthening oil and gas shares, with some additional lift coming from health-care stocks.The energy sector was 1.76 per cent firmer as the December crude contract plumbed six month highs, advancing 25 cents to US$54.15 per barrel.“The broader take-away from today is that we’ve seen a bit of strength certainly coming from the energy sector, which is an area that has plagued the index for much of this year,” said Craig Fehr, a Canadian markets strategist at Edward Jones in St. Louis.“So in terms of the supply side we’ve seen a little bit of a bump to oil prices and that’s clearly helping the TSX today broadly.”Fehr pegged the rising price of crude on expectations that OPEC production cuts or freezes could be extended following news that Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest oil producer, supports extending an agreement by other major producers to limit output beyond next March. The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries is expected to take up the agreement at its next meeting on Nov. 30.Energy gains also came on the back of better U.S. third-quarter GDP data reported last Friday, which boosted demand prospects for oil.On the health-care front, an announcement by alcoholic beverage company Constellation Brands that it’s buying a 9.9 per cent stake in medical marijuana producer Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED) helped boost that sector by 3.66 per cent, with shares of the company surging 19 per cent to $15.22.Meanwhile, U.S. stocks pulled back from their record-setting run on Monday, and indexes elsewhere around the world took a pause ahead of a frenetic week for markets.Investors are waiting to see who will be President Donald Trump’s pick to head the Federal Reserve, what several of the world’s biggest central banks will decide on interest rates, and whether Apple and other big U.S. companies can keep piling their profits higher.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average fell 85.45 points to 23,348.74. The S&P 500 index was down 8.24 points to 2,572.83 and the Nasdaq composite index edged back 2.30 points to 6,698.96.In currency markets the Canadian dollar was trading at an average price of 77.90 cents US, up 0.22 of a U.S. cent.Elsewhere in commodities, The December gold contract was up US$5.90 to US$1,277.70 an ounce. The December natural gas contract was unchanged at US$2.97 per mmBTU and the December copper contract added a penny at US$3.11 a pound.– With files from The Associated Press.Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter read more

Sri Lanka says will firmly pursue One China policy

During their three-day visit, Penba Tashi also on several occasions advocated the system of the NPC, the national legislature of China, clarified China’s principled stance on Tibet-related issues and expressed hope that Sri Lanka would, as always, support China’s principled stance on Tibet-related issues. He also said Sri Lanka would further deepen exchanges in economy, trade, culture and other fields with China. Sri Lanka will continue its support for One China policy and push forward greater development of relations with China, a parliament leader and government officials have said, the Xinhua news agency reported.Sri Lanka appreciates the great achievements Tibet has made in various fields, Thilanga Sumathipala, Deputy Speaker of Sri Lanka’s parliament, said as he met with visiting delegation of Tibetan Deputies of the National People’s Congress (NPC) of China on Wednesday. Penba Tashi, Head of the delegation and Vice-Chairman of the Tibet Autonomous Region, briefed the hosts on the achievements in Tibet in the areas of political democracy, economic development, social undertakings, ecological protection and freedom of religious belief since the peaceful liberation of Tibet.He stressed that without the wise leadership of the Chinese Communist Party, the people of Tibet would not have had their happy life now and an even brighter future. The Chinese delegation also met with Wijayadasa Rajapaksha, minister of Buddha Sasana, famous Buddhist figures of Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka’s Parliamentary Friendship Group and a number of Sri Lankan and Chinese friendly groups. read more

