This Bud’s for UW students, MLB fans

first_imgBRYAN FAUST/Herald photoBud Selig may be a lot of things, but when I heard him speak Tuesday night, the commissioner of Major League Baseball came off as a passionate baseball fan who loves his job.The grumpy, standoffish disciplinarian, who will be forever linked to one of the most embarrassing periods in professional sports, was candid, humorous and approachable Tuesday when he spoke at the Hillel Theater.Selig, a Jewish University of Wisconsin alumnus, spoke and fielded questions about hot-button topics like the steroid scandal and his new drug testing policy.Going into the event, I assumed Selig would talk about his experiences as a UW student (which he touched upon), how he became commissioner and avoid issues like steroids and the infamous all-star game tie in 2002. But instead of avoiding or dancing around those issues, Selig took them on with a full head of steam. “I’ll beat you to the punch,” Selig said when first mentioning steroids, knowing the questions would be coming during the question and answer portion of the program.”I have no sensibility left, ask me anything you want,” he said.Unfortunately, yours truly was not called upon to ask any of the tough questions I prepared, and Selig declined to be interviewed personally — but many important issues were raised by other students in attendance.I have never been a fan of Bug Selig and I will never forgive him for his ineptness in handling the steroid scandal — even though he maintains he never knew of any drug problems until 1998 when Andro was discovered in Mark McGwire’s locker … um, yeah, sure.The way he handled the All-Star game in 2002 was atrocious. But Tuesday night I realized that, like many baseball fans, I have been harping on those issues for years while disregarding the triumphs Selig has achieved as commissioner.Selig has been working in baseball for more than 40 years, with 14 as acting commissioner, and according to him his job is to “give hope and faith to fans that their team can win.”For years, Selig has been taking heat for the lack of a salary cap in baseball, while other professional leagues, such as the NFL and the NBA, have enjoyed great success after implementing some form of cap.What many baseball fans have overlooked is that the MLB Players Association has made it clear that no form of a salary cap will ever be acceptable. Selig took the issue a step further by implementing revenue sharing to help narrow the economic divide in baseball. Selig has generated $321 million in revenue sharing, and its benefits are being seen every year as small-market teams like the Tigers, Athletics and Twins will all be in the postseason come October.Although the system needs a little tweaking to ensure teams are spending their shared money correctly and not fielding a team with a $15 million payroll like the Florida Marlins, Selig is on the right track to closing the gap between big and small-market teams.In 1994 (although it did not come into effect until 1995 because of the players’ strike), Selig added a team from each league to the playoffs. The wild card race always proves to be one of the most riveting chases in professional sports, and with recent wild card representatives, the Diamondbacks, Angels, Marlins and Red Sox, winning four of the last five World Series, it’s hard to imagine what baseball would be like without it.While many baseball purists will forever be against interleague play, we can all thank Selig for giving us the chance to watch in-state rivalries be fought on the field, as opposed to having them settled in schoolyards around the country.Interleague play was finally added to the schedule in 1996, and according to Selig, he had been fighting for it since the ’70s. Interleague play has also given way to new rivalries that fans would never have expected to emerge.Selig added another feather in his cap when he established the World Baseball Classic. Yes, this year’s format was a little shaky, and improvements will undoubtedly be necessary in the future, but the WBC was quite successful in its first go-around and the event should grow in popularity in years to come. Cynics will always be opposed to what they call a “made-up event,” but when I saw the Dominican team take the field or Roger Clemens take the mound in March, the intensity was similar to a playoff game. Maybe the United States will actually win it someday, but that’s neither here nor there.Selig’s innovative All-Star game format, in which the winner is awarded home-field advantage in the World Series, has given new life to a dying exhibition game. Before 2003, I found the MLB All-Star game as excruciating as the Pro Bowl.This year’s game was dramatic and eventful as the American League completed a two-out rally in the ninth inning off all-time saves leader Trevor Hoffman. The game finally has some pizzazz, and the new format forces managers to actually manage the game, as opposed to acting like tee-ball coaches struggling to make sure everyone gets equal playing time.Selig’s accomplishments over the last 14 years will always be overshadowed by the steroid scandal. He will forever be remembered as the commish that could not or would not recognize a problem bigger than Barry Bonds’ head. But recently, Selig has done all he can to gain the fans’ trust by installing the toughest drug-testing policy in professional sports — even though it took him long enough to get it done. The big boppers have remained clean recently (aside from Rafael “I have never used steroids” Palmeiro), and slowly but surely, the integrity of the game is being restored.And while this is not an excuse, it’s becoming clear that steroids are part of every professional sport. Scandals involving the NFL and the Carolina Panthers are minor stories compared to the steroid saga that plagues Major League Baseball, and it would be naíve to think that the NHL and NBA are completely clean.Baseball is deemed “America’s pastime,” and it will forever be held to a higher standard. Before you lynch Selig, remember that the Players Association refused any form of testing until 2002.Many of you traditionalists out there might hate the WBC, interleague play or the new All-Star format, but apparently you are in the minority, because attendance is up and baseball is more profitable than ever. At season’s end, baseball will have broken its attendance record for the third consecutive year as over 73 million fans have gone to the ballpark this season.Selig’s tenure has been controversial, to say the least, and I don’t buy into everything he said Tuesday, like when he referred to today’s game as “the golden age of baseball,” because I think my dad, and yours, might take exception with that. But one thing he said rang very true.”Baseball is the greatest game there is,” and Bud Selig has something to do with that.Andrew is a junior majoring in journalism. To share your thoughts on Bud Selig, e-mail him at akluger@badgerherald.comlast_img read more