UN conference to review progress of least developed countries during past five

Called the Midterm Review conference for the Istanbul Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries, it will take place in Antalya, in the south of Turkey, from 27 to 29 May.Adopted in 2011, the Istanbul Programme of Action (IPoA) is a plan that charts out the international community’s vision and strategy for the sustainable development of LDCs for the next decade.“[The conference] is important as it is taking place at a midpoint of the decade long Programme of Action, in the first year of the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals and the other global development frameworks,” Gyan Chandra Acharya, Under-Secretary-General and High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, told reporters at a press briefing.“We are taking stock of the successes but also challenges and lessons learned. It is also an opportunity to capitalize on the shared will of the international community to redouble efforts in accelerating support for the LDCs based on a strong national leadership and ownership,” added the UN official, who is also the High Representative for Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States.According to studies undertaken by the United Nations, the general economic growth of LDCs has been positive since 2011, rising by about 4 per cent in 2012 and by 5.3 per cent in 2014.“The challenge is that it is not shared equally by all,” stressed Mr. Acharya, adding that almost a quarter of the LDCs have a growth rate of more than 7 per cent, which is quite substantial.The senior UN official noted that progress can especially be seen in the area of human development, access to the internet and telephone networks, infrastructure expansion, access to energy, reduction of child and maternal mortality rates, access to primary education, and women’s representation in parliament. “But there are also many challenges. Incidence of poverty is still very high in these countries – almost half of the population is still below the poverty line,” he warned, underlining that many of the LDCs see their growth rates rise, but over time aren’t sustainable as many face conflict.“Looking ahead in the next five years, what we’re really trying to discuss in the conference is what are the challenges that [the LDCs] face, for which they require strong national leadership and ownership, but also what can the international community do about it, in terms of raising resources, in terms of strengthening their institutions, but also in terms of helping them accelerate progress and building reliance.”Participation is expected at the highest possible political level and will bring together various stakeholders, including representatives from governments, the private sector, multilateral organizations, civil society, and academia. The conference will result in an inter-governmentally negotiated and agreed outcome in the form of a political declaration.According to Mr. Acharya’s Office (OHRLLS), the LDCs represent the poorest and weakest segment of the international community. They comprise more than 880 million people.Their low level of socio-economic development is characterized by weak human and institutional capacities, low and unequally distributed income and scarcity of domestic financial resources. They often suffer from governance crisis, political instability and, in some cases, internal and external conflicts. Their largely agrarian economies are affected by a vicious cycle of low productivity and low investment. Only a handful has been able to diversify into the manufacturing sector, though with a limited range of products in labour-intensive industries, i.e. textiles and clothing. The category of LDCs was officially established in 1971 by the UN General Assembly with a view to attracting special international support for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged members of the UN family.The current list of LDCs includes 48 countries (the newest member being South Sudan); 34 in Africa, 13 in Asia and the Pacific and 1 in Latin America. For LDC country profiles, click here. read more

Save Idlib from transforming into a blood bath UN chief Guterres urges

Speaking to the press at UN Headquarters in New York on Tuesday afternoon, Secretary-General António Guterres said that the situation in Idlib is not sustainable and underscored that the presence of terrorist groups sheltering in the enclave cannot be tolerated. “But fighting terrorism does not absolve warring parties of their core obligations under international law.”He called on all parties, and in particular Iran, Russia and Turkey – the three guarantors of the “de-escalation zones”, of which Idlib is the last – to “spare no effort” in protecting civilians.[Idlib] must not be transformed into a blood bath – UN chief Guterres“Preserve basic services and hospitals. Ensure full respect for international humanitarian law,” he urged.The UN chief also cautioned against any use of chemical weapons, warning that, beyond the immediate human toll, such use would lead to the situation “spiralling out of control.”Mr. Guterres also highlighted the urgent need for greater progress in the Geneva process, and the creation of a constitutional committee as part of the overall political package.“There is no military solution to the conflict. The solution must be political,” he said.We as humanitarian advocates must raise our voice – UN aid agenciesEarlier in the day, UN relief agencies warned the situation in Idlib risks creating the worst humanitarian tragedy of the 21st century, amid concerns that a severe funding shortfall threatens the “most vulnerable” victims of the conflict.“We as humanitarian advocates must raise our voice,” said Jens Laerke from the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). “We are saying that this has the potential to be the worst crisis – humanitarian crisis – in the 21st century, because that is frankly what it looks like, if it goes ahead with a full-scale military operation.”Since 4 September, an uptick in violence has killed scores of civilians and displaced more than 30,000 people, Mr Laerke said.Reading a statement from Panos Moumtzis, Regional Humanitarian Coordinator for the Syria Crisis, the OCHA spokesperson noted that aerial and ground-based bombardment had struck northern rural Hama governorate and southern rural Idlib, and had been accompanied by an increase in retaliatory rocket and mortar attacks.The resulting impact on civilians has been “dramatic”, Mr. Laerke said, his concerns echoing those of UN Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock, who a day earlier had issued a warning about a military escalation in Idlib, after a recent meeting with Syria government officials in the country’s capital.Our fear as humanitarians is that the worst may be ahead of us – Panos Moumtzis, OCHA, Syria“As the Emergency Relief Coordinator mentioned, he was recently in Damascus”, noted Mr. Laerke, adding that the Syrian Government had indicated it would pursue a military solution “which is very, very scary from a humanitarian perspective.” “They have this capacity to kill and destroy,” Mr Laerke said. “We have seen it in use before, and we strongly advise that it does not happen in this enclosed area, where the population has, I think, almost doubled by the influx of evacuees and IDPs from other parts of the country.”In the space of less than a week, four hospitals have been hit in southern Idlib and neighbouring Hama governorate.This is contrary to international humanitarian law, the OCHA spokesperson said, adding that one of the hospitals was also in a protected “deconfliction zone”, whose coordinates had been given to the warring parties to spare it from attack.“Our fear as humanitarians is that the worst may be ahead of us,” the statement from Panos Moumtzis read. “The safety and protection of some 2.9 million civilians residing in Idlib and surrounding areas is at risk.”As UN agencies and their partners prepare to help those fleeing a full-scale military attack, UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, warned that $270 million is urgently needed to help Syria’s most vulnerable people inside and outside the war-torn country.Of more than 5.6 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt, 2.6 million are children.UNHCR’s total funding needs for the Syria crisis amount to nearly $2 billion. So far, only 31 per cent of this has been provided. read more