Wide receiver Hill suffers lower-body injury, out for season

first_img Published on August 26, 2013 at 5:18 pm Contact Trevor: tbhass@syr.edu | @TrevorHass Syracuse wide receiver Macauley Hill will miss the entire 2013 season after suffering a lower-body injury that will require surgery.Hill did not play in any games for the Orange in either his freshman or sophomore season. A 6-foot, 205-pound junior from Port Huron, Mich., Hill joined SU as a walk-on before the start of the 2011 season.Syracuse faces Penn State in its season opener at MetLife Stadium on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Comments AdvertisementThis is placeholder textcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Ainsley Carry reflects on his tenure at USC

first_img“We were just hearing from parents, current students, former students about the rigor of going through this process in their very first year,” Carry said. “So with our student leaders in Greek letter organizations, we brought the topic forward.” “I don’t want to create the impression that everybody jumped up and said, ‘Yes, let’s do this! Let’s require first-year students to shut out a semester,’” Carry said. “That wasn’t the spirit of it … [but] we have to think about the mental health and well-being of students in their first year of enrollment.” According to the Provost’s website, the Vice President for Student Affairs is responsible for supporting students through his campus-wide initiatives. While his goals were centered on cultivating student support and advocacy, promoting student involvement and creating educational experiences outside of the classroom, Carry’s biggest priority was to make USC the healthiest campus in America. “Students are the heart of USC, and walking across campus with Ainsley shows how much of a personal connection he’s forged with them — they stop him every few steps,” Provost Michael Quick wrote in a statement to the Daily Trojan. “Thanks to his work with Residential Education programs and his drive to heighten the student experience all across USC, Ainsley will leave a lasting legacy of deep engagement with and care for our students.” Based on these discussions, Carry and the rest of the task force realized that the gaps in inclusion on campus posed health issues that required immediate action. In response to Carry’s letter, the Panhellenic Council expressed that it was ready to work closely and openly with the University to implement the changes. Meanwhile, IFC leadership released a letter opposing the decision, including a proposal for a public meeting with administration and non-binding mediation. Carry said that in listening sessions he held with IFC and Panhellenic, members brought up concerns about how the decision would affect various facets of Greek life such as philanthropy due to financial losses from lack of recruitment. As a result, the administration met with IFC and Panhellenic to discuss their finances. “Whether it’s at USC, Auburn, Arkansas or UBC, my commitment to the work is the engagement [with students], which is what energizes me,” Carry said. “That’s what keeps me going and is what keeps me coming back.” Despite backlash that the plan fails to support minority groups, USC is one of the first universities in the nation to adopt the plan campus-wide. As such, much is still unknown about Collective Impact. For public health In his six years at USC, Carry placed equity, diversity and inequity at the forefront of his agenda. After holding the diversity forums and round table discussions, Carry aimed to improve the campus culture for students. “These are issues of life and death.” “I wouldn’t say mission accomplished on that topic yet,” Carry said. “It’s ongoing, constant work. But we did a lot to start the momentum of moving that ball forward.” Additionally, Carry worked with the Undergraduate Student Government to set requirements for executive board members of registered student organizations to go through training on matters of diversity. In September 2017, Carry released a letter to the USC community officially instating new Greek recruitment requirements of a minimum USC GPA of 2.5 and 12 completed units for the Interfraternity and Panhellenic councils. These standards, which were made effective in Fall 2018, barred first-semester freshmen and new transfer students from joining Greek life in the fall. Carry said members of the task force took on the “daunting” request for mandatory diversity education to enforce diversity training and initiatives through Residential Education. Resident assistants now undergo required training on social justice and diversity before they are able to conduct programs. On April 1, Carry will be appointed vice president for students at UBC. Carry said he is thrilled about USC President-elect Carol Folt’s ability to steer universities in the right direction. That year, in response to student protests at colleges across the nation including USC, Carry established the Diversity Task Force. He worked with the task force to expand cultural spaces and hire people to staff them. And to increase transparency, Quick required all USC schools to make the their faculty demographics available online. Each school also established a diversity liaison who would be responsible for improving the diversity within their school through a five-year plan. Restructuring Greek life “Initially I thought to myself, [that phrase] may be overdramatizing it,” said Carry, who came to USC from Auburn University in 2013. “But as I continued to listen to the students, they were sharing pain. They were talking about, ‘I don’t feel like I belong here. I’m scared to go out at night. I can’t concentrate in class because I was called a certain name, or a faculty member used my race as an example in a session.’” Aside from diversity initiatives, Carry also led the implementation of USC Student Health’s Collective Impact Plan, a new cross-sector strategy that promotes shared governance and stakeholder input as a means of improving overall campus well-being. “There are 50 topics that are important when you get to USC,” Carry said. “There’s so many things that people care about. Equity, diversity and inclusion weren’t the only ones, so the class has a number of components in that space.”center_img In light of lawsuits against USC and former campus gynecologist George Tyndall for his decades of alleged sexual abuse of patients, the Office of Healthy Promotion Strategy has served as the “backbone” of the plan, which aims to cultivate four pillars: equity and inclusion, individual and communal well-being, substance abuse prevention and healthy relationships. “What we wanted to do was say, as part of the residential community, let’s trip in our position around equity, diversity and inclusion so that as part of the living experience, they can be engaged with that,” Carry said. “As we went around and met with different types of students and different groups of students, the things we were promoting as the Trojan experience were not acceptable to all,” Carry said. “So depending on what you join and who you are related to, you had access to different things.” When Carry and members of the task force were building the first-year wellness seminar course, they conducted analyses across schools and departments to evaluate the first-year experience at USC. Students brought up the rigor of pledging Greek life organizations, an issue Carry’s predecessors also attempted to address. During Ainsley Carry’s six years at USC and three years as Vice President of Student Affairs, he focused on initiatives to improve student health and diversity and inclusivity. ( Andy Hsu/Daily Trojan) Ainsley Carry recalls hearing this phrase back in early 2016 when he first started listening to students share their experiences at USC. As Vice President for Student Affairs, Carry helped lead the Provost’s then-newly established Diversity Task Force, which held roundtable discussions open to the University community every two weeks. And the responses they got revealed that students did not feel like they belonged at USC. “The toughest challenge with any student groups is that they graduate, they move on, so the knowledge leaves, and you’ve got to re-educate the next year to say, ‘Hey, we want you to know that [hazing] is inappropriate,” Carry said. “So every year we have to be vigilant about keeping the education.” “When we start to think about diversity and inclusion as a public health matter, it changes the types of solutions that we start to perceive and think about,” Carry said. “That’s been an important area of progress.” “When a person doesn’t feel like they belong or don’t feel connected or feel marginalized, that impacts their health, and then their study habits, eating habits to sleeping habits,” Carry said. Moving forward In the past year, five Greek organizations were investigated: Pi Kappa Phi, Theta Xi, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Sigma Kappa and Sigma Alpha Mu. Now, Carry said that he has received more reports, regarding hazing in campus organizations than before, including one dating back to 2015. Faculty members notified Carry that groups of male students fall asleep in early morning classes every semester — and most of the time, they are pledging fraternities. According to Carry, parents also expressed concerns that freshmen feel pressured to join fraternities and sororities immediately and asked if the University could amend Greek life, so students could properly adjust to college. Another concern Carry attempted to address was hazing, especially in Greek organizations. When the administration receives a report of hazing, it conducts an investigation while it places the organization on an interim suspension. If the Office of Student Judicial Affairs and Community Standards finds credible evidence, the organization will be sanctioned accordingly. On Dec. 4, Carry announced he would leave USC to become the Vice President for Students at the University of British Columbia in an email to the community. His appointment will begin April 1. According to Carry, students also wanted to enforce mandatory diversity education. As a result, members of the task force, along with student leaders and the Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, began developing a one-unit course titled “THRIVE: Foundations of Well-Being” to advise students on wellness skills ranging from stress management to sustainability. Carry said he hopes to have left a legacy that gives the University the momentum to address critical issues across campus, but what he will miss most about USC — and is excited about at UBC — is engaging with the student body. “I can’t think of anybody more capable to lead us right now,” Carry said. “She has been through many of these things at University of North Carolina … She faced real pressure around monument removal on campus, so she understands how to run in a large organization and help us get better.” “[And] unfortunately, in the past two years, we’ve had to suspend quite a few organizations, and I’m not a fan of that,” Carry said. “I want healthy Greek communities on our campus or a better community where students have organizations to join and participate in … We cannot sacrifice a healthy Greek community for student health and wellness.”last_img read more