The Electric Mine conference charges ahead Seven worldclass speakers already confirmed

first_imgIM and IM Events have great pleasure in updating our readers and the wider world on progress with our new conference The Electric Mine. This will be the first global, commercial conference on electrification in mining. Mine electrification, in open pits and underground, is inevitable. Whether the rationale is tied to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving employee health, cutting ventilation costs or increasing productivity, future operations will all be using a form of electricity to power machinery. And while much of the technology to go all-electric remains in its infancy, a number of mines are already using or factoring in the use of electric equipment for the reasons above.The event is being held in the Radisson Admiral hotel on the Toronto Harbourfront in Canada on April 4-5, 2019, and will feature high quality presentations from miners, OEMs, engineering companies and think-tank institutions, highlighting technology advances, new designs and case studies from real mine trials or applications. Canada was the obvious choice given the work being done at mines like Borden and Macassa. The list below is only the start, we have a number of other world class presenters in the pipeline, and will also soon be announcing progress with sponsorship for the event. A limited number of exhibition booths will also be available. For sponsor and exhibitor information, and for any general enquiries about attending, please contact Paul Moore at paul@im-mining.com or Dan Gleeson at daniel@im-mining.com. We are also still open to any offers of presentationsSpeakers confirmed so far! The Electric Mine conferenceRadisson Admiral Hotel, Toronto Harbourfront in Canada on April 4-5, 2019Ali G. Madiseh, Canada Research Chair in Advanced Mine Energy Systems, Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining Engineering, University of British ColumbiaThe Electric Mine; a new norm in mine energy systemsHeather Ednie, Managing Director, Global Mining Guidelines GroupThe second edition of the Battery Electric Vehicle guideline – an overview of the available standards around BEV implementation undergroundMathieu Bouffard, Project Manager, Adria ManufactureBattery charging and power management of BEV in mining applicationsErik Isokangas, Program Director, Mining3Autonomous electric haulage – the value propositionJustin Bain, Chief Executive Officer, Energetique (Energy/Mobility)The death of diesel Down Under: an Australian storyChristian Dirscherl, Vice President for Mining, Excavation & Transport, SiemensThe highs and lows of extreme electrification: an exploration from underground to high altitudeDavid Willick, VP & Segment Leader for the Mining, Minerals & Metals segment, Schneider Electric North AmericaFrom batch to continuous process: will digital twin visibility and electric underground mining equipment be able to deliver continuous operation?last_img read more