Watch Photos: Pacquiao gets to work for Mayweather clash

first_imgWBO welterweight champion Manny Pacquiao is putting in the hard graft ahead of the Filipino’s eagerly-anticipated clash with arch-nemesis Floyd Mayweather Jr.The pound for pound pair collide on May 2 in Las Vegas as the world famous MGM Grand in Las Vegas in a fight to finally decide who is the best fighter of this generation.last_img

Angels shake off rough start, beat Astros to extend win streak to 4

first_imgMeanwhile, the Angels’ lineup went to work. After Simmons’ fifth home run of the season in the third inning, the Angels got a pair of runs in the fourth inning against left-hander Framber Valdez (3-6). Upton and Pujols hit back-to-back doubles. Pujols came around to score on a sacrifice fly by Smith, tying the score at 3-3.Valdez allowed four runs in the fifth inning as the Angels pulled away for good. The key hit: a bases-loaded single by Pujols that drove in a pair of runs.Pujols’ double was the 643rd of his career, matching Honus Wagner for eighth place on the all-time list. No player has driven in more runs against the Astros in his career than Pujols’ 160.A win Tuesday would give the Angels five in a row for the first time since April. They have momentum, and perhaps a returning superstar, to lean on.“I would never call a July series critical,” Ausmus said, “but we’re chasing them so it’s probably more important for us than it is for them.” PreviousANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Albert Pujols #5, Justin Upton #8, David Fletcher #6 and Michael Hermosillo celebrate a 9-6 win over the Houston Astros at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)The Angels’ Albert Pujols drives in two runs with a single during the fifth inning of Monday’s game against the Houston Astros at Angel Stadium. Pujols went 3 for 4 with three RBIs in the team’s 9-6 comeback victory. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Griffin Canning #47 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches in the second inning against the Houston Astros at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Angels starting pitcher Griffin Canning throws to the Houston Astros during the first inning of a baseball game, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Houston Astros’ Alex Bregman (2) is high-fived in the dugout after scoring on a bases-loaded walk to Josh Reddick during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Griffin Canning #47 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches against the Houston Astros in the first inning at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Griffin Canning #47 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim covers the plate as Myles Straw #26 of the Houston Astros scores as the result of a wild pitch in the second inning of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Houston Astros’ Myles Straw, bottom, scores on a wild pitch by Angels starting pitcher Griffin Canning, top, during the second inning of a baseball game, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Los Angeles Angels catcher Kevan Smith, right, talks to starting pitcher Griffin Canning during the second inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Houston Astros starting pitcher Josh James throws to the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani prepares to bat against the Houston Astros during the first inning of a baseball game, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim lost his helmet swinging at a pitch in the first inning against Houston Astrosat Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Houston Astros first baseman Yuli Gurriel (10) catches the throw to first base on a ground out by Los Angeles Angels’ Andrelton Simmons (2) during the first inning of a baseball game, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Houston Astros’ Alex Bregman (2) drives in a run with a single during the second inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Luis Rengifo #4 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and Tony Kemp #18 of the Houston Astros hop off the bag after Kemp was forced out at second base in the thrid inning at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Robinson Chirinos #28 of the Houston Astros stands at home plate as Shohei Ohtani #17 congratulates Andrelton Simmons #2 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim for his home run in the third inning at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols drives in two runs with a single during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani slides home safely ahead of the throw to Astros catcher Robinson Chirinos after a single by Albert Pujols during the fifth inning of Monday’s game at Angel Stadium. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout jokes with teammates in the dugout before the start of a baseball game against the Houston Astros, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Angels manager Brad Ausmus high-fives a member of his team before a baseball game against the Houston Astros, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Los Angeles Angels’ Kevan Smith drives in a run with a double during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, right, scores past Houston Astros catcher Robinson Chirinos after a double by Kevan Smith and a throwing error by Astros second baseman Jose Altuve during the seventh inning of a baseball game, Monday, July 15, 2019, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Kevan Smith #44 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim embraces Hansel Robles #57 after the final out against the Houston Astros for a 9-6 win at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – JULY 15: Albert Pujols #5, Justin Upton #8, David Fletcher #6 and Michael Hermosillo celebrate a 9-6 win over the Houston Astros at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 15, 2019 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)The Angels’ Albert Pujols drives in two runs with a single during the fifth inning of Monday’s game against the Houston Astros at Angel Stadium. Pujols went 3 for 4 with three RBIs in the team’s 9-6 comeback victory. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)NextShow Caption1 of 23The Angels’ Albert Pujols drives in two runs with a single during the fifth inning of Monday’s game against the Houston Astros at Angel Stadium. Pujols went 3 for 4 with three RBIs in the team’s 9-6 comeback victory. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)ExpandANAHEIM — The count was full, the bases were loaded and Griffin Canning needed to throw a strike to Josh Reddick. The rookie right-hander reared back and fired a fastball over the plate. The Angels’ catcher, Kevan Smith, caught the ball somewhere above the height of Reddick’s chin and below the ridge of his nose. Reddick walked to first base with the easiest RBI a man can collect.Unfortunately for Canning, the worst start of his brief major league career only got worse.Fortunately for the Angels, it didn’t matter.Trailing 3-0 in the second inning, the Angels scored seven unanswered runs en route to a 9-6 victory over the Houston Astros before an announced crowd of 35,431 at Angel Stadium. Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield “It was just one of those games where early on you just want to help pick up your teammate,” said Angels pitcher Taylor Cole, who relieved Canning with one out in the second inning. “I’ve been in those situations as a starter.”Without the services of Mike Trout, who is nursing a strained right calf muscle, the Angels won their fourth consecutive game since the All-Star break. At 49-46, they’re three games above .500 for the first time all season, and 10 games behind the first-place Astros (59-36) in the American League West.Albert Pujols went 3 for 4 with three RBIs. David Fletcher and Justin Upton each had two hits, and Smith drove in three runs. Andrelton Simmons, batting second in place of the injured Trout, hit a solo home run to kickstart the Angels’ come-from-behind rally.Trout will avoid the injured list and could return to the lineup as early as Tuesday. He’s hit eight home runs in nine July games.“He did most of the damage as of late, but everybody else has been putting up good at-bats,” Simmons said. “Even though we missed him a bit today, we kept putting together good at-bats.”center_img Canning functioned as an “opener” on a day the Angels weren’t planning to use one. He needed two pitches to retire the first two hitters, George Springer and Jose Altuve. He fell behind the next hitter, Alex Bregman, 2-and-1, then threw a pair of borderline pitches that umpire Jim Reynolds called balls. Bregman took his base.On a 1-and-1 count to Yordan Alvarez, Canning threw three pitches off the outside corner to the left-handed slugger – another walk. The next batter, Yuli Gurriel, also drew a five-pitch walk, loading the bases for Reddick. Reddick saw six pitches and swung at one. Two were curveballs in the dirt. Ball four missed a foot high. Canning then struck out Robinson Chirinos to end the first inning.Canning also struck out Tony Kemp to begin the second inning before he completely unraveled.Myles Straw walked. Springer dumped a single into right field. Straw went to third base, then scored on a wild pitch. Altuve walked. Both runners moved up on another wild pitch, then Bregman singled home Springer. With the score 3-0, Manager Brad Ausmus mercifully removed Canning, ending the shortest start of his career after 1⅓ innings.“Obviously I’m not just gonna look past it,” Canning said. “I don’t think I need to panic. I’ll watch the videos. I don’t think there was anything mechanical at all. I’m not gonna feel sorry for myself, just gonna keep working.”Canning’s final line was historically bad. No Angels pitcher had ever walked six batters and thrown four wild pitches in a game. No major league pitcher since at least 1908 threw four wild pitches, walked six, and recorded four outs or fewer.Control has always been an asset for Canning, a second-round draft pick out of UCLA and a former standout at Santa Margarita High. He said he’d endured such an extreme bout of wildness “maybe once before.”“Griffin, he’s going to be a horse for us for a long time,” Cole said. “Everybody is going to go through ups and downs in baseball. You have to learn from those one way or another. He’s a very mature person for his age and being up in the big leagues. I’m excited to see him play in the big leagues for a long time.”Cole (1-1) warmed up quickly and induced a double play groundout to end the second inning and hold the deficit at 3-0. He tossed 3⅓ scoreless innings of relief. Cam Bedrosian worked around a hit and a walk in a scoreless seventh inning. Hansel Robles pitched a scoreless ninth to record his 14th save.The only runs the Angels’ bullpen allowed came on home runs by Springer – one against Justin Anderson in the sixth inning and another against Ty Buttrey in the eighth.Related Articles Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Kevin Garnett: Blame ‘snake’ Glen Taylor for Timberwolves jersey not being retired