Motion passed for the Battle of Crete

first_imgCalls for the national recognition of the Battle of Crete were made in Federal Parliament this week by Calwell MP Maria Vamvakinou and Hindmarsh MP Steve Georganas. The motion made in the House of Representatives by Mr Georganas and seconded by Ms Vamvakinou aimed to elevate the significance of the Battle of Crete among the wider Australian community was passed unanimously. The motion coincided with the 69th anniversary of The Battle of Crete which began on 20 May, 1941. Ms Vamvakinou said the loss endured by the local population and the gallantry of the soldiers is something that has forged an eternal bond between Australia and Greece and needs to be honoured. “We need to look at raising awareness about the Battle of Crete particularly among the younger Australian generations. “As a community, and as Australians of Greek background we need to consider ways to commemorate the Battle at Crete . “Perhaps we need to look at a campaign to include The Battle of Crete in school curricula, or have a commemorative stamp or coin issued.” Mr Georganas said: “When you think of all the significant battles Australian troops have participated in, you cannot go past the fact the Battle of Crete was among one of the most heroic tribulations. “Although the Battle of Crete has been mentioned in parliament before, this is the first time a formal motion was tabled, and agreed to by all sides of politics. “The motion is an opportunity to ensure we elevate the status of the Battle of Crete to ensure it is commemorated on an ongoing basis. “This is also an opportunity to remind people of the struggle and role that Australian and Greek soldiers played in World War II. I will continue to speak about the Battle of Crete as long as I am in Parliament.” Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Envol vert invite les Parisiens à une chasse aux papillons

first_imgEnvol vert invite les Parisiens à une chasse aux papillons Pour faire parler d’elle, l’ONG Envol Vert a mis en place une initiative originale : la chasse aux papillons… virtuels. Du 20 juin au 10 juillet, Parisiens et touristes armés de leur smartphone sont invités à chercher, capturer et partager sur Facebook les photos des logos peints aux quatre coins de la capitale. Si vous croisez au détour d’une ballade dans Paris l’image d’un papillon accompagnée du nom “Envol Vert” ne passez pas votre chemin ! L’ONG, impliquée dans la défense des forêts tropicale, a composé à l’aide de pochoirs et de peintures bio et lavables, pas moins d’une centaine de ces logos dispersés dans toute la capitale.À lire aussiJournée mondiale de l’environnement : Quelques astuces pour un mode de vie plus écolo au bureauL’initiative, baptisée “la chasse aux papillons” consiste à proposer aux Parisiens et touristes, de retrouver, photographier et partager sur la page Facebook (lien non disponible) de Envol Vert l’une de ces images à l’aide de leur smartphone. Les auteurs des images qui remporteront le plus de “Like” se verront récompensés de nombreux lots prévus par l’ONG, comme une nuit pour deux dans une cabane en haut d’un arbre. L’objectif de la chasse aux papillons est évidemment avant tout de faire parler d’Envol Vert à travers les réseaux sociaux, tout en proposant au public de s’amuser. “Nous voulons créer la surprise et éveiller le public, au travers du plaisir, du jeu et du divertissement” explique l’ONG sur son site. Elle précise également : “Le but n’est pas de culpabiliser les gens sur leurs actions, mais de leur proposer de jouer, pour qu’ils viennent avec plaisir et bonne humeur voir ce que nous faisons, et qu’ils en parlent autour d’eux”. Alors avis aux amateurs, la chasse est lancée ! Le 20 juin 2012 à 16:34 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Finally Someone Made a Beer That Tastes Like Lucky Charms

first_imgStay on target You can’t have an IPA without a healthy dose of hops. Balancing out the Lucky Charms sweetness are Galaxy and Calypso hops. Both are widely-used in IPAs, with Galaxy noted for its punch of citrus/peach/passionfruit and Calypso for apple/pear/lemon-lime notes.The resulting brew, Smartmouth says, “is sure to set you back with nostalgia, on the couch, turning on the best cartoons for a Saturday morning.”Now that you know what it’s all about you might be wondering where you can try it. Smartmouth doesn’t ship its brews and they only distribute within their home state of Virginia.If you’re going to head on out to sample Saturday Morning you might want to schedule your trip for this weekend. On March 2nd Smartmouth is hosting “Saturday Morning All Day,” with a Super Smash Bros. tournament, board games galore, live music, and a cosplay contest. Sounds like a helluva good time to us!More on Geek.com:A Brewery Is Making Beer From Rejected Corn FlakesThis Italian City Gives You Free Beer For Riding Your BikeBud Light to Debut Nutritional Label on Packaging Fiber-Based Six-Pack Can Rings Offer Eco-Friendly Alternative to PlasticEven More Kellogg’s Cereal Gets Re-Born as Craft Beer center_img It’s an amazing time to be a beer drinker. There are thousands of craft breweries in the U.S. alone and there’s no end the the creative (and downright bizarre) beers they’re dreaming up.Beers like Saturday Morning Marshmallow IPA. Yes Geek.com readers, there’s finally a beer that lets you satisfy your grown-up craving for a tasty beer with your nostalgic side that yearns for a sugary bowl of Lucky Charms at the same time!Saturday Morning wasn’t just inspired by the cereal’s trademark marshmallows. The adventurous crew at  Smartmouth Brewing actually infused their “magically ridiculous” brew with a whole whack of them straight out of the boxes. Presumably they gave the boring old cereal to their younger siblings, because that’s how it works with Lucky Charms.Rather risk the marshmallowy taste coming through in the final product Smartmouth doubled down. To make sure you know it’s there they also added a heaping helping of toasted marshmallow.last_img read more

Triple H back in the ring for WWE UK tour Charlotte talks

first_img Becky Lynch Videos Articles Now Playing Up Next WWE Female Superstars Get Green Light To Bounce Between Brands Now Playing Up Next Pinterest Recommended videosPowered by AnyClipWWE Female Superstars Get Green Light To Bounce Between BrandsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 0:34/Current Time 0:03Loaded: 85.88%0:03Remaining Time -0:31 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Twitter WhatsApp Now Playing Up Next WWE Royal Rumble Card Update For 2019 New stipulation added to Roman Reigns vs. Erick Rowan this Sunday at Clash of Champions WWE Clash of Champions Results – 9/15/19 (Rollins vs. Strowman, Kingston vs. Orton) Videos Articles Charlotte Flair And Becky Lynch Involved In Brawl At An Unlikely Location Now Playing Up Next Triple H back in the ring for WWE UK tourWWE.com is featuring an article about Triple H returning to the ring for the WWE’s upcoming UK tour that kicks off next week in Glasgow.Triple H will wrestle at live events on November 1 in Glasgow, November 2 in Brighton, November 3 in London, November 4 in Minehead and November 5 in Cardiff.U.K., be ready. I’ll be there. In the middle of the ring.Glasgow 11/1Brighton 11/2London 11/3Minehead 11/4Cardiff 11/5#WWEUKTour— Triple H (@TripleH) October 27, 2017Charlotte talks Ric FlairCharlotte Flair was on ESPN this week discussing her father Ric Flair and the upcoming ESPN 30 for 30 special that will premiere on November 7. Google+ Videos Articles Facebook Becky Lynch Announces Replacement to Face Ronda Rousey Ronda Rousey Now Playing Up Next Adam Martin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Asuka, Becky Lynch, And Charlotte In Triple Threat Title Match Cricket Wireless to host Live Twitter Q and A with Ric and Charlotte Flair September 17 Charlotte Flairlast_img read more

WWE signs Kuwaiti man and Arab woman Kevin Nash surgery

first_imgFacebook Now Playing Up Next December 9, 2017 at 2:22 pm Videos Articles Cesaro Now Playing Up Next Ronda Rousey Highlighting WWEs Problems Now Playing Up Next Videos Articles Seth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate Occasions Jinder Mahal undergoes surgery on a ruptured patella tendon, posts update on recovery WWE signs Kuwaiti man and Arab womanWWE.com is reporting that WWE has signed the first Kuwaiti man and Arab woman to deals during the company’s current tour of Abu Dhabi and India this week.WWE confirmed the signings for Nasser Alruwayeh and Shadia Bseiso on Friday.Another historic moment here in #WWEAbuDhabi as we welcome @shadiabseiso, the first woman from the Middle East and Nasser Alruwayeh the first Kuwaiti signee, to @WWE. @WWEmena pic.twitter.com/DnFbZlazQL— Triple H (@TripleH) December 8, 2017Kevin Nash surgeryWWE Hall of Famer Kevin Nash shared a graphic photo on Twitter showing off a recent knee replacement surgery he underwent, something Nash fixed after “33 years.” Videos Articles Google+ Joan Jett Set To Perform Ronda Rouseys Entrance At WrestleMania 35 Seth Rollins Kurt Anglecenter_img WWE Hall of Famer Kevin Nash reveals he recently underwent stem cell treatment Twitter Now Playing Up Next Recommended videosPowered by AnyClipSeth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate OccasionsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 0:30/Current Time 0:02Loaded: 100.00%0:02Remaining Time -0:28 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Roman Reigns is in Remission theshoebox503 Now Playing Up Next WhatsApp Adam Martin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Ronda Rousey On WWE: I Love This Job, But I Dont Need It 1 COMMENT Pinterest Ruby Riott undergoes second shoulder surgery of the year, Rachel Evers has knee surgery That’s fake Comments are closed.last_img read more