first_imgKevin Garnett wants nothing to do with Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor because, according to KG, Taylor failed to follow through on an “understanding” five years ago to move him into the team’s ownership group and/or front office.That means Garnett also wants nothing to do with any plans the franchise may have to retire his No. 21 jersey. Thibodeau was fired in January 2019 and replaced as coach by Saunders’ son Ryan.Garnett is embracing one other jersey ceremony — in Boston, where the Celtics will send his No. 5 to the TD Garden ceiling next season. His will be the 23rd retired number in Celtics history, or about 1 1/2 rosters worth. “Anybody who understands the Celtics culture, it’s a nurturing culture, it’s a real fraternity, and it supports each other. To be part of it is something special. I’m glad I’m part of it, and I’m glad I was able to experience the better way of the NBA and seeing how winning franchises really do things. That left a huge, huge impression on me that I’ll take to my grave,” Garnett told Charania. “I don’t do business with snake motherf—ers. I try not to do business with openly snakes or people who are snake-like,” Garnett said in a Q&A with The Athletic’s Shams Charania published Tuesday (subscription required).MORE: The time a young KG talked trash to Michael JordanA Garnett jersey in the Target Center rafters would be a slam dunk otherwise. Garnett was the expansion franchise’s first superstar and he was elected this month to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.KG said he loves Minnesota and the fans, but he “won’t forgive” Taylor for failing to honor an agreement he said the two had before former coach and team president Flip Saunders died in 2015. Taylor hired Tom Thibodeau in 2016 to succeed Saunders.”I thought (Taylor) was a straight up person, straight up business man, and when Flip died, everything went with him,” Garnett told Charania.last_img read more