Man killed riding scooter in Chula Vista

first_img KUSI Newsroom, CHULA VISTA (KUSI) – A man riding a scooter died after being struck by a car on a Chula Vista street early Saturday morning. The crash happened around 4 a.m. near the intersection of Third Avenue and Quintard Street, Chula Vista Police Lt. Rusty Rea said. The scooter rider was taken to a local hospital, where he died. The driver stayed at the scene and was cooperating with investigators, Rea said. Drugs or alcohol were not believed to be factors in the crash. Authorities didn’t immediately release the victim’s identity. FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom Man killed riding scooter in Chula Vistacenter_img December 22, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News Posted: December 22, 2018last_img read more

Government fulfilling all poll promises Botcha

first_imgKurnool: Minister for Municipal Administration and Urban Development (MAUD) Botcha Satyanarayana has participated in the 73rd Independence Day celebrations organised at Police Parade Grounds here on Thursday. Botcha, who is also Kurnool In-charge Minister, has unfurled the tricolour flag accompanied by Labour Minister G Jayaram and received the guard of honour from the police personnel. In his speech, the Minister stated that the State government is fulfilling all election promises made to people. He enlisted the decisions taken by the government in the last 2 months. Also Read – Fit India rally held in Vijayawada Advertise With Us Later, he issued identity cards to the ward volunteers. He said as many as 14,255 village volunteers were selected in rural areas and 5.300 as ward volunteers for urban segments. The cultural programmes of the schoolchildren have enthralled the audience. District Collector G Veera Pandian, SP K Fakkeerappa, MLAs and other officials were present.last_img read more

For Amazon Cloud Wars Heat Up

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. To avoid the hassle of operating data centers, many companies hand the job off to Amazon. In addition to being the biggest online retailer, Amazon has built a giant business of renting servers to customers that need computing power to crunch numbers, stream movies and process orders.But Amazon, the leading so-called “cloud services platform,” faces an increasingly stiff challenge. Rivals like Microsoft are slowly gaining ground in what is a key battleground between some of the technology industry’s biggest companies.“Cloud platforms are the service of choice for modern software, which means that all the big businesses who have a significant stake in app development or distribution are getting into this space. They have to,” says James Staten, a Forrester Research analyst.Amazon’s Web Services, the name of its data center arm, controlled up to 75% of the global cloud platforms market in 2013, according to Forrester Research analyst James Staten. But that share is expected to drop to around 65% by the end of this year.Meanwhile, Microsoft, a distant second in the race with what is known as Azure, had 15% of the market in 2013. That share is expected to climb to 25% by the end of the year.The potential for cloud computing remains huge. Corporations could spend as much as $235 billion on it in 2017, more than triple the amount they spent in 2011, according to IHS Technology. It’s no wonder then companies like Microsoft, Google, Salesforce, SAP and Oracle are ramping up efforts to meet demand.Created in 2006, Amazon Web Services gambled early on the idea of building data centers that stored and processed information for other businesses. Now that data center division, which is estimated to generate around $5.5 billion in revenues this year, has over 1 million customers like NASA, Netflix and Spotify.“The cloud is the new normal,” boasted Andy Jassy, Amazon Web Services SVP, at the cloud platform’s annual conference in Las Vegas last week where the company unveiled tools to make software development easier and cheaper.Microsoft pushed into the so-called “cloud” long before Satya Nadella became CEO in February. But it was Nadella who championed a more cloud-focused strategy inside the company.Signing up data customers is critical for Microsoft, which has had huge success in selling software for personal computers but has stumbled as people have shifted to mobile devices. The company is betting that business services like Azure are a big part of its future.Microsoft is trying to close the gap through lower prices and by rapidly introducing new features. Jeffrey Hammond, a Forrester Research analyst, said that Azure is easier to learn for new customers that lack technical experience.“I think that’s often how developers feel,” Hammond says. “There are a lot of different choices, and it’s not always clear what the best thing to do is.”Still, Amazon Web Services remains the platform of choice for startups such as Spotify, Airbnb and Pinterest. Azure, meanwhile, is more popular with larger companies such as Xerox, eBay and McKesson. (According to Staten, more startups are starting to use Azure, but in many of those cases, the startup has some prior history with Microsoft.) Both platforms must round out their services more to fuel growth.Microsoft is marketing its cloud as being more flexible than Amazon’s. Traditionally, Amazon’s servers hosted and processed the vast majority of their customers’ information. Microsoft, in contrast, uses a more “hybrid” approach in which customers can store and process some of their data with Microsoft while doing the rest on their own servers. That’s appealing to customers that want more ownership over their information but still want some of the cloud’s benefits.Microsoft’s “hybrid” approach could prove more lucrative, at least in the near-future. By 2017, Gartner estimates that nearly 50% of all large enterprises in the U.S. will run off some kind of hybrid cloud set-up. Even Amazon gets the appeal. Earlier this year, Amazon CTO Werner Vogels said his company would offer some tools to help customers go hybrid if that is what they want.“What we’re ultimately seeing here is huge change,” says Hammond, comparing the move to cloud services to the rise of the Web.For Amazon Web Services, Azure and others battling for the cloud platform market, the trend signals something they already know: Game on. This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine 4 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » November 19, 2014last_img read more

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first_imgVideos | April 22, 2015 Creating an Enterprise Imaging System at Cleveland Clinic: HIMSS 2015 Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Information Technology View all 220 items Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Women’s Health View all 62 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 10:02Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -10:02 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  During HIMSS 2015, Louis Lannum, director, ITD enterprise imaging, information technology division, Cleveland Clinic, explained in sessions how to create an enterprise imaging system that goes beyond PACS to service all imaging and data needs of departments in the hospital enterprise. Technology Reports View all 9 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting.last_img read more

Enrique Iglesias Raphael and other happenings around Costa Rica

first_imgMusic: RaphaelSpanish superstar Raphael has enjoyed a 56-year-career, singing and acting all over the world. While this may not necessarily be your final chance to see the septuagenarian celebrity perform, Raphael fans should probably take the opportunity when he arrives at the National Gymnasium. Looking to brush up? Raphael has more than 50 albums to choose from.Concert takes place May 5 at the National Gymnasium, La Sabana Park, San José. 8 p.m. ₡25,000 – 85,000 ($50-170). Info: eTicket website.Music: “Long Live Rock”Are you ready to rock? This festival brings together 20 Costa Rican bands of all different styles, from metal to grunge to Beatles covers. Admission gets you two full days of favorite bands, including the legendary Vargas Brothers.“Larga Vida al Rock” takes place May 1 & 2 at La Isla de Guilligan, Aserrí. Fri. & Sat., 2 p.m. onward. ₡15,000 ($30). Info: Venue Facebook page. Courtesy of RedCulturaTheater: “The Segua”As everyone knows, the “Segua” is a classic Costa Rican story of a man who pursues a beautiful woman on a lonely road, only to watch her transform into a demonic horse. See how playwright Alberto Cañas Escalante interprets the tale, thanks to an innovative new production by The National Theater Company.“La Segua” continues through June 14 at the Aduana Theater, Aranjuez, San José. ₡5,000 ($10). Info: Company Facebook page. Facebook Comments Music: Enrique Iglesias, Capital CitiesIt’s here, the moment many a Tica has been awaiting: Enrique Iglesias is arriving in Costa Rica. The Spanish mega-star will descend on Parque VIVA with his unique blend of Latin pop – and the screaming of fans should be audible for miles around. (He doesn’t call it the “Sex and Love” tour for nothing.) Iglesias will share the stage with California indie pop band Capital Cities.Concert takes place May 2 at the Parque VIVA Amphitheater, Guácima. 7 p.m. ₡15,950 – 48,950 ($32 – 98). Info: eTicket website.Festival: Final Days of FIAIt’s been a long and brutal battle, but FIA is finally wrapping up, and this weekend may redeem the anarchy that preceded it. CENAC brings you and all-day, international music cycle, including Golden Ganga (Mexico), Skampida (Colombia), and Easy Easy (Guatemala).Concerts take place May 3 at the CENAC, Barrio Amón, San José. 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Free. Info: FIA Facebook page. Related posts:Van Gogh’s Ear, a storytelling festival, and other happenings around Costa Rica Valentine’s Day, lyrical boleros, and other happenings around Costa Rica Design Festival, Marine Corps picnic, and other happenings around Costa Rica Shakespearean ballet, outdoor tango, and other happenings around Costa Ricalast_img read more