Body found in Jupiter Farms near area of search for missing firefighter

first_imgThe Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office is reporting that a body has been found in Jupiter Farms near the area where rescuers were searching for a missing Broward County firefighter.The discovery was made Tuesday afternoon.James Von Minden was last seen Friday night after his truck hit a tree near the intersection of Randolph Siding Road and Alexander Run.Authorities had a running theory that the firefighter may have suffered a head injury in the accident and may have walked off disoriented or have been injured.While the body was found in the area of search for Minden, authorities have not identified the victim.last_img read more

Hubert Lawrence | Medal sweeps and wild cards

first_img As in London, the restriction will give a medal to a non-Chinese player. There is a solution that resonates far more with the spirit of fair competition. The suggestion is that each country be allowed three players in the Olympic singles competition once they meet the requirements of the International Table Tennis Federation. Moreover, it would preserve the right to sweep, which is permitted in other Olympic sports and to display the work, the infrastructure and national will that international dominance requires. The use of a wild card for either the reigning Olympic champion or World Champion would add excitement to table tennis. An Olympic wild card for the reigning World Champion would probably work well in that athletics, too. It would be a right only a winner could earn. • Hubert Lawrence has made notes at trackside since 1980. It isn’t fair when the rules of sport seem to smash one team or country in particular. It has happened in several sports and appears to have happened in table tennis, where China is the superpower. It simply doesn’t seem fair. China is the most successful nation in Olympic table tennis, winning 41 medals (20 gold, 13 silver, 8 bronze). In 2008, when China hosted the Games in Beijing, their players did the unprecedented. Led by Ma Lin and Zhang Yining, the Chinese delighted the lively home crowds by winning gold, silver and bronze in both the men’s and women singles. In a display of mastery, China won the men’s and women’s team events as well. Fast forward to the London Olympic Games of 2012. The rules changed. For the first time since table tennis became an official Olympic sport. In 1988, no country could enter more than two players in the individual events. Imagine that in Olympic track and field. The historic one-two-two finish by Jamaica in the 2008 100 metres would have been impossible. With Jamaica’s selection system, Sherone Simpson would have been barred from Beijing on account of her third place finish in the 100m at the 2008 Jamaican National Senior Championships. The same thing would have happened to Warren Weir who completed a Jamaican medal sweep at the London Games in the 200 metres. Like Sherone in 2008, he finished third at the Nationals. Untenable in other Olympic sports, the restriction has beaten world number two, Fan Zhendong, out the upcoming Games in Rio de Janeiro. He may become the king of table tennis later in his career, but this year his endeavour is for naught. In his place is reigning Olympic champion, Zhang Jike, the current world number four. This 28-year-old is wonderfully good in big tournaments. Before shoulder injuries slowed him, he had also won World Championships in singles when many doubted him in 2011 and 2013. Presumably, the Chinese table tennis authorities have taken that into account when they choose him over Fan and world number three Xu Xin. As we have seen in athletics, where the so-called wild card safeguards the qualification of immediate past winners to its latest World Championships, the presence of the defending champion adds something to the competition. Upsets make even bigger headlines when it is the champion who has fallen. Conversely, repeat wins make champions into legends. Zhang’s presence in Rio is therefore welcome, but because Fan can only watch, it comes at great expense. Restrictionslast_img read more